IAN123.

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Union of South Africa coming to the North York Moors railway this April, we'll be there !     Its' last showing before permanent retirement.

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On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 4:50 PM, mary1947 said:

Putting you head out of the window and getting the bit of soot  in your eye.

Siting in one of the first carriages after the tender and if the windows were open getting wet when they lowered the scoop into the trough to pick up water on the go. Or in one of the last carriages in winter where the steam heating was not that effective.

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7 hours ago, jonab said:

 

I've always classed "antique shops" the same thing as junk shops but having a hiked up price.

 

This British obsession with 'antiques' (promoted by low-budget, low-quality, big audience TV shows) has spawned loads of junk shops and flea markets opening up down here where the most unbelievable tat and rubbish are sold - mainly to the British.

 

Yes, the markets themselves are not new but the number of them and the dreck quality of items on sale has reached rock bottom. Only yesterday I saw several old wine cases, which were worm-eaten and literally falling apart, on sale at €20 each. These are things that were given away and which I used as kindling.

About 40 miles from home we've got Hemswell Antiques Centre who advertise themselves as the largest antique centre in Europe. See their website. In general they sell quality stuff but very few bargains are to be had these days as the dealers can check comparative items on the web and price accordingly. There are some places which tend to sell house clearance stuff. There's a couple in Horncastle. There you can find piles and piles of absolute tat. The centre in Heanor is not much better. They are very popular for an afternoon out though - very much like garden centres. One man's junk is another man's antique it would seem.

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6 hours ago, Stavertongirl said:

I must say I dont know anyone who is “obsessed” with these tv shows perhaps they are ex-pats trying to blend in? I do occasionally watch then if nothing else is on as I find some of the stuff people buy (and so called experts rave about) is hillarious. But still one mans junk is another mans treasure so who am to judge.

Perhaps not quite obsessed but, looking online at the UK TV schedules it appears that the number of 'antiques' programmes had burgeoned since the days of Antiques Road Show and Arthur Negus - there's an almost unending supply of them now in the morning with sections on that ghastly This Morning show, whole dedicated shows at lunchtime, mid-afternoon, late afternoon, evening and so on.

I'm sure it's these programmes that encourage 'the British' to seek out the tat-fests that are becoming more and more common here.

It's fine for the local tatmongers, I'm sure but it's not good for my firewood! (that last was supposed to be a joke - there are vast forests here to provide ample fuel).

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I well remember Scurrs. Piles of tat outside, I think it had aspirations to be a junk shop.

Dad once got a set of spanners from there, don't think they were antique though, not from Korea.

 

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Pretend vanadium TBI..glad i got a glimpse of the Star Of India. Mick2Me and Fog...mention it in past posts.

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Yes Ian, I reckon those 'vanadiums' were zamak. Got me thinking though, I wouldn't be surprised if mam's still got a few in her tool tin which she took charge of when he passed. Neither would chuck anything away.

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Chrome vanadium from other countries translates to case hardened cheese.

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I've also got some one legged spanners, that at the time were a bargain!!!

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Thanks for the photo of Bobs Spares Ian, on the corner of Alfred St Central and Northumberland St, about 100 yards from the Commo ancestral home!

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Waddo, afraid not, we lived in Comyn Street from 1947 until 1954 and didn't get to know many folk who lived in Alfred Street apart from the Blands who owned the chippy, Richard was a mate of mine, and the Pecks, Jenny went to Shelton St school with us, her Dad stood in local elections as the Communist candidate.

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Waddo..read your post to Commo..and the Larvin name is familiar..but with my Brothers who were born in the early and mid1950's.

John Larvin played snooker ..may have been in the Cadets?

The Lundy family from the Medders i also recall.

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Ian, it's probably the same family, there was a lot of them. My dad used to play snooker with one of them I'm sure, but only across the road from grans cafe, the Admiral Dundas. It was only Pat Larvin that I remember (somehow i always seem to remember the women) she used to work for my dad. The Lundys i don't recall, even though I went to school down the 'medders'.

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On 3 February 2019 at 5:30 PM, TBI said:

I well remember Scurrs. Piles of tat outside, I think it had aspirations to be a junk shop.

Dad once got a set of spanners from there, don't think they were antique though, not from Korea.

 

 

I knew Liz Scurr, her parents ran the shop and they lived in West Bridgford.

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Wally Engles on Mansfield Rd..brilliant shop..made Mr.Trebus look tidy.

Bits & Bobs Emporium on Greg Boul...

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Daft as it sounds, furse didn't do many smaller stacks in Nottingham. It was Stan Allan at basford that mainly had that luxury!. They also did the stack at 'Shippos'.

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Lillie Langtry's recently refurbished, I'll be in there later today, the hand pulls always good, Peter Hook & the Light @ Rock City. 

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Willow might be right..the photo description said"1930's"..which i pooh poohed..the Peach Tree stonework was'nt painted cream until 1960..good sleuthing!

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Taylors Foundry..it says..Little John is in E Flat and is the deepest toned non- swinging bell in England.

It weighed before tuning..25100lbs.

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Ya beat me to it Ian, but just to add a bit, the clock was built by 'Copes ', our very own word famous watch maker.

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Don't know about the maintenance contract, but if they did, it's up in 8 years time!!. To add further, apparently it's the most accurate electric chiming clock. Another + for Nottingham, although it doesn't mean much nowadays!!

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On 2/7/2019 at 1:22 AM, IAN123. said:

A rather neglected looking Bobbers Mill.27750306-2072227909460131-67037011048818

My guess is this is Bobbers Mill road looking towards Radford road from near Darley road. Could this be one of Smith's old factories, checking the car number for the possible date. St Stephens church on the left skyline.

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