colly0410

How to make Notts tea...

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Bung a teabag in a mug, pour on boiling watter (has to be watter not that poncy water that non Notts people use) bung in half to 3 spoons of sugar, pour in milk & stir, don't forget to throw away the teabag, enjoy... Under no circumstances must a teapot & china cups & saucers be used, these are for poncy non Notts .people who know no better... P.S. Milk & sugar can be combined if condensed milk is used, You can also spoon condensed milk straight into your mouth, this is totally delicious...    

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Strictly Earl Grey in a china cup here with just two drops of milk and the tiniest bit of sugar - but each to their own. My wife drinks ‘common’ tea from a mug as she’s not as refined as me.:biggrin:

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That sounds really disgusting, colly!   But also funny :rotfl:

 

I always use a teapot, a china mug (don't like cups and saucers) put milk in the mug before pouring the tea in, and I couldn't drink it if it had sugar in!  I also don't like strong tea ... I like the "surely you don't like it THAT WEAK"  kind of tea.... and it should be decaffeinated as well.

 

HOWEVER, I would enjoy condensed milk straight from a spoon (sticky milk our kids called it) ... used to make sandwiches with it inside!

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When I was young my parents always made tea using one of these. In those days I never understood what it did or how it worked.

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When I came here to meet my future in laws, my MIL made me some chamomile tea. I thought it was just a tea that smelt a bit different.I asked for milk in it and I saw the look on her face.( This girls strange ) anyway she put some milk in it and watched me drink it. It was awful. I later found out chamomile tea is drunk black with either honey or sugar and a twist of lemon, I'm still not convinced. But she got use to my " strange " ways and loved me to bits and I her.

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I can't stand tea, so never drink it.  My Mum and Dad drank gallons of the stuff, though - generally Typhoo with sterilised milk (yuk!).  It had to be strong, otherwise it was described as Mazzewatter, which they must have thought of as weak (after an actual tea brand, Mazawattee). I still use that word now if I see someone drinking weak tea

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Milk was only put in first in the early days, when using finest bone China. The reason being, the China was very fragile and could crack or even shatter when boiling tea added. So milk was added first to take the edge off hot tea. I were always led to believe " you can't take milk out but you can allus put a bit more in". Now the advert- Best tea is Yorkshire tea, hotly followed by Dorset. Just as long as the cup/beaker is wide enough to dunk your Rich Tea !

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CT, not seen one of those for years! We had one too. At one point, we had a tea dispenser which was fixed to the kitchen wall. A bit like a soap dispenser but filled with tea. One held the teapot underneath and pushed the button the requisite number of times, then added hot water. This was prior to teabags.

 

My mother didn't like the dispenser but it was a birthday present from one of her friends and mum didn't want to offend her by not using it. The friend was also very fond of Tupperware, which mum detested and wouldn't have in the house!

 

Mum was a stickler for bone China cups and saucers. She would drink from nothing else. If going anywhere she suspected there wouldn't be any, she took her own with her.

 

Tea? Can't stand the stuff.

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ah tupperware withe ergonomically designed cruet that fell over when you took the pepper out and the salt overbalaced it

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1 hour ago, Cliff Ton said:

When I was young my parents always made tea using one of these. In those days I never understood what it did or how it worked.

 

Grandma had one, called it a 'forcer'. Used only when the requirement was for one cup. I never got the hang as I always assumed you had to fill it, trust me you don't.

2 hours ago, colly0410 said:

boiling watter (has to be watter not that poncy water that non Notts people use

 I bet you are on't border Colly. proper tea mekin has boilin watter not your poncy boiling variety!   ;)

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Yes Brew I lived in Langley Mill when I was a kid & still say "watter" Granddad would always say it & he'd lived in Langley Mill & Heanor most of his life... 

 

My Late Mam always drank tea from a china cup & saucer, I'd torment her by caller her "your majesty" & bowing & scraping to her, I'd get a shouting at off her as she was not a royalist. She drank Hornimans tea, that name used to make me laugh as a kid as I'd interpret it as horny man, cue more shouting for being rude, lol...  

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You're a Derbyshire lad, Colly! What would you know about Nottingham tea?  Ayner, indeed!!

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Jill. I was born on Waterway Street (or is that Watterway Street? Lol) in the Meadows, then moved to Gotham, then Langley Mill, then back to the Meadows, then Chester-Le-Street Co Durham, then back to the Meadows, then Bestwood Village. All this before I left school so not really sure where I come from sometimes. I'm a member of the Meadows, Langley Mill & Bestwood Village facebook pages... 

 

Best tea I've ever tasted in when I've been on army exercise's when I  was freezing cold, knackered, fed up & whinging like Alf Garnet. It'd be dozens of tea bags in a pillow case chucked in a vat of boiling water then several tins of condensed milk poured in, pillow case would be fished out & tea ladled into our mugs, was most delicious...   

 

 

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How many schools did you go to , colly?    My Paul went to 6 schools, I think.  He says it was not good moving around so much as the curriculum was often different in each school and he kept getting lost in the secondary schools.  These days, new students are given a ' buddy' to show them around and make them feel welcome but sadly, that wasn't the case 60 - 70 years ago.  

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Tea only came in a chipped white enamel mug with blue edging, so strong that the spoon stood up on its' own after you put the obligatory three sugars in. Milk, stera, came from a Camp coffee bottle, cant be abiding that stuff that the spoggies have drunk thru the foil tops. The watter came straight from the rainwatter tank and was boiled in a pan on a small calor gas stove.

At least it did when I had a cup with my Grandad at his allotment where I loved eating the raw vegetables freshly dug or picked. My favourites were of course peas, then broad beans, brussell sprouts and carrots, the odd piece of turnip or parsnip never went amiss too.

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Tea in enamel  mugs... you soon learned to blow it first or let cool awhile before you drank it.

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Once went to a 40s tribute at Chatham docks. There was a NAAFI tea wagon serving tea in enamel mugs, along with camp coffee and condensed milk. They also served lovely scones, "made from Acorns "! Never seen the like before.

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Ah, the NAAFI. My father used to say they did their best to poison the troops. My mother was in the NAAFI from October 1944 until the end of WW2, based at Garratts Hay near Woodhouse Eaves.  After her initial dismay at sleeping in a Nissen hut and being given responsibility for making the fire in the pot bellied stove, she had a good time of it and made lots of friends.  They had to open the canteen in the evenings and mornings were spent getting food ready but afternoons were free time when they all went to the cinema.

 

One good thing about NAAFI life was that they never went hungry, unlike some of her friends in the ATS who lived on bread and jam. NAAFI girls also got the pick of any makeup or toiletries delivered to the canteen for sale to troops stationed nearby.

 

For the whole of their married life, my father always quipped, "Here she comes with her ersatz coffee!" whenever mum emerged from the kitchen with a tray!

 

Mum thought the NAAFI uniform was drab and persuaded her brother who was in the army to get her a battle top with shiny brass buttons. She had this tailored to fit her by a local tailoress on Bobbers Mill Road. No one said anything so uniform inspections must have been fairly relaxed.

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13 hours ago, MargieH said:

How many schools did you go to , colly?    My Paul went to 6 schools, I think.  He says it was not good moving around so much as the curriculum was often different in each school and he kept getting lost in the secondary schools.  These days, new students are given a ' buddy' to show them around and make them feel welcome but sadly, that wasn't the case 60 - 70 years ago.  

 

Started at Gothem infants then (in no particular order) Aldercar & another one in Langley Mill, one in Chester-Le-Street,  Collygate, Trent Bridge juniors & seniors in the Meadows, & Beardall Street Hucknal. So 8 altogether. I left & came back to Trent  Bridge juniors a couple of times. When I moved to Chetser-Le-Street no one could understand my Nottingham/Derbyshire accent, when I moved back to Nottingham no one could understand my Geordie accent... 

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In the 60's NCB Canteen tea tasted exactly the same from pit to pit, we assumed the staff had been in a secret training facility where they all passed the NCB degree course on tea making. I won't say what pitmen said about canteen tea, it's a little overboard and crude....LOL

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1 hour ago, colly0410 said:

 

Started at Gothem infants then (in no particular order) Aldercar & another one in Langley Mill, one in Chester-Le-Street,  Collygate, Trent Bridge juniors & seniors in the Meadows, & Beardall Street Hucknal. So 8 altogether. I left & came back to Trent  Bridge juniors a couple of times. When I moved to Chetser-Le-Street no one could understand my Nottingham/Derbyshire accent, when I moved back to Nottingham no one could understand my Geordie accent... 

 

Colly, do you have actual dreams/nightmares about being lost or anxious in unfamiliar  schools?  Paul does!

 

He says that when he was in a new large secondary school and there was the usual change of classroom at the end of a lesson,  he daren't call in to the toilet on the way because he didn't know which classroom to go to.   Very stressful.    Also, he felt he was always doing 'catch up' in some subjects, for example being put in a Latin class - which he had never done before - alongside students who had been doing it for a year already.

 

Going to so many schools obviously impacted on the friendships he made as well.   I still have some friends from Primary School as well as Secondary.   He doesn't....

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What I  remember about pit canteens were at Bestwood, back  in 58/59. Used to love a mug of tea and the chips, ooooh, lovely chips, especially on a Friday  when I'd  been paid. If I  were really flush, it would be a mug of tea and two custard tarts.

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3 hours ago, colly0410 said:

 

Started at Gothem infants then (in no particular order) Aldercar & another one in Langley Mill, one in Chester-Le-Street,  Collygate, Trent Bridge juniors & seniors in the Meadows, & Beardall Street Hucknal. So 8 altogether. I left & came back to Trent  Bridge juniors a couple of times. When I moved to Chetser-Le-Street no one could understand my Nottingham/Derbyshire accent, when I moved back to Nottingham no one could understand my Geordie accent... 

What were it Colly? Keeping one step ahead of the law.:ph34r:

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3 hours ago, MargieH said:

 

Colly, do you have actual dreams/nightmares about being lost or anxious in unfamiliar  schools?  Paul does!

 

He says that when he was in a new large secondary school and there was the usual change of classroom at the end of a lesson,  he daren't call in to the toilet on the way because he didn't know which classroom to go to.   Very stressful.    Also, he felt he was always doing 'catch up' in some subjects, for example being put in a Latin class - which he had never done before - alongside students who had been doing it for a year already. 

 

I got behind with subjects with all the swapping about with schools, I didn't learn to read till I was 10 when Miss Slack at Trent Bridge took me under her wing, I spent the next few years catching up. I was a regular at Wilford Grove library, most books I borrowed were  on science, my interest in quantum physics started when my cousin (who I went to Aldercar school with & who went to Nottingham uni, she's got a BA in chemistry) gave me a big stack of new scientist mags that I read from end to end. I'd then borrow NS from the library.  I received a prize for progress while in Miss Slack's class at TB. The most traumatic change was when I came back to Meadows from Chester-Le-Street & my old friends didn't want to know me, took ages before things returned to normal'ish...  

 

 

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