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Spot on Ben. No one can turn me on just with a vulgar comment ! Anyway, I've always been shy !

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True, Ben. Sadly, some people of both genders don't know when they've crossed the line. They don't even know the line exists!

 

I've been accused, in my time, of being anti male. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, I get on better with men than women due to the absence of bitchiness in men.

 

What I won't tolerate is being regarded as a piece of meat in the butcher's window and, during my working life, I've met many males who think it's acceptable. I've never hesitated to impress upon them that it isn't.

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The trouble is for men these days is that you’ve only got to look at a woman to be accused of being a pervert and put on the sex offenders register. As for talking to a child or patting it on the head - don’t even go there! How do people get to meet with the opposite sex (or should it be the same sex!) these days. I suppose it’s all done through dating sites where all participants have a common agenda.

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After leaving our Beer Off in the 1980s I still needed to earn money, so took up a counter assistant position in a town center Butchers shop. There was sexual harassment  on a daily basis, not only that but bullying as well. We had a large walk in Fridge freezer by the shop floor. It was guaranteed that if you had to go in there, one of the male butchers would run in and shut the door. I will leave the rest to your imagination.

 

You may think 'Why not report it'? To be honest, no point, you might as well leave the job as you would be shunned or laughed at for being a prude. We had one particular Butcher who was about 6ft 5in and well over 20stone, ( No problem there, if he had  had a few manners )he would come to the counter with a tray of meat to stock up, he didn't say excuse me, but would just side shove you out of the way, no contest, being 5ft 2in and half his weight. 

 

I don't think for one minute they would get away with it today.

 

 

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I think the problem back then - and if it still exists today - is that the men involved see it as "..oh, it's just a bit of fun, having a laugh". 

 

Which is not how the person on the receiving end sees it.

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That's fair enough, provided the males concerned are prepared to accept being kicked in the testicles or having a sharp object thrust in them as part of the fun. The thing is, they don't! Tough. If you can't take it, don't dish it out. :Shock:

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There is a hell of a difference between banter and harassment and its about time some people understood this. There is no justification what so ever for harassment , you have to know the person well before you start banter as they may consider it harassment  and you must respect that persons views. 

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Correct there Trogg, I had a manager who thought it was funny to wrestle some of the guys and draw rude pictures on their foreheads or bare backs with felt tip pens,when reported and challenged about his behaviour he said it was just banter,it was not, it was a form of bullying,degrading and humiliating to the other person,tried it once with me ( I was his assistant manager) but after shoving him up against the wall and threatening to rip his throat out (no witnesses) I said to him "whats up mate it's only banter" he never tried it again. I aint no snowflake or do-gooder but I do have respect for others

 

Rog

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Don't get me wrong: I am no advocate of violence in any form. However, if someone invades my personal space without my permission and is intending actions of which I don't approve, I am going to protect myself and use any means to do so. In my view, everyone has that right. If it results in injury to the perpetrator, hard cheese. Might make them think twice next time.

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As that American kept saying of England yesterday.  No guns.

Whatever one thinks about that there are some here and even the ladies can pack a small weapon.  I don't advocate gun violence but a guy better be careful.  That act of harassment could be the last thing he does. The law would almost certainly side with the victim.

I tend to keep my distance from all ladies and I don't make smart remarks.  I'm a bit long in the tooth for all that anyway.

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I never took you as a snowflake anyway Jill. smile2

 

When I went on NCT in the 70s & women bus drivers were joining the ranks we alway's pulled the handbrake on that extra notch !

Many times they had to go to the depot & ask a fitter to release the handbrake for them, bit of fun but certainly no sexual harrassment from anyone.

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I sometimes despair of the younger generation of women, it seems the slightest thing is classed as sexual harrassment. Are all the younger generation of women so spineless that a wolf whistle can cause mental distress. When I was younger it was more upsetting not to get one when you walked past a building site together with the ensuing retort. Perhaps my generation were bought up tougher than the present one. I am in no way minimising real harrassment of any kind but come on ladies (and some gentlemen) get a grip and stop crying wolf so real harrassment can be investigated.

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My dad died when I was 10 and he 79, which meant he was born in 1876, right in the middle of the reign of Queen Victoria. Whilst no means a cruel father, he was certainly a strict disciplinarian, believing in the principal that children should be seen and not heard. His attitude towards women was unwavering, they were the fairer sex and placed on a pedestal. My upbringing therefor proved ideal preparation for the rigours at the Mellish but hardly for the working environment of the swinging sixties. My first job was in the Export Department of Raleigh Industries, an office full of mainly young ladies, and me the veritable fish out of the water.I have no doubt they would have been kind to me, but I was so painfully shy, I can not remember having a conversation with any of them. I must have shown some early initiative because I was given the job of sorting out the filing system and in consequence, unfettered access to all the side offices. I threw open the door of what I thought was an empty office and lying on a desk was a young lady  having her boobs inked with a map of the world. Now I could not say if she was enjoying the experience or not but she certainly was making no attempt to get up. I made a speedy about turn and fled the scene. Should I have reported the matter to the Office Manager? Would that not have caused the young lady, complicit or not, a great deal of embarrassment? What a contrast to the prevailing attitudes of today!

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Ian , although the name Walter Outram does resonate with me, I don`t know why or where but, bear in mind I left Cussons in April 1971, so he could have worked there after I departed. 

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For a long period of my life I was an inveterate giver of lifts. On one occasion, having worked late, I called into the local KFC to buy a peace offering. As I came out of the shop there was a young girl stood by the door crying and I ascertained her date had let her down and she was stranded. Ever the gentleman I offered her a lift home. The young lady lived in an area of Manchester with which I was totally unfamiliar and although her directions got us to her house I became absolutely lost on the way home. When I did eventually arrive home I received a rollicking for being far later than I said I would be and another one for the fried chicken being cold. Driving back to Nottingham on my own, very late one night I picked up two young girl hitch hikers. Although nothing amiss happened I realised after I had dropped them off just how vulnerable I was to all sorts of accusations, particularly with their being two of them,. so  I stopped giving lifts. A shame but probably the safest option. 

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Blimey Geoffrey, you got out alive then ?  LOL. Smashing little pub though, sitting outside on a summers evening.

A real cross section of civilisation without a doubt. Great cobs too.

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Haven't set foot in the Pear Tree since around 1969.  I recall it was a nice little place.  Went there to meet up with a lad from Boowul who I didn't see again for 50 years, but now regularly see in Boowul Wethies.. when I'm home.

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2 hours ago, Geoffrey Dennis said:

For a long period of my life I was an inveterate giver of lifts. On one occasion, having worked late, I called into the local KFC to buy a peace offering. As I came out of the shop there was a young girl stood by the door crying and I ascertained her date had let her down and she was stranded. Ever the gentleman I offered her a lift home. The young lady lived in an area of Manchester with which I was totally unfamiliar and although her directions got us to her house I became absolutely lost on the way home. When I did eventually arrive home I received a rollicking for being far later than I said I would be and another one for the fried chicken being cold. Driving back to Nottingham on my own, very late one night I picked up two young girl hitch hikers. Although nothing amiss happened I realised after I had dropped them off just how vulnerable I was to all sorts of accusations, particularly with their being two of them,. so  I stopped giving lifts. A shame but probably the safest option. 

 

It was a 'dodgy' business.  Around 1968, me and my mate John were hitching back from Wales and stuck on the A50 near Uttoxeter.  ( Or 'Uxter'.as the locals called it.)  A young girl in a mini pulled up and we got in.  I was the lucky one and got to sit in the front seat. This young lady was totally stunning.  Slim and blond, wearing a knitted pale cream dress at 'mini' length. There would have been somethng seriously wrong with me if I'd not noticed that she was gorgeous.  Naturally, John and I were true Gents thoughout and she dropped us in the centre of Nottm close to the Council House, but I doubt I'll ever forget that journey.  There can't have been so many young girls driving alone back in 1968.

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DJ360  I do not believe any red blooded man will ever stop appreciating a good looking woman whilst still having a breath in his body. However it is always look but don`t touch and adherence to the principal that a woman has the absolute right to say NO and mean it.

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I have never subscribed to the belief that the British Worker is basically lazy as portrayed for example, in the film ,I`m All Right Jack. In my experience  the willingness to work is particularly endemic in the female of the species.There are inevitably boring aspects to a lot of jobs on a production line but this boredom can be some what alleviated by job rotation. Being busy makes the time fly by and whilst I was never so naive to believe the girls would not snatch a  break when they could, generally speaking they would quickly bring a breakdown to my attention. Thereby lay a problem, how do you enter a confined space, filled with female bodies in order to  investigate the cause of the stoppage? My strategy was to enter the area with my hands at chest height palms facing outwards, visually saying to the girls, I`m coming in but I`m not going to touch you. This worked for me. 

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Most of my 28 years at Plessey were on a PBR (Paid by Results) scheme. Laziness was unheard of, when people's wages almost trebled.

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5 minutes ago, Geoffrey Dennis said:

I have never subscribed to the belief that the British Worker is basically lazy as portrayed for example, in the film ,I`m All Right Jack.

You obviously never worked in the docks or the car industry in the days of Red Robbo and his ilk.

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39 minutes ago, Geoffrey Dennis said:

.There are inevitably boring aspects to a lot of jobs on a production line but this boredom can be some what alleviated by job rotation.

 

Consider myself very lucky that i never had a boring job........enjoyed all my working life.......mixing with all sorts of people,,and travelling the length and breadth of mainland Britain,,,

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