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Byron Cinema first opened it's foyer doors in 1936...showing a Shirley Temple film.

3 varying images of this art deco cinema.Art_Deco_Byron_Aeriel_fragment.jpgArt_Deco_HD_ad.jpg

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Jonab might well recall this view?

Main St.Hucknall seen through the parish church gates.d51c09161935664789d2e56b407f62fb--specia

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The library is on the right. I never got to know what was upstairs.

I thought there were more steps leading up to the door arch.

Always a very odd smell in there - Mansion polish, fags, Old Holborn, newspapers and some not too clean customers/patrons.

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Was this Trinity..or a Methodist Hall.Jonab might help...i attended jumble sales in the mid 70's.trinity.jpg

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^^^^ Both, I think.

I remember it as Trinity Church but I now see that it is called Central Methodist Church. The picture on GSV shows a somewhat different frontage to what is in the pictures here and from what I remember. On the left was a twitchell leading to a hall where they held things like jumble sales (as you recall, Ian), exhibitions and club meetings. One of the exhibitions was the Hucknall Cage Bird Society annual show where my dad showed and won a special prize for an albino sparrow. This bird was caught from the wild having been seen at the bottom of the garden. Dad spent weeks trying to catch it and, eventually, he did. It was kept in a cage for a couple of weeks until the bird show, entered into the show and it died a few days afterwards.

To the left of the twitchell was a stream which was teeming with fish - it wasn't really, I only ever saw two fish in there but it was more fish than I'd seen elsewhere (apart from Hedley Wrights slab on Watnall Road). To the left, even more, was a sort of prefab Co-op supermarket which replaced the (I think) the Little Red Library.

 

On the right of Trinity church was Taylders gents outfitters. This was one of those shops that never seemed to have any customers. All the clothes in there looked old-fashioned, even then. That space is just boarded up now according to GSV.

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Taylders was a superb shop where old fashioned service never ceased. On entering you would be approached by someone with a tape measure hanging around his neck and the question " Can I be of assistance Sir"?" . I visited several times and was extremely satisfied with quality, service and price. It was Hucknall's loss when the shop closed.

.

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Well said Woody..it was a shop i brought my Mum in with me..she appreciated the 'Mr.Grainger' approach..thus the purse was opened a little further.

Also a tailoring service was arranged..but the name escapes me.

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As I said old fashioned - more than fifty years ago. I don't like obsequiousness, never have.

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"Mr Grainger approach" defines what I mean.

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I know what you mean jonab...D&P on Friar Lane were like that too.

Remember all those pine trays with cap and blazer badges..

"Thomas A Becket-certainly Madam....blazer ,pants, shirts x2 jumper and cap...is master wearing the rugger shirt?"

 

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There was nothing obsequious about Taylders. It was politeness and attention to the customers choice. It was far better than the give us your money, goodbye attitude in a lot of places these days. 

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1 hour ago, woody said:

There was nothing obsequious about Taylders. It was politeness and attention to the customers choice. It was far better than the give us your money, goodbye attitude in a lot of places these days. 

Different area but the shop reminded me of two shops one in Newcastle other in Gateshead. Doggarts in Gateshead was considered very "posh" lady assistants with refined accents and the most beautiful staicase on entry, the other was Issac Walton in Newcastle very Grace Brothers in the mens department these days you are lucky to find an assistant.

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On the market place was a hairdresser's which has been there years can't recall the name, also Barry Austin's. Classic ladies/men's shop.

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I recall the hairdresser's further along, nearer the High St. but Barry Austin's doesn't come to mind at all.

 

Now the "Are You Being Served?" analogy has been raised, remember Cecil Bowd on the High Street near the old Post Office/Nellie Ricks/Bailey's pot shop? Mr Humphries to a T.

 

Bowd ran a "gents outfitters" and had the contract to supply uniforms for all the local schools. He suddenly lost that contract and he was ostracised by many Hucknallites. I was never told why. Mrs Slocombe worked in Nellie Ricks (haberdashers) and several Miss Brahms look-alikes worked both there and at Ford's, across the road.

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That may have been my uncle Jack.

I don't know what his job was in his younger days but, as he got older, he worked as a caretaker at Beardall St. School in the metalwork/woodwork/domestic science part (across the road from the main school) and, part-time, he helped clean the Byron after closing. What he actually wanted there was to collect all the dog-ends from the ashtrays to make roll-ups as his wife (aunt Doris) banned him from buying fags.

 

The school work got too much for him so he left there and spent more time at the Byron, eventually as commissionaire.

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Barry Austin's was originally Stallards shoe shop, again a popular shop with a lot of Hucknallites.

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I remember Stallard's very well. It must have become Barry Austin after I left the area completely (1978).

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Don't recall going in Stallards..up until 1983 used Hucknall and Bulwell..Wakefields in Hucknall was an Aladdins cave of ex forces gear .

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9 hours ago, IAN123. said:

Wakefields

I can remember starting work back in the sixties with a canvas gas mask holder haversack as a bag to take my snap to work. It was just right for a Tupperware sandwich box and a Thermos flask. Purchased of course from Wakefield's Army Stores in Mansfield. There was also a store called Yeoman's that sold similar stuff.

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