Words you dislike ?


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I have had to relent a little in my dislike of a certain word, which has crept in to being. Not the actual word, but the way it is often used these days. Mainly when being served in restaurants.

I give up.

Far too many brain-grinding words in common use English now that I have to make a real effort not to despair.   English is effectively a foreign language to me now and I have to think before

Proper, when the person should be using PROPERLY !

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Words I really dislike: "Like" when used several times iin a sentence; "Absolutely" when the word yes is more appropriate and "Cool" or "Kewl" when used at any time other than to describe a state of heat.

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  • 5 months later...

Just lately I’ve noticed lots of people being interviewed on TV begin sentences with “So” and it really bugs me, just like as Compo states above “Absolutely” is used far too much, although it’s very often professional footballers who say it during post-match interviews, most of these young men aren’t too bright anyway.

I also read in recent days a transcript of a speech given by (Prince) Harry , where he used the word “gotten” ....... what’s that all about then, has he quickly become Americanized?  

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1 hour ago, LizzieM said:

Just lately I’ve noticed lots of people being interviewed on TV begin sentences with “So” and it really bugs me,

 

TV and radio. It's really infuriating and reached epidemic proportions . There's a whole generation who now start every sentence with 'So'. I've switched off radio programmes because of it.

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So, I'm amazed how you've all  taken so long before you've gotten absolutely apoplectic about this. The 'so' thing has been going of for years and seems to be an almost direct replacement for the [Aussie Mode] 'rising inflection'? [/Aussie Mode]  (Yes.. that is a question mark, not an exclamation..  ;))

 

Lizzie, the footy mob always amuse me and it's not just players.. the managers and the pundits are all guilty too.  Just a few from recent years... 

 

-Suddenly they are now obliged to preface any mention of any club with 'football' so that they now have to say 'the football club'.. as if we all might mistakenly think they are talking about a Darby and Joan Club.

- 'He's a good strong boy..'  Now largely replaced by 'He's got a good engine'..

-'It's a game of two halves'..  No S¬!t Sherlock!

-- 'pressing'  Wot's that then?

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On 1/26/2020 at 6:49 PM, Cliff Ton said:

 

TV and radio. It's really infuriating and reached epidemic proportions . There's a whole generation who now start every sentence with 'So'. I've switched off radio programmes because of it.

What bugs me is when they put the credits in the corner of the screen to advertise the next programme.I some times actually want to check some ones  name or see when it was made, its bad enough full screen the speed they display them and the date.

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On 1/26/2020 at 5:45 PM, LizzieM said:

Just lately I’ve noticed lots of people being interviewed on TV begin sentences with “So” and it really bugs me

There is a chap I follow on YouTube. Makes videos about computing which I am very into. He is very professional and produces excellent material but says ‘so’ so often at the start of a sentence it sends my mad. I could strangle the so and so.

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I got into the habit of calling films Movies in Australia, same with crisps, they usually called them chips or chippies, and big rigs were called Semi's or prime movers for the tractor only.

I was pretty "Americanized" before I even left Australia for the states.

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  • 11 months later...

I would like to see the phrase “Socially Distancing” & “Underlining Health Issues” erased from from the English language, I cringed when I see or hear it used. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Many years ago my English teacher told the class " there is no such word in the English langwidge as 'GOT', I usually try not to use it but as Compo say's there are times when you just have to! The worst culprit I know is Alexander Armstrong on the TV program 'Pointless' when he turns round saying "and on the board we have GOT......",  

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That used to be a halfway decent show but inane banter between Armstrong and Osman leaves a lot to be desired. I've stopped watching it.

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Television influences our language in many ways. I remember Bruce Forsyth introducing someone (an American 'trend spotter'), on a TV show who said the next trend would be using the word 'together'. It sounded totally alien the way he used it and Bruce did not seem at all convinced however the guy was right and now we don't think twice about it.

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HOWEVER...

Mrs WB watches the shows where so called celebrities compete. Cooking, dancing, ice skating, sewing etc.

The judges say something nice but then say HOWEVER and then start picking faults.

Mrs WB has had enough and has finally learnt how to use SKYQ and records everything so she can fast forward through the judges bit.

HOWEVER, she still watches the damn programmes.

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Yip Yep Yup.......shuuuuuuush.......and kids using big words............

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