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My mother worked at Taylor's on King Edward St. first as a machinist, then a supervisor and eventually as an under-manager The "big-wig" there was named Hinkcliff (sp) and the general manager was named Cook. My cousin, John Griffin (mentioned elsewhere in these pages) was the head designer there until he set up his own business.

The Jaeger connection was initially that Jaeger contracted their manufacturing to Taylor's, then they became exclusive Jaeger suppliers and eventually they were bought out.

Gustav Jaeger (the founder of the company) was, by all accounts, something of a weirdo. There is something of his history on Wiki https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jaeger_(clothing)

 

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Have been reading this topic and wondered if it is still possible to buy Hucknell Shawls, have looked online but nothing pops up. Have found some pictures they look as fine as gossamer, i realise original companies will be long gone but there maybe local outlets who sell similar. Gem

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Very popular at weddings Meg..whether Hucknall ones are on sale..maybe not..unless a cottage industry type set-up is occuring..have a look online.

Does jonab recall the Williams Family?

Maybe i dropped a clanger yesterday..the three Williams Brothers made military uniforms throughout WW2...then again...as of late i could be wrong!

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I did know some Williams but not any of note in connection with this thread.

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7 hours ago, Geoffrey Dennis said:

During our mid teens, friends and I used to camp on the land around Black Rocks.

Two man ITISA tents with a sewn in ground sheet and separate fly sheet, sleeping bags. Primus stove, pots and pans and supplies of tinned stewing steak, Surprise peas and Deb instant mashed potato. The occasional Vesta curry was a luxury. The local pubs provided all our liquid needs. I still have one of those camping knives, fork and spoon sets that clip together. The big challenge was climbing Railway Slab in hiking boots not our Cletts Master? climbing shoes. I wouldn't have wanted to stagger home from the Miners to Black Rocks on a dark night after a few too many.

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I lived in one of the Broomhill Cottages on Nottingham Road, Hucknall from 1937 to 1970 and a few doors away was the framesmiths - a workshop where the shawl knitting frames were manufactured and repaired. The last remaining  framesmith I met  was Sylvester Smith who was very old (this was around the 1940's) and had a big white beard, looking like George Bernard Shaw!

The workshop became Tom Bailey's motor repair garage in the 50's and I helped to clear out all the knitting frame components and tools when he moved in, these items would be priceless for the frame restoration people today but they were just scrapped. The knitting frame needles were encased in a lead/tin holder and I melted down  some of these and cast them in a piece of tongued wood to make sticks of solder, some of which I've still got in my garage.

I can remember the noise of the machines that came from the  Bamkin's  Shetland Shawl factory on Portland Road, nearly opposite "Bottom Pit" - both long gone sadly.

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2 hours ago, Jeffery said:

I lived in one of the Broomhill Cottages on Nottingham Road, Hucknall from 1937 to 1970 and a few doors away was the framesmiths -

 

I don't know the area but I think this photo shows the place in question before modern housing took over.

Z31efVQ.jpg

The arrow on the right is Victoria Cottage (big house); the centre arrow is Victoria Cottages; and the arrow on the left is Broomhill Cottages (at right-angles to the road) - which seem to have survived. Presumably the framesmiths is one of the buildings further to the left.

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Just to clarify:  The framesmith is directly opposite Victoria Cottage  (the big one) and Broomhill Cottages are on the same side as the framesmith between the two big tree areas, opposite the cottages at right angles to the road. I can't remember if they had a name. 

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On 1/24/2018 at 4:18 PM, woody said:

The grey matter has stirred again and I remember another shawl factory that was Buck's. This could have been the one on Derbyshire Lane, I will try to clarify details of shawl manufacturers next time I see my cousin and relay the reply.

John Buck was my great, great grandfather - his daughter Eliza Buck was my great grandmother..........

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I used to walk along Nottingham Road when I was young, past all those buildings, on my way to and from the old Butlers Hill Schools. I remember seeing some of the buildings being knocked down when they widened the road.

 

I remember a big man with thick rimmed glasses often standing outside the house next to what is now Bestwood Road. He always seemed to have a flat cap and a thick overcoat on, whatever the weather. He always said hello, with a broad smile on his face when we passed by.

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I can remember the noise of the machines that came from the  Bamkin's  Shetland Shawl factory on Portland Road, nearly opposite "Bottom Pit" - both long gone sadly.

This took my interest as Neville Bamkin was my father-in-law, and I visited the factory on Portland Road several times. My better half is certain they never made shawls, but it was socks, socks and more socks.

 Here two works outing photos , probably from the 40s

Hucknall ... staff at F.J. Bamkin (hosiers) on an outing - 1930s? Hucknall ... F.J. Bamkin works outing sometime in the 1940s?

 

My album of Hucknall images, I flatter myself you might be interested, here

 

Hucknall

 

Regards, B.

 

 
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Your link brought many memories, Baz. Thanks for posting

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