Wages when you first went to work


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If you worked a five day week Monday to Friday, a fortnights holiday would involve three Saturdays...   :Fool:

 

I knew what you meant Mary....

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When I worked at Bestwood colliery, my older brother, who worked in 'High Main', the seam above, he was called in the personnel office and was asked why he only worked four days a week? His answer...

I was thrilled to get my first wages in one of thoes brown envelips. As I was an Apprentice Hairdresser it did not amout to much.   £1 7/6   for a week for a lot of hard work.   10

When I started nursing I had to work 5 and a half days each week!  I seem to think that was 44 hours.  (but was often more than this for various  reasons) On nights, I remember I worked 9 days on

When I started nursing I had to work 5 and a half days each week!  I seem to think that was 44 hours.  (but was often more than this for various  reasons)

On nights, I remember I worked 9 days on and 5 off which worked out as a minimum of 45 hours/week.

i can’t remember how much I earned but I know it wasn’t much!  
I loved it though - not everyone can say that about their work

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When I were on the buses, I only ever had one Saturday off in 4 years and even that was a change of duty with another driver, so I could get married. Always worked Christmas day too, but that was by choice.

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As Margie says,,not everyone enjoyed their work,,and many of us spend the biggest part of our lives doing it,,

Can honestly say i loved my working life,,which spanned nearly 60 years,,and consider myself a lucky man,,

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I’ve always enjoyed my work. Everyday something different, everyday a new challenge. Obviously I was fortunate in never having a repetitive routine. I’ve just come in from working today, both in the workshop and out in the field with a brushcutter and chain saw, attacking brambles and over growing branches in the hedges. After a cup of tea and a bun to I’m going over to the greenhouses to prepare for the new season. I love to go to bed feeling really tired.

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it was 2 Saturdays a year with your yearly holidays. 

 

Sorry if I had it wrong.

 

When we first started work in late 50 early 60s you were only allowed 2 weeks holiday a year, and that was after you had worked for the same employer for at least a year

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9 hours ago, Brew said:

If you worked a five day week Monday to Friday, a fortnights holiday would involve three Saturdays...   :Fool:

 

I knew what you meant Mary....

The  reason we were only allowed 2 Saturdays was because Saturday with beilny in the salon it was a normal working day. Saturdays was allways busy. and once you had your own collum of clients  you had to keep them happy.

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You'r right they pay your wage's

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10 hours ago, Beekay said:

You've allus got to keep yer clients 'appy Mary.  :rolleyes:

You'r not taking the P????????  Beekay are you?   :flyswat:

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I worked at harry wheatcroft  the rose grower in edwalton in 1959. for a  56 hour week I got £2. 1. 6p  and boy did you  have to work hard,, it was slave labour,, I  stuck it for about  2 months  and bugered off  ,, I went to wood bastow in clifton   as  a storeman  and got £6 10s for 38 hrs a week

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Even worse now to get your fortnight off@mary1947 my daughters a stylist, her working week includes Saturday & Sunday with 2 days off mid week. 

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Swings and Roundabouts I think.

Most jobs up to late 60s/ early 70s were a minimum of 40 hours p.w. Saturday morning was a common requirement, and of course Saturday working went with the territory in retail/hairdressing etc.

New year's day wasn't a holiday until sometime in the 70's.  I worked with a Scottish bloke who flatly refused to work New Year's Day. They didn't sack him.

 

Then again. 'time and a half' was common recompense for working overtime above basic contracted hours.  Also 'Double Time' for Sundays and 'Treble Time' for working Bank Holidays.

 

He Majesty The Blessed Margaret of Thatcher did away with all that.

 

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Yes your right DJ360 When i first stated work it was 44 hour working week  you had to rely on customer's giving you a tip's to help your wages.  The hardest thing was if a friend or family mamber ask you to do there hair, they would offer payment and it was hard to accept payment off a friend or any one else that you knew. We were our own wost enemy. Thankfully when i talk to my hairdresser now about wages they do seem to be on reasonable money. One boss i worked for, used to say ,Quality is rememberd were quantity is forgotton Maybe he was right he did have 8 salons and a villa in Spain. 

New Year's day  I think that after a good night out people did not turn up for work, or worse from drink,  so they did not have much choice but to give the workers the day off.  My brother in law was taken into the office once and ask why he never worked on a Monday,  "well he said if you look at my record On a Monday I have never been late. so I thinks thats good." So if I get up late I will have the day off.  

UP THE WORKERS!!!

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When I worked at Bestwood colliery, my older brother, who worked in 'High Main', the seam above, he was called in the personnel office and was asked why he only worked four days a week? His answer...

"Well I can't manage on three". That's true, honest. He got two days suspension without pay!

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