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As winter will soon be with us I decided to try some porridge for breakfast. It was absolutely disgusting but I pretended to enjoy it as my wife has bought me a one and a half kilo bag. No wonder the Scots are so bloody dour. I wonder if the birds will enjoy it?

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I make mine with half milk,  half water. Then add a few raisins and chopped walnuts. Finally a splash of golden syrup. I actually make just the porridge x4, then put individual portions in tupperware in the fridge and zap 1 each morning. Only 1 messy saucepan to wash then. I'm all for an easy life!

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We love porridge.  
Phil, Are you using the proper oats - not that fine powdery stuff that you make with milk in the microwave?  
I cook the oats in water only, but add some milk to cool it a bit when I serve it.  Like katyjay, I add extra stuff as well - raisins, honey and sometimes fresh fruit.

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We have porridge every other day throughout the year. Weetabix or Shredded Wheat alternated. 'Er indoors put banana and prunes on her dish, me, I just have a spot of honey.

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Porridge I have is quite nice.it's in little packets you chuck in a bowl, add milk, nuke it for 2 minutes and add sugar to taste. Aldibix and Shreddded Wheat are also on the menu but other than sugar I add nothing. Of course once in a blue moon when I've earned enough brownie points I have the ultimate - a full English...

Having said that just lately I've been going to bed late, getting up late and going straight to lunch!

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Bowl of Kellogg’s Fruit’n Fibre half five every morning, six o’clock TomTit, regular as clockwork.

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I can remember my mum getting a porridger (at least that is what she called it). It consisted of 2 saucepans, the bottom one had water put in it and then the porridge oats etc were put in the other one and then slotted into the lower one, if that makes sense.

When I came down for breakfast my heart would sink when I saw it on the stove. I detested the stuff, it was always lumpy and tasteless. Looked like polyfilla on the plate, grey and disgusting. I have tried the microwave stuff which is okay but I prefer my shreddies or muesli.

I did however like the “raw” oats just mixed with sugar, one of my friends mum used to give us some as a snack. 

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That contraption is used to prevent the porridge burning in direct contact with the heat.  I'm not a porridge fan although I did have Ready Brek as a child but I think it was just that it was in separate packets which was a novelty.  Tried it since but it doesn't taste the same.

 

Oats are best in flapjacks...with choccy on the top!

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Phil, if you're watching your glucose levels, you can't go wrong with original porridge oats. They have a very slow sugar release during the day.

If cooked right, they're very good for you. B.

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10 hours ago, Stavertongirl said:

I can remember my mum getting a porridger (at least that is what she called it). It consisted of 2 saucepans, the bottom one had water put in it and then the porridge oats etc were put in the other one and then slotted into the lower one, if that makes sense.

When I came down for breakfast my heart would sink when I saw it on the stove. I detested the stuff, it was always lumpy and tasteless. Looked like polyfilla on the plate, grey and disgusting. I have tried the microwave stuff which is okay but I prefer my shreddies or muesli.

I did however like the “raw” oats just mixed with sugar, one of my friends mum used to give us some as a snack. 

It is called a porringer.

 

Regards,Will2017

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Haaa! Porridge :) Have it every morning. Half water and milk. 3 min 800 micro. Leave it for half and hour or so. Stir and micro for another 2 min. Add raisins and honey......perfect, especially following a bit of indoor rowing.

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Tells you how tasteless it is, so you've got to add raisins, walnuts, golden syrup, honey, fresh fruit, banana, prunes & sugar to make it edible, I feel sorry for Goldilocks :crazy:  

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In my case the addition of honey and raisins is to add natural and essential nutrients. It works for me - 82 and no heath issues other than arthritis (legacy from many cycling accidents). 

 

I was reminded of breakfasts at Pipewood camp (another active thread) where porridge was served each morning. There was no sugar available, just salt. At the first opportunity after arrival some of us would walk to a little shop in Hamstal Ridware and buy a tin of Tate & Lyle  golden syrup. That made the 'orrible' porridge acceptable :)

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Salt in porridge? Why?  I've mentioned previously that I don't keep salt in the house. Never use it in cooking or on my food.  We need a certain amount, it's true, but there is salt in virtually everything these days which makes it hard to avoid.  I can't imagine it would do much for porridge.

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Ready Break  just heat milk mix it in add a spoonful jam. Easy Peasy

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I don't eat Ready Brek but I do wonder why some are so disparaging of convienience food. As far as I can recall when the kids had it tasted like porridge to me depending on the amount of milk used to make it. When they were small and we both worked anything that made getting them up, breakfasted and off to school easier was a godsend.

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Not knocking it Brew. Just saying it's nothing like porridge. Following the instructions, it's more like a paste, ie a Farleys rusk. I've tried it thinking it would be a time saver, ( before microwaves) but found it to be too sweet even without anything added. When you look on the shelves, they're there with honey, syrup, chocolate, fruits etc., all additives. A bit like these coffee sachets, latte, capuchinno etc., all chemicals. At least porridge has a bit of body, a real stomach liner. I believe it's our Scottish cousins who prefer a pinch of salt on their porridge, not like us Sassenachs , who put sweeteners on ours. Join me in a cup of tea and slice of porridge. :rolleyes:

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I love porridge with a spoon of syrup but ive only got half a jar left from buying a 5 litre one. ( baking i use a lot especially at christmas making Gingerbread houses) Decided to make an order to British Corner Shop. I made out an order but the two products I really wanted were out of stock. Tate & Lyle golden syrup and Birds custard powder. I looked on Amazon and found Syrup but at a price. Small tins were so expensive and the carriage was even more expensive ending up as about €20 + for a small tin. Certainly not worth it but i'll try in a few weeks to see if they have it in stock.

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Our local 99c Store has had Heinz Baked Beans in this last week. Normally to buy a 15oz. can from the local supermarket is over $3. I never buy at that price. The 99c Store, I'd say 99% of the stuff is actually 99c, the rest maybe $1.99. These cans of beans are $1.99 but each one weighs 2.62kg. They are whoppers. I have got stocked up for us,  and the kids when I see them.

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