Words you dislike ?


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I have had to relent a little in my dislike of a certain word, which has crept in to being. Not the actual word, but the way it is often used these days. Mainly when being served in restaurants.

 

I was born a girl, was a girl when I married my husband. Still am. Years have passed and now I am an 'Old Girl! 

 

Why in my 70s have I suddenly become   'A Guy'? I know hormones have a lot of explaining to do as we woman pass a certain age but come on, not that much.  

 

When sitting at our table awaiting supper, and the happy smiling person, notebook in hand approaches for our order, And says 'Hi Guys, How are you doing and what can I get for you tonight. I don't want to ruin the day for them, so I just smile sweetly, then run to the 'Powder Room' to check for whiskers!!! :rolleyes:

 

PS. Yes......There are a few.xx

.

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I have had to relent a little in my dislike of a certain word, which has crept in to being. Not the actual word, but the way it is often used these days. Mainly when being served in restaurants.

I give up.

Far too many brain-grinding words in common use English now that I have to make a real effort not to despair.   English is effectively a foreign language to me now and I have to think before

Another one of those dreadful Americanisms creeping In but we have to accept that language is continually changing. When I was at primary school some of the posher kids used to have elocution lessons to ‘learn them ow to talk proppa’, and that was in Woodthorpe where everyone ‘talked proppa’ in those days. There were no television soaps to influence the language and people on the radio, especially newsreaders, spoke in ‘Received Pronunciation’ or the Queens English. I like to hear dialects but I do dislike ‘lazy talk’.

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27 minutes ago, carni said:

 

 

When sitting at our table awaiting supper, and the happy smiling person, notebook in hand approaches for our order, And says 'Hi Guys, How are you doing and what can I get for you tonight. 

.

ABSOLUTELY ......... 

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1 hour ago, carni said:

I was born a girl, was a girl when I married my husband. Still am.

In this day and age it's nice to be certain of something carni.  There's a quote I heard recently that the youngsters now days are not sure if they're a boy, a girl or a $!£%$% toaster...

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54 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

Another one of those dreadful Americanisms creeping In but we have to accept that language is continually changing. 

 

I can't stand the use of the word 'Movie' for what is clearly a film.

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'Guys' is standard over here.  I don't like it when used to mixed company.  I've often wondered if it descended form the Jewish term, 'Goys' used of Gentiles.

The term 'Youse Goys'  (New York slang)  Could have easily become, "You guys' over the years.  Bit like Blokes, in the UK and Aus' shouldn't be applied to the ladies though.

 

Movies, has been the standard term for the cinema in North America as long as I have been here.  Simply moving pictures recorded on film.   Do they even use film anymore?  Even so called movies are digitized and played on a digital projector today.

 

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'Basically', adds no value.

 

Starting a sentence with 'Look' or 'Listen' (favourite with politicians).

 

'Sat' when the correct word is 'sitting' (he was sat on the bench).

 

'Off of'

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I object to being greeted by " can I help you babe?". To start with I am old enough to be the spotty individual's grandad and secondly, if my memory serves me correctly, Babe was a pig. Even if you ignore the greeting and ask a question invariably they have not got a clue about what is being sold.

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It doesn’t worry me but Paul always comments when some person being interviewed on TV says ‘the AMOUNT of people ....”

it should be “the NUMBER of people ....” he says

 

I suppose that’s not exactly a word he dislikes, though, it’s a phrase.

 

It gets to me very slightly when people say “different TO” instead of “different FROM”.
I think that must have been drummed into me at some point in an English lesson

 

But I do accept that language changes over the years, so I try very hard to ignore it, as in the grand scheme of things it really doesn’t matter at all (does it?)
 

 

 

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What about using ‘fast’ as an adverb instead of an adjective?

E.g.  the car went fast (instead of ‘quickly’)

or is that acceptable these days?

 

I’m not going to say anything else

as I feel I’m getting a bit picky now ...

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I've noticed lately how curmudgeonly I've become - ranting at the radio on a daily basis now. People starting sentences with the word "so", seasoned presenters repeating the first three words of their sentence before finishing it, and many more.

I would bet anyone under thirty to get through an entire day without using the word "like" . My money would be safe before five minutes were up.

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8 hours ago, oldphil said:

seasoned presenters repeating the first three words of their sentence before finishing it, and many more.

I totally agree oldphil. Here in Australia it has become pollie speak as they all have to say the three word message twice. I am sure that it is because they think the voters are a thick as they are.

 

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On 1/27/2020 at 7:54 PM, carl hebb said:

What bugs me is when they put the credits in the corner of the screen to advertise the next programme.I some times actually want to check some ones  name or see when it was made, its bad enough full screen the speed they display them and the date.

I think that is a whole new topic altogether 

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All words where the speaker misses out the letter 'T', for example, "Off to Brigh'on " or even worse, I fink instead think. Not forgetting LOL.

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4 hours ago, Oztalgian said:

"Wanna" instead of want to, I heard it used on our ABC TV yesterday, the last bastion of received pronunciation

And, apparently, according to the presenters, we live in the "East Mids". They have "celebs". But, for sheer, unadulterated stupidity you cannot beat the frantic attempts to cram all the legally required terms and conditions into the final three seconds of the advertisment (I avoided "advert" deliberately). More serious, though, are the pathetic attempts by the gambling and drinking sites exhorting us to be "gamble aware" and "drink responsibly". They are on screen for the blink of an eye.

I feel a separate thread looming here!

PS: the jab yesterday was Oxford AZ. Comes from a site in Liverpool (Medimmune) Told me to ignore the statistics - in three weeks it will stop me getting anything worse than a heavy cold. The gentleman vaccinating me said he wasn't a registered clinician. I told him it would be beast to keep that to himself until he'd done the deed. Turns out that he is a vet; cue a few remarks about the size of needle and where his hands were yesterday.

Happy to report, good night's sleep and no side effects yet.

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