Recommended Posts

I know its not every ones favorite but i have a 'labour saving' front lawn, it's on plenty of sand plus a membrane and is 5 years old. While sweeping some debris off it I noticed i now have several patches of moss, the stiff brush helped but its definitely not labour saving. Does anyone have an answer Please?

Link to post
Share on other sites

While out delivering my parcels, I delivered a parcel to a regular customer (that I know has artificial grass) a parcel that went 'glug glug'. (It was square and I thought it might be a bottle of Jack Daniels). Customer answered the door and I said 'this parcel goes glug glug.' She says 'yes its weed killer for my lawn.' So I says 'but you have artificial grass.' She says 'Yes but you still can get weeds coming through.' Apparently weeds and moss are normal and the weed killer I was delivering was a special week formula that doesn't discolour the artificial grass. 

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

How very environmentally friendly!  Plastic grass kept clean with chemicals.

 

I hate it when people cover their little plot with concrete or chippings.. but I hate plastic grass even more.  Even the 'best' stuff is so obviously fake that you might as well resort to concrete.

I suppose it's only a matter of time before folks start buying plastic trees, which don't impose the inconvenience of dropping leaves.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have got artificial grass around our pool, a lot of visitors think it is real and ask how we stop the chlorine in the pool water killing the grass. Yes you do get the odd weed in it especially around the edges I just pull them out. It gets full sun almost all day so we don't get any issues with moss.

It is softer on bare feet than most of the grasses that can survive our hot summers but can be hot on the feet on a 40 degree day.

Some of the plastic plants that you can get these days are very realistic and if the plastic in them has the correct amount of UV stabiliser in it they last for many years even under our harsh sun. You don't have to water them except for a quick hose down to remove any dust now and then, never need pruning and don't drop leaves everywhere. What can be wrong with that?

By the way DJ360 did you have a real Christmas tree?

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DJ360 said:

How very environmentally friendly!  Plastic grass kept clean with chemicals.

 

I hate it when people cover their little plot with concrete or chippings.. but I hate plastic grass even more.  Even the 'best' stuff is so obviously fake that you might as well resort to concrete.

I suppose it's only a matter of time before folks start buying plastic trees, which don't impose the inconvenience of dropping leaves.....

What is your objection to chippings Col. I assume you mean stone chippings or gravel. There is a small area in front of my house. When I moved here it was covered in crazy paving and looked a mess. I took that up and covered it in natural stone chippings about the size of walnuts, other than the boarders about 3 feet wide which are soil planted with shrubs. It’s large enough to park 2 cars, 3 at a push. The rain soaks through. I did it for cheapness as the house needed a lot of work. 3 of my 4 neighbours have ripped the front gardens up and block paved with drains to the sewerage system which I don’t like and is in my opinion out of character in this rural village setting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had 4 tons of stone chippings on my front garden some 15 years ago, they were a golden brown colour but being south facing and at  the side of my drive they have lost their colour. They now look a dirty black and grey and they have to go, also of the 3 trees planted in them one has been taken out ,the second well on its way out the third a flowering Cherry is staying. Clearing the leaves up is just to much for me even with the garden vacuum, I still have numerous trees left in the back garden which are staying. The problem is what do I do with the front garden, I considered artificial grass but all the chippings need removing and then some of the soil only to have a new base, then sand to replace it finally the grass. I have received a Quote but I thought it was his telephone number but it was the price.

Now I am at a loss of what to do, on different areas of the rear garden I have bark but the birds want to spread it onto the lawn so I dont want that. At the side of this area is a drive for three cars which is block paved and I donot want any more block paving or slabs.

What ever I do I need a machine and skip to get rid of the stones, what do I replace it all with any suggestions please.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in your area Guv' and got some tarmac left over from doin' a job down the road. It's on the back of me truck, so can do it straight away. Me and me mate, :rolleyes:

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, letsavagoo said:

What is your objection to chippings Col. I assume you mean stone chippings or gravel.

 

I don't have an objection as such.  It's more a question of degree, or in some cases, of common sense.

 

In fact, I have an area to one side of my house which is pretty much dead space.  If I had the cash I'd use it as part of a large extension,, but I don't. So for a long time it was just an eyesore used for rough storage.  Then I discovered that 'something' was living in my compost bin.  So, cleared and levelled the area, put down a layer of 20 mm limestone chippings (Two tonnes.. which I had to barrow around the house) levelled them off and placed a tool locker on them. A cheap and simple solution and the chippings are going nowhere because they are contained by walls and fence bases all around.  Just in case this turns out to be a temporary solution I put down a layer of blue 'visqueen' before the chippings, and pierced it with a fork to allow drainage, so the chips could be dug up easily if necessary.  Tool locker isn't really a success so I'm putting a small shed 4'x6' shed in its place.

 

On the other hand.. there are a least two houses round here where the owners have made a 'drive', by just laying tons of flint pebbles. This does not work on a slope and isn't ideal on the flat. You'd struggle to pick anything much worse. Flint slides about and doesn't compact at all.  Result is a constant 'leakage' of flint onto the road, where it can be 'pinged' up by passing traffic and potentially cause damage or injury.

 

Nothing wrong with laying chippings.. or should we call it 'decorative stone' as a way of filling a space, or avoiding having to regularly maintain a lawn.. and as I said above I much prefer that solution to fake grass.  It sounds like you have plants in borders.. which I like.  There are a few round here which are all stone, with a few 'strategically' placed rocks.  Japanese Zen Gardens they definitely are not! I'd prefer to see a few plants, even if in containers. I also have environmental concerns. Every lawn which is 'turned to stone' is another reduction in carbon absorption and also potentially a reduction in water drainage..contributing to flood risk.

 

21 hours ago, Oztalgian said:

We have got artificial grass around our pool, a lot of visitors think it is real and ask how we stop the chlorine in the pool water killing the grass. Yes you do get the odd weed in it especially around the edges I just pull them out. It gets full sun almost all day so we don't get any issues with moss.

It is softer on bare feet than most of the grasses that can survive our hot summers but can be hot on the feet on a 40 degree day.

Some of the plastic plants that you can get these days are very realistic and if the plastic in them has the correct amount of UV stabiliser in it they last for many years even under our harsh sun. You don't have to water them except for a quick hose down to remove any dust now and then, never need pruning and don't drop leaves everywhere. What can be wrong with that?

By the way DJ360 did you have a real Christmas tree?

 

It's your place Oz and I suppose you can do what suits you within what is acceptable locally. Your environment is very different to ours and it may be that minimising water use is the way to go, but I think I really would draw the line at plastic outdoor plants.  Surely you have plants suited to your environment?

 

I've never used 'real' Christmas Trees.  There are arguments both ways.  While they are growong they are environmentally useful.  Disposal after CXhristmas raises a number of carbon related issues.  We have used the same artificial tree for the last 15 years at least.

  • Upvote 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Part of my drive is slate chippings and when new looked really attractive. The problem is I had the kerb lowered to allow the cars on without struggling and created a bit of a nuisance for my self, slate has sharp edges and is excellent at trapping wind blown debris. Leaves (among other stuff), no longer sit patiently in the gutter waiting for the council sweeper, it much prefers moving onto my drive and taking up residence at the foot of a small wall where the chippings make collecting them somewhat difficult. 

I did try a garden vacuum but slate and plastic impellers don't really play nice together.

 

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, DJ360 said:

but I think I really would draw the line at plastic outdoor plants.  Surely you have plants suited to your environment?

I was just pointing out they they are available and look good, we don't have any. We have drought tolerant plants in the borders and a natural lawn at the front and native shrubs and trees in the main garden all with the aim of low maintenance, just have to edge and mow the lawn.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no problems mowing the front part of my lawn as it's almost flat, but round the side it slopes away from the house quite steeply & I have to twist myself to mow it & kills my back. So I'm thinking of having artificial grass on the sloping side part & leaving the front part natural. It'd be easier putting weedkiller/mosskiller on & jetting it now & again. My drive has moss on it & I will jet it when it gets warmer, if I can be bothered that is, lol... 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I 'cut' it with a stiff broom several times a year otherwise NO maintenance required and from a short distance it still looks good but a close look does show up several small patches of moss which is why I asked for suggestions for removal or prevention?  i.e. do the chemical 'Moss killers' etc. stain the 'grass' ?                                                                                            P8260221.jpg                                                                                                                                                                  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

A lot of chemical moss killers contain iron and I know they can stain pavers with a rust colour, don't know if they stain artificial grass. Do you have any small pieces left over to use as a test piece?

Albert, I think your garden looks great

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...