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I have a very nice copy of that on original Oriole 78. Nancy passed away in 2003, and of course, took her name from the folk song.. being by birth.. Anne Alexandra Young Wilson.  Here you go..

 

 

Me.. I'm 'digging on' the baseball boots and shoulder high waist bands...

 

Triple tongueing.. as Eric Morecambe would say.. 'They can't touch you for it..'

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Moved into our new home today,,now sat quietly apart from a little jig when the music of Dr Hook gets too much to sit still, The site seems to have got back to its friendly ways,,so I'm back,,

I listen to "Always" and I'm thinking of fabulous Mrs WW, from happy courting days to the sweetest honeymoon, through all the years, all the sunsets, all the sunrises, all the hard times, near disaste

Ben, another group called The Spinners with some fantastic shots of the UK. The song was all about the "Right to Roam". Written by Ewan MacColl I've walked and climbed in most of the places in th

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Been 'discussing' Donovan. in 'another place'.  There seem to be two camps.. those who think Donovan was just a lightweight 'folk' singer.. and those who see him as some sort of UK answer to Dylan. No way he was in the same league as Dylan.. but he had something.. This gets complicated because now.. Donovan seems to be promoting himself as the originator of Flower Power, a major influence on the Beatles.. etc.. That side of him I find rather sad..but he did write some beautiful songs.

 

 

Which was good enough for Joan Baez:

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Dylan v Donovan argument was quite intense at the time yet I never heard a definitive answer of why one was considered better than the other.

Dylan was more enigmatic in the choice of words, syntax, and his music quite raucous in his early days. Donovan somewhat  gentle, simplistic, more direct, and less ambiguous although nowhere near as prolific.

 

There was a short time when Barry McGuire and Eve of Destruction was hailed as a future protest singer in the same deep and meaningful mould. That also had people who praised and some who sneered.

By what criteria do we judge which league they are  in?

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It's interesting Jim.

The whole Donovan v Dylan thing though.. was a largely manufactured notion, with the UK industry/press, pushing the idea of Donovan as 'Britain's answer to Dylan' which of course he just wasn't, and probably didn't want to be. Echoes of the earlier 'Cliff or Elvis?' and even 'Beatles v Stones' and later 'Oasis v Blur.'

 

Dylan was of course heavily influenced by the original 'protest' singer Woody Guthrie..and he showed that in songs such as 'Masters of War', 'A Hard Rain's a Gonna Fall' and the very witty 'Talkin' World War Three Blues'.  Whereas Donovan , as you say, seemed to be more introspective and personal/romantic in his own songs.  His 'protest' songs were mostly covers, such as Universal Soldier (Buffy Saint Marie?) The War Drags On (C.J.Johnson), Do You Hear Me Now? (Bert Jansch)..though Donovan did a version of Woody's 'Car Car'.

 

Barry McGuire was interesting.  If I'm not mistaken he originally appeared as part of the New Christy Minstrels, along with several others who would go on to fame and fortune in their own right later.

 

Barry's 'Eve of Destruction', was actually written by the mysterious P.F Sloan, who had a couple of minor solo hits... ( 'Sins of the Fathers') but mostly just wrote stuff...including 'California Dreamin'..a huge hit for the Mamas and Papas. 

 

Sloan also provoked a song called 'PF.Sloan', written by Jimmy Webb and recorded by many, including Jennifer Warnes, Rumer and two versions which I have, by Cassell Webb, and this one..by Unicorn.

 

I hope you are keeping up..  I'll be asking questions..

 

And finally.... though a different group of musicians.. I always lump this in with that whole 'vibe'..

 

 

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I stopped posting in "What You Listening" as not to offend, well I'm music mad & play it 7/8 hours a day, so today I'm listening to the other Mr Williamson, made my day easier, me Dad always got a tune out of an harmonica.

 

 

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According to my reference books.. just the one hit here..and a follow up..'Tom Cat' in the US...though they had several albums.   They had disbanded by 1967.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rooftop_Singers

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I adored them!  Despite performing as a sort of comedy group....sending up the 1920s/early 30s UK jazz scene..they were all very good musicians.  The lead singer 'Whispering' Paul Mc Dowell..continued in acting and other artistic pursuits until he died in 2016.

I loved the way that McDowell would stand aside, often leaning casually on a jardiniere or somesuch and smoking a cigar..until it was his turn to sing.. then I'd be worried that he wouldn't get to the mic in time.. :biggrin:  He always did.

 

 

 

And of course there were 9 of them.

When interviewed as to why they were called "The Tempererance Seven" Captain Sephus Howard, or some other member, said" there are nine of us which means we are one over the eight". ..an expression meaning 'drunk'..hence the link to Temperance.

 

 

Member 'John R T Davies' was also a noted sound engineer and restorer of early recordings. 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_R._T._Davies

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Just discovered this, a recording from the 'National Jukebox' of the US Library of Congress:

 

https://www.loc.gov/item/playlist?tracks=jukebox-673171

 

It's from 1924, which pre-dates 'electrical' recording (i.e., using microphones), by about 2 years.  So this will have been recorded directly to a wax disc by the players' noise being funelled through horns to the cutting stylus.

 

I love this stuff.

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I thought I'd heard most things since buying music in the 60s but how have I missed this "belter" from 1969 ?

Heard a snippet from it on the Grand Tour when Clarkson and co were doing a road trip .

 Managed to track it down by googling some of the lyrics and it's by Bob Seger . Ramblin Gamblin Man.

 

 

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Love this song........and love brown eyed girls......

Do you remember when...we used to sing....

Sha La La La la La La La La dee dah......lying in the green grass on Vernon Park...........:rolleyes:

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Lovely song.........nice video......Happy people........

All in Tesco car park Bulwell..........

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Thought Freddie had a great voice......also so very funny.......not to everyone's taste....but certainly to mine....

Chap i went to school with was his personal driver for a time........said he was ''a complete arshole'' even that made me laugh.....the chap from school was a right misery anyway,,,,,

Poor old Freddie had a sad end to his life........RIP Freddie....

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It would've been interesting to see how Freddie Starr ended up if he'd stayed as a singer, without branching out into comedy etc.

 

I agree he had a really good voice....and I liked him as a comedian as well, notwithstanding the stories about him as a person.

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 I was pondering today on the accusation that Leonard Cohen's songs were 'music to slit your wrists by'.  Of course they weren't...and I'm one of those people who generally feels better after listening to a sad song.   That is what the blues are all about...

 

But anyway.. I was suddenly reminded of some very sad songs by the Ink Spots which I had on 78 way back..

 

 

 

 

No sell by date on great music.  :)

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To slit your wrists by is a bit harsh... now if you're contemplating jumping off a bridge...;)

Is it just me that thinks the words to Hallelujah are complete nonsense?

And how on earth does a sad song make you feel better?

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I think the meaning of the Hallelujah song is that even when we mess up (as we all do sometimes!) God can bring good out of it in some way and is able to set us back on the right path.  
Hallelujah means ‘Praise God’ so I think it means to praise God in all situations.

A bit of a simplification I know, when many in the world are suffering…. 

Sadly, I don’t have an answer for that except to say that human nature - which is naturally selfish - can sometimes be very cruel and unfeeling towards others 

 

 


 

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Big Big Tune Bap Bap Bad Ya Now Up!

 

 

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22 hours ago, Brew said:

And how on earth does a sad song make you feel better?

 

I'm not sure.. but Blues musicians recognise the effect..as did Neil Diamond in his 'Song Sung Blue'.

I suppose that 'getting all of your emotions out there.' has a cathartic effect of some sort.

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As for Helleluja.  I should first say that I find Cohen to be one of those artists, like Dylan, Van Morrison, Joni Michell and others.. (all to varying degrees) whose music often goes beyond mere 'storytelling', to invoke mental images and emotional mixes which defy rational explanation.  They are, if you like, surrealist.  If I don't 'get' the lyrics pretty quickly, I tend to just let them roll over me.

 

But.  Here's what I found for Halleluja.

 

https://auralcrave.com/en/2020/01/19/leonard-cohen-hallelujah-the-meaning-of-the-lyrics/

 

So basically.. many life situations and events can produce 'Halleluja'.

 

Here's possibly my favourite song by Emmylou Harris.. I 'get it', on one level.. but I'm sure I'm missing something else. 

Eitherway... I love the tune and the music.

 

Winter summer seasons is taken over it's quiet
Like new fallen snow
I told you summer stories
But outside is getting mighty cold

I told you everything I could about me
Told you everything I could
How would you feel if the world
Was falling apart around you

Pieces of the sky were falling
In your neighbors yard but not on you
Wouldn't you feel just a little bit funny
Think maybe there's something you ought to do

Solutions that never lay down before you
The answers are all around
Believing is all the friend you need to talk to
Believing in you

I told you everything I could about me
Told you everything I could

I told you everything I could about me
Told you everything I could

 

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What a wonderful morning best wake the neighbours up 

 

 

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JUST THOUGHT I'D WAKE YOU ALL UP......

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