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Newball and Mason , herbal beers

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Never heard of them before but this attractive seasonal poster cropped up today on a Facebook page  .

 

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They did herbal ingredients for herbal beers . In the late 1800s they were at Park Place , Park Row .

 

Later in the 1950s they were at Beech Avenue , Basford and the managing director was a familiar name .....Elliott Durham .

 

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We’ll see if this gem finds its way onto NWBW David :biggrin:

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I'd never heard of them either, but in the early 1900s they were here.

 

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Forest Street - off Radford Road - was roughly where ASDA is now.

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4 minutes ago, LizzieM said:

We’ll see if this gem finds its way onto NWBW David :biggrin:

 

I had the same thought ! 

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Now  I see why we may not have heard much of the company , they moved to Staffs in 1957 .

 

This history from the National Archives :

 

 

The company of Newball and Mason was originally founded by Thomas Ayres Newball and Thomas Mason. In 1850 Thomas Ayres Newball had opened a chemist shop at 36 Derby Road, Nottingham and in c1859, at the age of fifteen, Thomas Mason became his apprentice. After several years, Thomas Mason opened his own shop on Derby Road and it was at this time that he invented the 'extract of herbs', a concentrated essence that could be made up into the non-alcoholic beverage, 'Botanic Beer'. In the 1870's the two businesses were amalgamated to form Newball and Mason, chemist and druggist, with premises near the Market Place and at 10 Derby Road (Morris's Trade Directory for 1877)

 

With the growing popularity of botanic beer, in 1875 Thomas Mason opened a factory on Park Row in Nottingham, to produce his 'extract of herbs'

 

Benjamin Deaville joined the company as an apprentice in 1880 and after serving a three year apprenticeship, he decided to concentrate on the manufacturing side of the business, later becoming a partner in the company

 

In 1890, the company moved into a larger factory on Terrace Street in Hyson Green and in 1902, they moved again to a former lace factory on Beech Avenue, New Basford. This factory was known as the 'Maville Works', combining the names of Mason and Deaville. By this time, Newball and Mason had diversified to produce not only the 'extract of herbs' but also coffee, fruit essences and flavourings, household chemicals, culinary and medicinal herbs, the latter being grown on the company's herb and fruit farm in Bunny

 

In 1911, Thomas Mason died and Benjamin Deaville became the sole proprietor. In 1925 he decided to form a private limited company and held the position of chairman and managing director until his death in 1938. The factory was then re-modelled and re-equipped with modern machinery and in 1946 the company acquired a fish canning factory in Mevagissey, Cornwall. By 1957 Newball and Mason had moved production to Sedgley in Staffordshire

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Maville Works on Beech Avenue used to be occupied by Gold and Dunn the furnishers. I remember my parents buying from them when we lived in Woodthorpe. 

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And I worked for Gold & Dunn a long time ago. !

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Stumbled across this page trying to find out more about a book I discovered in a charity shop published by Newball and Mason, Notts, in the 1850s. The book is "A Handbook to the Botanical Practice of Medicine by Dr Thomas Airey. The only info I can find on Airey are a couple of newspaper reports of a court case where he was found guilty of practicing medicine with no qualifications, his claims to be a Dr seem rather dubious. The book has a section of testimonials of patients he treated in Notts. Not sure how to share images on here, seems the file size of the photos are too large.

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24 minutes ago, john72 said:

 Not sure how to share images on here, seems the file size of the photos are too large.

 

You need to use one of the free photo-hosting sites (the main one used to be Photobucket, but you now have to pay).

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28 minutes ago, Cliff Ton said:

 

You need to use one of the free photo-hosting sites (the main one used to be Photobucket, but you now have to pay).

Thanks Cliff, just learnt a new skill!IMG%5D

 

 

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Fascinating reading. The claims and cures are typical of the day - but also funny to modern eyes.

 

I also found myself looking at the addresses of all the 'patients'; it's like a tour of the area 100 years ago.

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Newball & Mason seemed to go from strength to strength and were a local success story..things ended in 1970.54793-1-280-99999-unpad.jpgA 1927 aerial shot of the Beech Avenue works. The non- alcholic herb extract proved a big hit.Im189902-Age-Newball.jpg

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