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Brilliant stuff Beekay,  up there with you best ever postings. Some memories in the slide show too. Can you find any more?

I can only see one other track on YT it's a good 'un too.

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Moved into our new home today,,now sat quietly apart from a little jig when the music of Dr Hook gets too much to sit still, The site seems to have got back to its friendly ways,,so I'm back,,

I listen to "Always" and I'm thinking of fabulous Mrs WW, from happy courting days to the sweetest honeymoon, through all the years, all the sunsets, all the sunrises, all the hard times, near disaste

Ben, another group called The Spinners with some fantastic shots of the UK. The song was all about the "Right to Roam". Written by Ewan MacColl I've walked and climbed in most of the places in th

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I found 'Brassed off'' very moving........worked in Grimethorpe during ''Miners strike''.......had to change my accent..........

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For the benefit of  AG and Ozstallgian and all other exiles, this is dedicated to you all...

 

 

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Why thank you kind sir. It is just my feeble attempt to show that despite digs from certain quarters, I do still think about Nottingham. I know naff all about classic cars, so left that to you guys. :rolleyes:

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Enjoyed 'Black Lace'' they came 7th in Eurovision..........reckon they'd have won it with Gang Bang''.....from Rita.Bob and Sue...lol

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Excellent stuff BK.  Here's a  rather older view...  ;)

 

 

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Sorry Col, I'm afraid I couldn't understand a word of it. Like the melody though. Cheers.

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On 4/16/2021 at 5:51 PM, benjamin1945 said:

I found 'Brassed off'' very moving

A brilliant movie. I was born and brought up in a colliery village and played in a brass band for a while.

I could put a real persons names to every one in that film. 

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Most of my older relatives worked at various pits for a time...Calverton...Bestwood...Babbington and Gedling.......and the Bulwell area has an History of Pits.....a few of my old schoolmates also went down Pit...............My Daughter played in the Bestwood colliery (that was) band.........enjoyed following them for a while when we lived in Bestwood Village.........

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Very moving.......felt for the mining families when it all came to an end.........so sad.........not that i would ever have considered working down the Pit.........many of my old mates spent their working lives in the Mines...........I was asked on leaving school by the ''Jobs Officer'' which Pit was i going down...?...TOLD HIM....

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Weren't the Bestwood band known as the 'Black Diamonds'?

As an aside, I once went to Annesley to collect a cheque for Nottingham Spastics society. During the evening some kindly locals relieved me of my rear light clusters from my car !

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Glad you liked it Kath. Took many a bus round Minver crescent in me time.

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If 'Bestwood Coal and Iron' hadn't sunk Bestwood Colliery around 1870.. I quite literally would not be here.. So now you know who to blame....;)

 

My Great Great Grandfather moved his family from Crich, via Chesterfield, to the new colliery. Old Samuel has been in St Marks Churchyard in Bestwood since 1898. His son John lived in the village too..with his family. My middle name John.. is after him.  John's son Arthur lived in Bestwood village too. He was my Grandfather.  My brother's middle name is Arthur. after him. My Dad also worked in Bestwood Colliery, before Linby.

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An' I worked in Bestwood colliery, in the lower seam to my older brother, God rest him..

I remember on one afternoon shift, after coming out the baths, I saw a mate of my brother. He said, quite nonchalantly,  "Don't bother waiting for your youth ! He got buried down pit". He neglected to tell me that my brother had been brought out and taken to hospital.

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When my husband worked down the pit I once got a phone call to tell he he had been hurt and would be going to hospital. Luckily one of his mates arrived at the door a few minutes later to tell me he was okay. A newby had started one of the trains off whilst he was doing something on the track and although he got out of the way he was stuck between the side of the pit and the train. He ended up with some cuts and bruises. He had one that was just above his ear to right near the corner of his eye, lucky it ended where it did he could have lost his eye. He had the usual blue scar there.

About 15 minutes later an ambulance appeared and he got out. Came to drop off his bike before he went to hospital! Didn’t know whether to kiss him or hit him:ohmy:

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, nonnaB said:

That was a bit brutal BK . 

 

Nonna.. in earlier times, Beekay would have crossed the alley from the entrance to the pithead baths.. and into the Bestwood Hotel... otherwise known as the 'Clubbie'.  It was used as a morgue after pit accidents .  By the 1950s it was pretty much a normal pub, although it had non standard opening hours to suit the miner's shift patterns.. I believe.  My Grandparents.. Arthur and Doris ran it from sometime around the end of WW2, to the early 1960s.  It's still there.. converted into flats.

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Let it roll for more of Joan and Mimi.

Beautiful and talented sisters.  RIP Mimi.

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On my last visit to the UK I really struggled as many of the landmarks, the colliery headstocks, had gone and many new roads had been built. The landscapes that now look like rolling green hills used to be slag heaps and lakes that people now fish in used to be washery ponds. Sad about the jobs that have gone in the mines and allied industries but the environment is certainly better. Gone is the taste and smell of the coal smoke that hung over the villages. As they used to say on a clear day you could see the smog.

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