Oztalgian

What are you listening to now ??

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When You Walk in the Room. Love the jangly 12 string intro. The Searchers version was good too, a year later than the original.

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Not my favourite version.. but good enough and easily accessible via Youtube whilst pratting about on here. I love the way that Clarinet can move from high to low so well.. and has such a clear tone. These tunes are just so timeless and affecting.  The peeps who write the sleeve notes get into all sorts of cobblers about things being 'spring like'.. 'evocative of home/youth/' etc.  I can't pin it down like that.  I just react to the tunes.   I love the classical stuff by Weber, Crusell and Mozart, as well as jazz stuff from Goodman and Shaw.. also Sidney Bechet.. (yes.. I know he actually played Soprano Sax.. but his style was similar)  Like all the best instruments it sort of mimics the human voice. I have this on vinyl somewhere by a player I prefer.  Might be Thea King... can't remember... Will have a rummage tomorrow.

Enjoying it though.

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Last one tonight. My early explorations of  music, but especially jazz, blues etc...  were sort of hi-jacked when I came across this on a Parlophone album called 'Humph at the Conway' . Humphrey Lytellton's band recorded live at the Conway Hall in 1954.. when I was 5.   I still have it.. without a cover and barely playable...

 

It's a very good album of the peculiarly British idea of 'Traditional Jazz.'... But the stand out tune for me is 'Wally Plays The Blues'.  This.. by Wally Fawkes who was not only a damned fine clarineterist.. but also in his day job was the famous cartoonist 'Trogg'.

 

This sort of hopeless...... endlessly 'reaching' blues.. was my refuge during adolescent crises..  But I still love the tune to this day.

Sublime stuff.. and I think the audience reaction says it all....

 

I was pleasantly surprised to find that if you let this video roll on, you are treated to some very nice stuff by the 'Avalon Jazz Band'.

 

 

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Oztalgian, you jogged my memory of this. (Song association thread).

 

Marmalade, Junior Campbell and Dean Ford writers, recorded this in 1966. Lead singer Dean Ford re recorded it in 2014 (??) with a new video, even more introspective. The poignancy here, to me, is an older and very much wiser man stocktaking his life rather than stockpiling his life. An even more bitter-sweet ambience these days.

Reflections of my life:-

 

 

 

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Top video that WW, really like the way they merged the original footage with the new.

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DJ360, I woke up about 3am and knew I wasn't going to sleep again so I logged on NS, as one does. All three of your posted videos were "unavailable". So, browsing YT for inspiration I found a couple of tracks from an old vinyl, a copy of which I had 40 yrs ago. They were 'Blues for Yolande' and 'You'd be so nice' by Colman Hawkins and Ben Webster. Maybe you'd give them a listen sometime, if you're not already familiar with them.

. Ww.

Edit, normal service resumed this morning. I do like Picardie. Dad had a popular version on 78 by Calvert in the 1950s which was played multiple times per evening on a wind up.

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WW, thanks for your kind comments.  I really would seek out 'Wally Plays the Blues'. If you can see it.  It makes British 'trad' almost respectable....

I will seek out the other tunes you suggest,  Coleman Hawkins could do no wrong for me. Webster I know less about.. but it's never to late to learn.

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WW.  Thanks for the Dean Ford Vid.  I've seen it before but worth repeating.  So too though are many originals.  I always loved Marmalade, especially Reflections.. and Rainbow.  They fitted into my life very well at the time.

Until a few years ago.. I didn't realise how big a hit 'Reflections' was in the US. but thinking about the whole Viet Nam thing. I can see why...

 

Check this out..  A stupid cruel and pointless war.. but all too real for the poor sods who had to choose between duty and morality.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JOtab0BKOGY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Got any vinyl on the Marmalade label DJ? 

Think it quite scarce, I only have one!

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Nope.  none

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Just googled..not as scarce as  I thought Auger, Blossom Toes, scarce to me in the early eighties!! Unless you pay silly money..at the time about £8.

The one I have is Sonny Boy.. Don't send me no flowers..great cover!

 

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Dave Greenfield keyboard extraordinaire Rest In Peace youth x

 

One for Mr Dawson 

 

 

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Awful video - outstanding music - peerless !!

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Millie Small died yesterday. from a stroke apparently.  She was 73.  I well remember this song.  I seem to remember her acting later in her career.  I thought she was a nice girl.

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dwrHCa9t0dM

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Millie Small had nothing to do with Bubblegum. 

 

Millie's big hit was rooted in Jamaican Ska.. known here and world wide at the time as Blue Beat.  The other significant mainstream 'Blue Beat' hit at the time , at least here, was Mockingbird Hill by the Migil Five.  Who were all white.

 

Wiki:

 

Quote
My Boy Lollipop
"My Boy Lollipop" is a song written in the mid-1950s by Robert Spencer of the doo-wop group The Cadillacs, and usually credited to Spencer, Morris Levy, and Johnny Roberts. It was first recorded in New York in 1956 by Barbie Gaye. A later version, recorded in 1964 by Jamaican teenager Millie Small, with very similar rhythm, became one of the top selling ska songs of all time.Wikipedia

 

Some argue that Bubblegum started  as early as the mid 50s and even attach the label to stuff by Holly, the Beatles etc., but Bubblegum wasn't really a defined genre here intil late 60s. and was characterised by 'artists' such as 1910 Fruitgum Co. , Kasenetz Katz, and, as you say..The Archies.

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Thanks for the heads up DJ360 but it still sounds like Bubble Gum  to me. 

To someone relatively uneducated in this music genre what is the difference between Reggae and Ska?

Can you name some Ska that I might have heard or been aware of.

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Hi Oz.

 

Thing about Bubble gum for me is that it is one of those terms which is applied to music 'after the fact'.  So, people can judge certain songs as 'belonging' to bubblegum as if it was actually a bona fide musical genre.  I don't believe it is and I don't believe that many of the songs now singled out for inclusion were intended to be bubblegum.  The first time I was really aware of the term was at the time when it was used widely in the late 60s to describe a spate of stuff which was pretty much self confessed bubblegum.

 

To be honest, I have a similar problem with 'Northern Soul'.  It has a function as a descriptor of the sort of music which somebody somewhere has decided deserves the appelation, but that's about the size of it. Next to nothing was deliberately written as 'Northern Soul'.  Much of what I played from around 1967 to 1971 was soul stuff which the 'Northern' crowd later adopted as their own.  Much wasn't.  It was mostly about the beat, so broadly speaking the slower, funkier stuff from the Altantic stable tended not to make the cut, whereas most Motown did.

 

As for Ska.  I'm no expert, but I heard the terms Blue Beat, Ska, Rock Steady and then Reggae, more or less in that order. Blue beat was bouncy, as in Millie's 'Lollipop'.  Ska was more punchy, you may have heard things like 'Al Capone', or 'One Step Beyond' by Prince Buster, or Guns of Navarone by the Skatalites, etc.

Ska sort of morphed into Rocksteady.. mostly about rhythm again.. and then Reggae. Of course there was a significant Carribean poplation in Nottm by the 1960s and the music was soon speading out into the wider R&B/Soul. community as well as the mods, skinheads etc. I don't know how long you've been in Oz, but I doubt there's a similar 'scene' there.

 

See https://www.liveabout.com/difference-between-ska-and-reggae-3552831

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Thanks for that DJ360.

I don't know and haven't heard of any of those songs or groups that you mentioned.

I read the link and listened to some of the examples and must admit some of the "differences" are a bit too subtle for me. The only real differences I perceived were the tempo and the predominance of bass.

It seems to me that some of these "genres" are just minor variations on the one before.

I shall continue in my blissful ignorance of genres and carry on with the maxim If I like it I listen to it and if I don't like it I don't listen. I find the same rule applies when it comes to drinking wine. 

We have been in OZ since 1975, and we have all the usual genres that are present everywhere else. The only two I am aware of that are peculiar to Australia are the music of Australian Aborigines led by such groups as Yothu Yindi and individuals such as Geoffrey Gurrumul Yunupingu which blends modern instruments with traditional instruments and voices to produce unique sounds, well worth a listen.

The other is Aussie Pub Rock, loud music based on electric guitars and drums. Called pub rock because of the venues that these bands played in. We have two venues in Adelaide that are synonymous with the genre The Largs Pier Hotel and The Governor Hindmarsh Hotel they spurned such bands as Hunters and Collectors and Cold Chisel. Other well known bands that had their origins in pub rock are  ACDC, INXS, Midnight Oil, etc

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Just heard that Phil May.. lead singer of the Pretty Things. has passed aged 75.  Although I only really bought into their two big early 60s hits. they continued performing and recording until very recently.

 

I you liked these two songs around 1964. you were pretty cool..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 5/9/2020 at 4:20 AM, Oztalgian said:

Thanks for that DJ360.

I don't know and haven't heard of any of those songs or groups that you mentioned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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And a couple of softer vocals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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