IAN123.

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1 hour ago, radfordred said:

 

Wonder when the term 'real ale' started being used ,when I drank Shippo's, Home Ales, Kimberly, & Mansfield in my youth it was never marketed as 'Real Ale'.

I think when CAMRA started out in 1971

 

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Totes RR..same in The Moulders..all the locals drank mild..so i followed suit. I used to meet a' more mature' lady in the Dover..she drank Mild from a ladies glass. A classic mil...

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A friend of mine owns a brewery (better not say which!) and he’s won prizes for his ‘real ale’. His brewery is basically a chemical factory where the product is made in stainless steel vessels from  water straight from the tap, not a spring and it’s not even ’Burtonised’ as some brewers do. His brewery is a shed on an industrial estate. I don’t drink beer these days but I have been round Shipstones and Home Brewery back in the sixties and more recently Bateman’s in Wainfleet and these were what I would call ‘traditional’ with wooden vessels and men in boots and leather aprons! I’m not denigrating his beer but it just seems a bit ‘factory’ rather than ‘brewery’ if you understand what I mean. ;)

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2 minutes ago, Bubblewrap said:

A "ladies glass" you mean a half pint tumbler?

 

A local ‘feminist’ went mad in my local when she was asked if she wanted her drink in a ‘ladies glass’

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I do chuckle to myself when i see the size of these galvanised barrels that pubs now use 9s 10s & 11 gallon, my old fellows weekly order would have been minimum 18 x 33 gallon barrels that would be just bitter, 7 or 8  x 33s of mild.

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When the Chitty Chitty Bang Bang built this, we thought it was great.pc00128-1-650x1024.jpgAnd a real up to date Youth Shop..Orange Hand..first pair of Monkey Boots from Viccy Centre.

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Another missing person ........The Engineer, a very clever man who helped to restore the Emett Clock.  I really enjoyed reading his posts when he was working on the clock.  Enigma may be able to persuade him and Littlebro to come back.  

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3 hours ago, Bubblewrap said:

I think when CAMRA started out in 1971

 

I attended what must have been one of the first CAMRA get-togethers in '71/72. It was at the Victoria Leisure Centre. Can't recall much about it, perhaps partook too much of the new fangled 'real ale'. 

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I think Beer Bores spoilt it all with those bullcrap phrases on the blackboard...essence of chocolate and heather etc... Frodos/ Warros scrumpy with bits floating in it...that was real..eating & drinking in the same glass.

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Yes Lizzie the missing are mounting day by day. Something must be wrong with the site. I think it needs a shot in the arm of something strong.

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If the ale I drank in my youth wasn't real I want to know what the bleddy 'ell it was that gave me all them 'eadaches 'cos they sure weren't imaginary!

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18 minutes ago, TBI said:

I attended what must have been one of the first CAMRA get-togethers in '71/72. It was at the Victoria Leisure Centre. Can't recall much about it, perhaps partook too much of the new fangled 'real ale'. 

Spyke Golding .......  a leading light where Nottingham Real Ale was concerned.  I knew Peter (Spyke)  Golding at school, he was given the nickname Spyke as he had a wicked sense of humour just like Spike Milligan.  We were in touch during the days of Friends Reunited.  He was a very bright lad who studied Chemistry at University and then worked at Boots and eventually  becoming a Science teacher, a very good one I imagine.  He never married and didn’t drive, preferring to travel widely around UK and Europe by train.  I believe he was Chairman of the local CAMRA group and was editor of The Nottingham Drinker which won several national awards under his leadership.  Sadly Spyke passed away in 2010 at the very young age of 61. He was diagnosed with cancer and it was too late to save him, he passed away within 3 months.   I believe the many local micro breweries are Spyke’s legacy.  

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My mother had no head for alcohol but liked the occasional sherry. She was also partial to Gold Label Barley wine but only ever had one.

 

My parents were keen dancers and, when I was a child, would sometimes go to Coleman's in Nottingham on a Saturday evening, leaving my sister and I in the care of a trusted babysitter.  I recall one evening they returned after I was in bed and there was a great deal of giggling coming from mum in the next bedroom, followed by a loud thump.

 

Turned out, mum had TWO barley wines that night and was so squiffy, she tried to get in the wrong end of the bed before falling on the floor!

 

We teased her about it for years!

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25 June 1974 was my parents' silver wedding anniversary and we had a 'do' at home for friends and relations.

 

I remember getting dolled up in one of my older sister's dresses...I was 16 at the time and still at school... and taking charge of the 'bar' even though I wasn't legally old enough to drink.

 

By 9pm, I was, apparently, paralytic...I blame the Babycham...and had to be carried up to bed. As people were going home, I apparently reappeared for long enough to push my father out of the front door, tell him it had been wonderful to see him and ask him to come and see us again soon.

 

I don't remember anything else until I woke up the next morning, still wearing my sister's dress and with the most awful hangover. The hangover was nothing compared to the rocket I got from mum!

 

 

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2 hours ago, IAN123. said:

That Gold Label Barley Wine was knockout fuel.

On a night out not long after moving to Nottingham we went into town, we were told we must try the barley wine.  A few of us had never tasted it before, it turned out to be a very short night one minute we were ok the next on our way home rather the worse for wear. I can honestly say it was my first and last night out on barley wine, it turned out i had 4 bottles (and i remember they were small bottles) so i was either a lightweight in the drinking scales or it was rocket fuel.

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There's a coincidence..my Mum drank it only once!!.. at Bob and Marys Parrys house on Matlock St. A Newcastle couple.

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Barley Wine was a quick and relatively cheap way to get drunk but it was lethal.  I drank it occasionally, in moderation, but once when I was at The White Eagle Polish Club on Sherwood Rise I had more than a couple, caught the bus back home to Arnold and as the bus turned a corner by Arnold Library (where it was in the good old days) I thought the bus was tipping over.  I managed to get off at the right stop and walk home but that memory is still so clear to me and I’ve never touched Barley Wine again.  Tasted horrible in any case. 

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Does anyone remember the horizontal glass cylinder beer pumps that contained half a pint. When the handle was pulled the cylinder moved inside the glass tube and delivered half a pint, twice for a pint. I seem to remember that many Mansfield pubs had them.

Also why is a beer pump sometimes called a "beer engine"?

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8 hours ago, LizzieM said:

Spyke Golding .......  a leading light where Nottingham Real Ale was concerned.  I knew Peter (Spyke)  Golding at school, he was given the nickname Spyke as he had a wicked sense of humour just like Spike Milligan.  We were in touch during the days of Friends Reunited.  He was a very bright lad who studied Chemistry at University and then worked at Boots and eventually  becoming a Science teacher, a very good one I imagine.  He never married and didn’t drive, preferring to travel widely around UK and Europe by train.  I believe he was Chairman of the local CAMRA group and was editor of The Nottingham Drinker which won several national awards under his leadership.  Sadly Spyke passed away in 2010 at the very young age of 61. He was diagnosed with cancer and it was too late to save him, he passed away within 3 months.   I believe the many local micro breweries are Spyke’s legacy.  

I did my HNC Chemistry with Pete aka Spyke Golding. It was a two year day release course at Trent Polytechnic (now university) in 1969-71. Spyke was working in Boots R&D Pennyfoot St and I was in in the Besston D10 Quality Labs.

He was a larger than life character even back then and regularly had the class in fits of laughter with his exploits. He was a massive Forest fan I recall and occasionally when Forest had a midweek night match that clashed with lectures the football always won out.

We had a Physical Chemistry lecturer named Mr Rowan who had no sense of humour whatsoever and Spyke would frequently have a run in with him. Physical Chemistry is bleddy hard work and thermodynamics is mind numbingly complicated.  Fifty years later I still have nightmares about Entropy, Enthalpy and adiabatic processes (don't ask), but back to Spyke and Mr Rowan. In one lecture early into a new term Spyke was on top form and Mr Rowan was trying hard not to lose it with him. The exchange went as follows:

Mr Rowan, “I see you're still playing the buffoon Golding”

Spyke, “no sir, I've taken up the violin”

The lecture theatre erupted and Mr Rowan quivering with anger and unable to speak tried to continue chalking the gobbledygook that is the first law of Thermodynamics on the blackboard but eventually gives up and sits down with his head in his hands. Class dismissed, lecture over.

A great example of Spyke's wit that was always in evidence during Physical Chemistry lectures.

I was so pleased to hear he became a science teacher. I'm sure his lessons were so much more entertaining than Mr Rowan's who I think eventually recovered but maybe retired early and took up basket weaving.

BTW before the start of evening lectures at Trent we would always manage a pint or two in either The Peach Tree (later Lillie Langtry's) where the toasties were always in demand or The Spread Eagle where the cheese and onion cobs and Bass we’re a splendid pairing.

Happy days. RIP Spyke.

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Those cylindrical beer pumps were in the front bar of the Grosvenor for a time. They replaced another type which comprised a clear plastic cube hollowed out with a sphere and a flexible rubber/plastic diaphragm separating the two halves. On operating the device, the diaphragm would move from one half of the sphere to the other thus dispensing a half pint. There were loads of complaints about these pumps, not least about the resemblance of the diaphragm to a contraceptive device and the disconcerting 'flapping' movement during operation.

 

Regarding the term beer engine, I think this is an association of the mechanism of most beer delivery devices - which is based on a piston - with the fundamental movement system of the steam engine.

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