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My Childhood Memories collection

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5 hours ago, catfan said:

A childhood memory I always remember was that of a neighbour who tried to gas herself putting her head in the oven one afternoon.

 

I have a similar childhood memory Catfan, our next door neighbour did the same and achieved what she set out to do, poor woman.  I remember my Mum saying that the woman had opened a bedroom window so the gas wouldn’t seep under the floorboards into my bedroom.  Whether that would be fact I have no idea.   Only days before she had been into our house for a Christmas drink and I remember while she was with us  I was lying on the floor reading my new Rupert Annual !!   

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The flip side to this was even better

Double A-sides are a thing of the past.

Radio Nottingham would have played this..reminds me of rushed homework to watch David Nixon Magic Show or Police 5.

Great writer ..Waterford man..Gilbert.

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Dad made me a little wooden battle ship about 1948-9, which we took to Newstead Abbey on Sunday afternoon to sail on the lake. I was really chuffed with it, but a big dog grabbed it, but I managed to hold on to the boat until the dog let go, then it bit one of my fingers down to the bone.

Dad did eventually manage to wrench the boat from the dogs teeth, but it had its teeth marks on the deck for evermore.

Again on a Sunday with the aforementioned boat at Colwick, where there was a little area of the Trent fenced off for kids to paddle in. 

The boat drifted through the fencing, and dad had to wade into the river to retrieve it. 

Again at the same area on another occasion, I was paddling and a massive dragonfly landed on a wall right near my face. I'd never seen one before, and was petrified of the thing. Good old dad to the rescue yet again !

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I couldn't hit like for that.  You had a couple of hard times there.

 

My late wife used to tell me of living on Linden Grove as a three or four year old and a big dog came and took her Teddy away.  I know I laughed when she told me but it was a traumatic experience for a kid.

 

I wandered into a neighbors yard when I was about three and got bitten by an Alsation.  Right on my lip.  I've still got a scar there.  It's amazing I like dogs as much as I do.  It never turned me off 'em.

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This was a radio memory..dash back home from me paperound..tea/ Flewitts toast and Junior Choice.

Between Paddy McGintys Goat and Ronnie Hilton and Bernard Cribbins..a few would slip through the net...Barry McGuire's Eve of Destruction and this by Manfred Mann.

Now i think it sounds like the Kinks and never knew Jack Bruce played bass on this.

No telly then..Ed Stewpot was the place...later Tiswas.

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1 hour ago, IAN123. said:

Now i think it sounds like the Kinks

I think it is the jangly intro that makes it sound a bit like the Kinks.

There used to be a great pub on Oak Tree Lane in Mansfield called the Flamingo it was a Holes, Newark brewery, pub and had a waterfall in the lounge area.

Photo:The Flamingo, Oak Tree Lane, December 2010

My favourite Manfred Mann song is of course Mighty Quinn with Mike D'Abo doing vocals as sung at the City Ground after the signing of "The Mighty Jim"

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Pretty Flamingo... Jack Bruce not only played bass, but his deep baritone (?) is audible in the backing vocals.  An unmistakable voice.

 

Memories.  1962.  I was desperate for a 'proper' record player. I had an old portable 78 player.. but nothing that would play 45's/LP's

 

We went with Mum down to a record store and 'hi fi' dealers in Nottingham.. though I can't recall which.

 

We ( Mum) settled on a Dansette Major player, which was a pretty decent take on the old Dansettes. ( TWO elliptical speakers, Bass and Treble controls, plus the option to plug in an extra speaker and 'go stereo'..   It never happened..)  I recall carrying it back to Trinity square and the 28 bus and doing my best to be 'a man' at 13.. but struggling a bit..

 

Mum bought this record too..

 

 

Shortly after, I bought my first single...

 

 

 

 

Dig!!

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I was like you, Col.  I wanted a record player desperately.  Cheapest was about 12 pounds in 1960.  My parents didn't have much money and I certainly didn't.  My dad finally picked up a cheap turntable that would plug into the radio,  Better than nowt he said and I was in no position to argue.  Couldn't afford much in the way of records though.  Well you know how it goes.  It eventually blossomed into the Hi-Fi bug, and as you know that is a lifetime disease.  Fun days.

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I'd never picked up on the 'Bruce' thing until I bought a vinyl Manfred's greatest hits.  It was in the sleeve notes.. but once listened for, it is unmistakeable.

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THIS REMINDS ME OF MY DAD,HE HAD A LOAD OF 78 RECORDS IN THE SHED AND AN OLD RECORD PLAYER,MAM WOULDNT  HAVE THE RECORDS IN THE HOUSE ,SHE DIDNT LIKE MUSIC,BUT ME AND DAD LOVED IT

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IAN 123

 

   My dad had hundreds of records in his shed ,in piles ,not stored properly ...if one got dropped they smashed into loads of bits,some were very old recordings which he had been given by his grandparents(who brought him up) i can remember one saying it had been recorded at drury lane,it was showboat...it sounded as if you were really there.....also some records smaller than normal 78s,it said on them something about being the first elecrtrical recorded records.

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The worst scaffolding I ever worked off was called 'monkey scaffolding' I think.

 

You may have come across it Ian, you first had to clear a vertical joint in the brick work and insert a large flat hook point upward 'very important, hook down and it fell off the wall'. On the outer part of the hook was a large slot into this went a triangular frame so that the long side was hanging down vertically against the wall and the battens went on the horizontal side. I can remember using it on Kettles vets on Gregory Blvd to get to some awkward cast iron gutter.

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2 hours ago, IAN123. said:

I remember this lot falling on the street about 1970..Albany Hotel area.Never trusted quickstage..tubes, clips, sprigets , swivels and me podger!63862.1.640.640.FFFFFF.jpg

67 ish Ian.

A schoolmate of min joined the fire service as a trainee & was his first job he was sent on 

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On 6/10/2018 at 12:03 AM, IAN123. said:

This was a radio memory..dash back home from me paperound..tea/ Flewitts toast and Junior Choice.

Between Paddy McGintys Goat and Ronnie Hilton and Bernard Cribbins..a few would slip through the net...Barry McGuire's Eve of Destruction and this by Manfred Mann.

Now i think it sounds like the Kinks and never knew Jack Bruce played bass on this.

No telly then..Ed Stewpot was the place...later Tiswas.

 

The reason the intros to Manfred Mann's Pretty Flamingo and The Kinks Lola sound similar is because both are played on a resonator guitar

https://www.dawsons.co.uk/blog/what-is-a-resonator-guitar

 

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On 6/19/2018 at 1:07 PM, crankypig said:

IAN 123

 

   My dad had hundreds of records in his shed ,in piles ,not stored properly ...if one got dropped they smashed into loads of bits,some were very old recordings which he had been given by his grandparents(who brought him up) i can remember one saying it had been recorded at drury lane,it was showboat...it sounded as if you were really there.....also some records smaller than normal 78s,it said on them something about being the first elecrtrical recorded records.

 

Ooohh Cranky. Wish you still had that lot!

 

Standard 78 records were 10".. with some being 12" ( like a precursor to the 12" vinyl LP)  The 12" 78s were mostly sold in sets, or 'albums', to give a complete classical symphony or somesuch.  The 10" 78s were essentially the same duration as the vinyl  '45.'  Way back in the 1960s , I had a few 'oddities'.  Some 78 rpm records seem to have been produced in an 8" format.  Others.. given away as free promotional items, were as little as 5" diameter.. or about the same as a 'modern' CD.  I had a couple of those.  I recall one on which a very 'clipped' and very 'British' voice extolled the virtues of the 'Crystalate Recording Company' and their latest singing sensation.., who was so memorable I can't recall his name.

 

'Electric Recording'   First done commercially in 1926 I think.  Before 'Electric Recording', the artists had to bellow into a large horn. which wasn't great for their performance.  'Electric' recording, allowed them to sing  or play into microphones etc., allowing them to perform more naturally, rather than going just for volume.

 

Col

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On ‎7‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 9:13 AM, IAN123. said:

But this- make me feel entirely English.

Eric Coates, A Hucknall lad and a prolific composer of many tunes that you will instantly recognise if you hear them, also famous for the main theme, The Dam Busters March, The Knightsbridge March and the theme from Music While You Work. He was probably less well known for the opening and closing themes from The Forsyte Saga

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, IAN123. said:

My dear old Mum loved

 

Old Deano,the absolute best,,singer even cowboy,, 

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To me there is nothing more British than this. Coming home after a long afternoon shift.

I think I might like to make my final exit to this.

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Sad Oz,,but nice,,me too,,

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Amazing for me to hear this after so long.  It may be more of a trial for others  ;)

 

http://website.lineone.net/~milbourn/HP_SONG.mp3?showpage=true

 

http://website.lineone.net/~milbourn/index.html?showpage=true

 

The old High Pavement School Song... Carmen Paviorum. I think this is the old 78 recording they played to us to teach us the melody in first year.  While I was there they had a rather nice electronic organ, which I thought worked better with the 'hymn /anthem' style of the song, than a plonky old piano.

 

Col

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