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Re maths teaching, earlier post; The only use for higher mathematics is to be able to teach somebody else higher mathematics.  (Bertrand Russell).

I don't know what any of the Manning staff did during the war but the deputy head was so combative, I wouldn't be surprised if she didn't start it!

I don't know Jill well enough to be able to recognise her by any leg features.

There are many different versions of this hymn, Margie. The one we sang at Manning had a middle section that was set to a different melody and, strangely, not the one in our hymn book.  The tune is, supposedly, based on an ancient Celtic melody which was later transcribed for SATB, although we only sang the melody.

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On 6/8/2020 at 9:30 PM, philmayfield said:

It's a British Thornton

Bit late on this one but doing Mechanical Engineering you could not really get along without one. I had a Thornton Comprehensive slide rule. The one thing it did teach me was "order of magnitude", where to put the decimal point or how many hundreds, thousands etc were in the answer. It came to the fore many years later when mentoring some young engineers doing some stress/strain calculations, one came to me with an answer that was so obviously wrong and I told him straight away he had made an error. I did not know if the numbers were right but I knew the order of magnitude was wrong.

Moved on to a HP14? electronic calculator that cost a small fortune back in 1970. For some weird reason the input was in "reverse Polish notation". I wonder who came up with that illogical methodology? Again having used a slide rule was useful in spotting a keying error like missing a digit in the calculation.

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I had a slide rule.  It didn't make me any better at maths.  In the Coal Board labs at Cinderhill, we had one of those big cylindrical 'desk top' ones.  I never saw anyone use it.  Same difference at the time, as exists now between a tablet and a PC.:biggrin:

 

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By a strange coincidence, unaware of this post I came across my slide rules only yesterday at the back of my desk drawer. I have a British Thornton and a Japanese Hemmi. I also have a copy of school edition log tables, a reprint of the 1908 edition. We used log tables at school but not slide rules. 

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Log tables?  A complete mystery to me. A thin, paperbacked volume, dogeared from long use as a missile by Barmy Coleen. Certainly no slide rules or calculators. It was very basic at The Manning. Even the loos were emptied every night by the ten o'clock horses!

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I think that log tables and the hymn book were the only things we didn't have to hand back when we left. I still have a master key that would open any door in the school. Sadly the school has been demolished!

 

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I still have a Thornton slide rule and a calculator with reverse Polish logic.  Mind you I did have a Polish maths teacher.

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At Manning, we had a girl who could open any door in the school...with a hairpin!  At lunchtimes, all the classroom doors were locked as we were supposed to be outside in the grounds,unless fourth form or above, when we were allowed to leave the site. If it was cold, we sometimes sneaked back inside. Side doors had to be left open for access to toilets.

 

Susan, bless her, would unlock our classroom door with a hairpin and we'd silently sneak in and sit on the floor at the back of the room, with our backs against the pipes which were never more than tepid but it was better than the school field.  A staff member patrolling the quads wouldn't have been able to see us.

 

Sadly for us but happily for her, Susan left Manning in the second year. Her father was transferred to a different place of work. He was a prison officer!

 

Though we asked her to teach us the hairpin trick, Susan would not oblige. Lunchtimes were colder from then on!

 

Edited to add... it's a shame Susan wouldn't impart her knowledge of lock picking. Had she done so, I would honestly be able to say that I learned something useful at Manning!

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Our son was like that. From a very early age he was into locks and keys. He understood the workings of locks and became very adept at lock picking. Totally self taught. Whether that helps him in his legal career I'm not sure!

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