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That picture reminds me of my working life,climbing all those steps to access storage bins, repairing conveyor belts,changing head/tail drum bearings, all out in the open  in all weathers, winters not particularly good when the hand rails were covered in ice,steps covered in snow,then in summer there was not shelter from the hot sunshine but you still had to wear all PPE,overalls,boots,gloves,glasses,hard hat,ear protection and sometimes dust masks,not complaining,loved every minute, all quarries were and still are the same

 

Rog

 

Forgot to add,carrying all tools and equipment

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Saw this YT video today & enjoyed it. I know one or two on here like old wagons especially FLY 2 .    

Collars Ltd of Wembley owned AUU 602, a Commer two-ton chassis with an "art deco" streamlined van body by Holland Coachcraft of Govan in Glasgow. This van was displayed at the 1933 Commercial Vehicle

Yes I have swe, thanks. I hate the smell of the stuff, but madam found some in a cupboard somewhere the other night, and did my chest, back and feet. Now the feet bit I did hate, because I must be the

Really hard physical work but loved every minute and if I was to have my time again I would do the same,even in the managerial post I still enjoyed getting "out there" and doing what it took to get the plant running,real sense of achievement,certainly didn't get that same sense sitting behind a desk

 

Rog

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An old time wagon driver who taught me to rope & sheet used to work for Atlas Express driving a TK artic night trunker to Liverpool before he retired. Three hours there half hour to change trailers then three hours back to Nottm with a  five an half hour sleep  sleep in a layby on the way back. Twelve hours pay every night, cushty !

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One of the oldest established Nottingham  Showmen family, and still going strong. 

John Proctor still presents his 56 year old Jackson built Waltzer, in and around Nottingham/East Mids area.

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7 hours ago, IAN123. said:

Not many'd know how to rope and sheet today.

I don't think many new lorry drivers know how to tie there shoe laces never mind sheet and rope a load. My father in law, took pride in his skills of securing his load. He also taught three of his sons to do the same. But like has been said, curtain siders and the likes have taken over. Strange though, i see a lot more ratchet straps lying on the roads than I ever did with sheets and ropes, and curtain siders with loads bulging out of one side. Still i suppose that's progress for you!!

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6 hours ago, Waddo said:

Not many'd know how to rope and sheet today.

Even fewer know the proper use or have even heard of a fly sheet..

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20 hours ago, Waddo said:

I don't think many new lorry drivers know how to tie there shoe laces never mind sheet and rope a load. My father in law, took pride in his skills of securing his load. He also taught three of his sons to do the same. But like has been said, curtain siders and the likes have taken over. Strange though, i see a lot more ratchet straps lying on the roads than I ever did with sheets and ropes, and curtain siders with loads bulging out of one side. Still i suppose that's progress for you!!

 

Some of you will probably not be aware that roping and sheeting has effectively been outlawed by DVSA. The excuse being that ropes cannot be load tested and are therefore unsuitable as a method of restraint.

I agree about the roads being littered with ratchet straps; and as a motorcyclist I'm also seriously concerned about it.

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Sorry about the very poor quality of this picture,it was took on an old mobile phone. my eldest lad driving the wrecker, can't remember who he was working for then

 

Eddie.100904.jpg

 

Rog

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Only allowed to wear wellies (steel toe capped) for "wet working" now otherwise it's laced up ankle boots with steel toe caps, no rigger boots or velcro fastening footwear,trouble is if you ever got some hot stuff down your boot from gas cutting or welding you just had to let it burn through your foot until you undone your boot and took it off, where as with rigger boots or wellies you could just kick them off and maybe just scorch your socks thereby saving your foot, still them thats never done the job know best eh?

 

Rog

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