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2 hours ago, Beekay said:

Do the trams run on rails or are disguised conventional wheels. They look like they could be OO gauge, or perhaps 'N'.

they are OO gauge,1/76 scale but without motors, there is someone who has converted them to run on rails via an electric motor but it means some drastic cutting of the inside and underneath so I've not bothered going down that route, they do look good sat on some rails though as a static show, there's so much I want to do to create a roadway complete with overhead lines and track but also want to have a roadway with buildings and the more modern buses on, all this will be in my shed on some loft boards running alongside the windows as you can just make out in some of my photo's,still the roadway will be eight feet long so could possibly split it into different time periods, loads of ideas going on in me head about it at the moment, As for the reason I started the bus collection, well Not got a clue, never driven one, never worked on any and not got a clue what the different types are I just like them,

 

Rog

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Let's see if I've got this right ! Getting it all wrong.

This is only a trial mind. Hoping I've learned to post pics. Will try not to bore ya'all. B.

Miniature stools Gem. All in need of some touching up where chipped. Had em ages, butterflies too.

Just been watching ‘Money for nothing’ on BBC 1 this afternoon.  A woman rescued an old metal watering can and decorated it in Folk Art style.  Thought of you BK.  Hers didn’t look as good as yours and she made almost £400!!!

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I watched it too Margie. It looked very much like stencils, (I certainly don't think it were painted freehand). Also, it would have been better if it was the same on both sides. To be honest, I can't believe some of the prices that are charged or people are daft enough to pay. Me, I'd sooner give stuff away, that's why I never make any money. But saying that, many thanks for your vote of confidence.x

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On 11/7/2022 at 3:42 AM, plantfit said:

According to the data sheet that came with it says OB, however I don't remember the "wing" shape in the body styling towards the back of the coach as in this example

Love your work Plantfit.

Do you mean the maroon section around the rear wheel arch? If so I can't recall any Duple bodied OB without that feature. Plaxton did however produce a body with the door further forward than the Duple and without the front seat next to the driver and a chrome edge styling feature that went from the line of the windscreen, along the body side and down over the rear wheel arch. Like this one. I still recall hearing that classic transmission whine as they struggled up the hill in our village.

Bedford Motor Coach | ClassicCarWeekly.net

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On 11/7/2022 at 5:55 PM, plantfit said:

the other one (East Midland) is a PD1 both Lowbridge

The East Midland bus showing route No 3 Mansfield is in a very early East Midland Livery, Yellow Brown and Cream which was phased out in the mid 50s and became BET Dark Red. I think the old livery looks very smart.

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3 hours ago, Oztalgian said:

Love your work Plantfit.

Do you mean the maroon section around the rear wheel arch? If so I can't recall any Duple bodied OB without that feature. Plaxton did however produce a body with the door further forward than the Duple and without the front seat next to the driver and a chrome edge styling feature that went from the line of the windscreen, along the body side and down over the rear wheel arch. Like this one. I still recall hearing that classic transmission whine as they struggled up the hill in our village.

Bedford Motor Coach | ClassicCarWeekly.net

Thats the section I mean or very similar Oz,I found your post very interesting and I will try to do a bit more research into the OB, they were very stylish vehicles for the day and I know what you mean about the whining gearbox, not far from where I live it the Lincolnshire transport museum or bus museum or sommat and as yet I've not visited it but will make the effort next year for sure, they also have running days when they bring out a lot of their buses for the general public to ride on, thanks for the info you provided me with

 

Rog

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On 11/6/2022 at 5:52 PM, plantfit said:

A few more of my buses and coaches, Skills, Barton, Trent, among various others including trolly buses and Trams

I like the one back-right, it looks like a later model Burlingham Seagul. When as a kid  holidaying at Mablethorpe,  mid 1950s, I always got up early to watch the coaches being brought out of the garage on Tennyson Rd. There was regularly a red Sheffield United Tours very curvy flamboyant early model Seagul in there. It looked space age to me. More austere but well proportioned were the green Lincolnshire Road Car Bristols. 

From your collection I see a more modern Harrington Cavalier. Also 3 to the right of that a very attractive AEC half-cab, I had a dinky toys model similar to that. I thought they looked very aerodynamic but probably weren't. 

Thanks for the display Rog, surprising what triggers a host of memories.

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22 hours ago, Willow wilson said:

I like the one back-right, it looks like a later model Burlingham Seagul. When as a kid  holidaying at Mablethorpe,  mid 1950s, I always got up early to watch the coaches being brought out of the garage on Tennyson Rd. There was regularly a red Sheffield United Tours very curvy flamboyant early model Seagul in there. It looked space age to me. More austere but well proportioned were the green Lincolnshire Road Car Bristols. 

From your collection I see a more modern Harrington Cavalier. Also 3 to the right of that a very attractive AEC half-cab, I had a dinky toys model similar to that. I thought they looked very aerodynamic but probably weren't. 

Thanks for the display Rog, surprising what triggers a host of memories.

Is this one flamboyant enough for you WW, (not my picture by the way) it does look rather space age though, might make a good model conversion

 

coach.jpg

 

Rog

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A very handsome looking well proportioned coach imo Rog, apart from the fin, that's more Flash Gordon imo so probably in keeping with its era. The 1949 mk1 Burlingham Seagull (Leyland or AEC with winged sword motif on the front) was considered by many, including me, to be the best looking coachwork for a long time and sold very well.  The mk 2 and subsequent design tweaks were considered a step down, (if it ain't broke.... ) All this is highly subjective I know and opinions may vary lol.

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As soon as you mentioned Burlingham Seagull it rang a bell so I looked through my collection and came up with this

 

DSCF1682.jpg

 

DSCF1683.jpg

 

Rog

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   Sorry, I appear to be playing catch-up. Had a few issues with this site which now appears to have rectified itself.

   I like the dorsal fin fitted to Harrington bodywork. Makes them different. It was designed by Harrington to extract stale air from inside the coach as it moved.

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interesting point, never thought of that, just thought it was cosmetic but now you mention it it does make sense, thanks for the input

 

Rog

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On 11/15/2022 at 8:49 PM, plantfit said:

The OB fleet, various liveries,

Butler Brothers of Kirkby in Ashfield ran OBs until the late 60s from the Forest Folk in Blidutth through Ravenshead (Fishpool) and on to Kirkby, From memory they had a light blue and dark blue livery

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On 11/17/2022 at 7:39 AM, Dark Angel said:

    It was designed by Harrington to extract stale air from inside the coach as it moved.

Additional interesting factoid. The dorsal-fin coach introduced in 1935 has a roof and window-line which significantly curves down from half way along towards the rear, thus reducing headroom in the back of the coach. The vehicle  construction and use regulations required that floor-to-roof clearance height of the gangway be the same for the whole length of the coach. This was achieved by making a bulge in the rear roof over the gangway for legal headroom access to the back seats. The bulge was cleverly disguised by making it a fin shape design feature to include ventilation. (The exterior vent  louvres also broke up the visual impact of an otherwise slab-sided fin) Thus the sleek profile of the coach was not unduly compromised, the smokers sat at the back and everyone was happy.

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Very interesting WW, it's amazing the amount of knowledge there is in these pages no matter what the subject

 

Rog

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Been racking my brains and oiling a few cogs, still awaiting the 3 in one to work.

I know Clark’s of Epperstone ran at least one, maybe two dorsal finned coaches.

Skills I think also ran one, although not completely sure. I think Makemson’s also ran one, any recollections @Beekay?

Robin Hood coaches may also have had a couple.

 

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DA., no recollections I'm afraid, but then again I went to drive them. Didn't bother looking at the roof, just a quick check over before departing.

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