IAN123.

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Rug making seems to have been quite a popular pastime years ago. My maternal grandmother made rugs, both of the rag rug type, using old, worn out clothes and of the type in the advert. Grandma tested new knitting patterns for Bairns Wear in Basford. The idea was that she created the garment from a draft pattern, using wool supplied, thereby identifying any errors in the instructions. She had to be able to knit to a required tension and the finished article was returned to Bairns Wear, pressed and wrapped in tissue paper. They were then put on display in the windows of Griffin and Spalding in Nottingham, along with published copies of the patterns for people to buy, and wool, to create their own. Some were baby clothes but others were jumpers, hats, gloves. Grandma could knit, crochet or sew anything...unlike me!

 

My mum remembered her mother keeping these garments in the making  -and the wool - in a pillow case to prevent any dirt being picked up and, as soon as mum bad gone to school in the morning, grandma got on with her knitting. It was a little extra money without needing to leave the house.

 

 

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2 hours ago, jonab said:

they replaced another type which comprised a clear plastic cube hollowed out with a sphere and a flexible rubber/plastic diaphragm separating the two halves.

Well done jonab! I'd forgotten about those.

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Those metered half pint pumps with the diaphragm had to be sealed & checked by weighs & measures department, the law was if the beer was not metered beer had to be sold in lined marked glasses. 

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RR I remember the rows about whether the head on some beers counted as part of the pint.

If you order a pint here in South Oz you get 425 ml (a schooner in other states)which is .75 of a  British pint if you want one of those you have to ask for an Imperial pint

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Once upon a time Glasshouse St.was a place to go to..as now, it acts as a road to go somewhere else. A great history before clap clinics and carparks.577eb15ec83bff48cbfe45fcb565cb0a.jpgUnion Square, off Glasshouse St.1919.

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Shame about the quality..but interesting...elephants departing Victoria Station..via the ramp..circa 1950's.826b4dbbc3d802c1ba2e48ea1f6952c7-notting

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The 44 at Swingers in Bulwell..not an adult themed pub or place...but the bus terminal..where the trolleybus contraptions swung at the tight turn.

nottingham-city-transport-office.jpgHe was a misery who ran the Garage..face like a week of wet washing!

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Spot The Difference..3 of Victoria Centre, Milton St.entrance.ed1584f9a26b230a2fcd11eb44d60997.jpgClock above the Super & Viva.a6d0958e8fe5eacecbeb8c8c3ac2c7e1-notting4062274-df664c44.jpgAn extra upper floor seems to have been added.

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( The Postcard Reads)A Drizzly Day On Wheeler Gate.nottingham-1935-leyland-435-bus-transporA 1935 Leyland on a 1945 wet Wheeler Gate..St.Peters Church somewhat obscured in the background.

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On ‎8‎/‎2‎/‎2018 at 12:50 AM, IAN123. said:

More connected to the Theatre Programme..i suspect earlier than 1912.

Photographer Frederick Karoly was quite well known..though he went bankrupt.english-couple_0001_1.jpgHis work.

Love  the leg of mutton sleeves on the blouse.

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Jill, you reminded me with the story of your grandma doing the knitting,  that I did knitting to order many moons ago. Lived down in Surrey by now, 3 kids, the youngest a baby, and saw an ad for hand knitters wanted. I have knitted since I was knee-high to a grasshopper. All my clothes then my kids clothes, so answered the ad, thinking I could make some pin money. The lady brought round the wool and pattern and said, I'll be back in 3 weeks to pick it up. Don't know if you are familiar with Aran sweaters, this was a man sized Aran. Crikey, me knitting needles were a blur, hands like bees wings, but I got it done inbetween everything else. After that I told her to give me children's patterns! 

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I know grandma did a lot of baby clothes ...after all it was Bairnswear...but I think they gave her patterns for adult garments too. She could knit anything, so it didn't matter. Crochet, knitting, sewing, she could do it all, unlike me who haven't inherited her talents!

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My father often told the story of how he, his older sister Mary and their parents Kate and Ted sat round the fire at Chapel Street in Beeston in the early 30s, making rag or peg rugs from old clothes.

 

One evening, running short of materials, Ted instructed my father to take himself round to Uncle Jack's, Kate's brother, and ask him whether he had any old clothes he didn't want.

 

Uncle Jack's response? "Tell your dad I've got plenty of old clothes I don't want. I'm wearing the b*ggers!"

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Before we were married, I started making a maroon Readicut  (sp) rug, but it took so long, I never finished it and my mum's neighbour offered to complete it.   Paul used to do a bit of it sometimes but we couldn't do it at the same time (i.e. One person each end) as the knots have to face in the same direction.  When the neighbour had finished it for us, I stuck the backing on, but by this time I'd gone off it, so it was never used.  I think my mum kept it...

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Those peg rugs used to give me the creeps. Just imagine all the bugs that used to live in their depths. I always thought they were grossly unhygienic!:(

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We never had any of those rugs and I do agree with Phil’s comments.  Can’t remember what we had on top of the tiled floor, all I remember is that when we moved into our new-built house in Arnold in 1958 we had Marley tiles throughout the ground floor which Mum was forever polishing.  We had fitted carpets when we’d been there for about 10 years, in late 60s. Remember Mum being so proud that we’d got ‘hotel quality’ stair carpet, bless her.  In fact it really was good carpet and was still down and showing no wear when we sold the house on Dad’s death 5 years ago.  

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Knitting for pin money Kath. I did that as I had a knitting machine. I knit all the jumpers and cardi's for both my children also a little pleated skirt for Deborah gloves and mittens with matching hats. I made quite a bit making for a small shop but then it became too demanding. My mum and dad both had machines and  knitted to sell. My brother was in the army and dad designed a chart with the emblem of his group. The first time he wore it he was called into the office by his superiors and he thought ohoh I'm in trouble for wearing my new sweater. He was interrogated as to how did he  get it and who made it etc. When he told them his dad had designed it and knitted it while his mum had sewn it together , his superior said " ok we want 22 of them making and they havent to be repeated to anyone else." Talk about busy bees there was navy blue wool everywhere. These were made for the "Blowpipe"  troup  and were a great success. It started a craze for having special designs made for kids and adults alike.

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13 hours ago, philmayfield said:

My father wouldn't allow the 'disgusting things' in the house!

My mother used to think the same about secondhand books. She imagined that they all came from houses and hospitals laced with infectious diseases and just opening one would release all sorts of 'germs'. A bookshop that particularly caught her notice was a small place near the top of Drury Hill, on the left going down - it was painted red and had books outside on small trestles. She would cross the road to avoid going near the place but, Drury Hill being so narrow, that wasn't very far.

 

She was an avid reader and user of Hucknall town library and the "Little Red Library" so, I did try to point out that library books had been in other people's houses but according to her, they were 'clean houses'.

 

I really don't know why I remember these snippets. It's odd what NS can do to one's memory.

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I have posted 32 ATO before..but this Training Bus image does differ8595755384-5efda911fb-b.jpgParked at Brooklyn Road, Bulwell.

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South Sherwood St. X267645-1-640-640-UNPAD.jpg1999, taken from The Royal Centre..showing construction of The Cornerhouse and a now vanished Trinity Square.e55d0795c5b386161308625a64b47d6d.jpgEarly 1980's, this time The Royal Centre during ongoing works...Thomas Formans is still there..where the Cornerhouse now stands.

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