Ayagorawiya?

Listergate 1950-60's

Recommended Posts

I remember Woollies being a Y shape with a great cafeteria upstairs where we used to go every saturday in the 50,s. It encompassed the Sawyers Arms which had a right reputation as the Yanks based at Ruddington used the pub and the local lasses went there to get their silk stockings and anything else they could get their hands on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i remember going upstairs in woolies to their self service restaurant, quite a big place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re yanks at Sawyers Arms and The Tower, yes that was true during the war and years after but not sure they were based at Ruddington? I know they were at Langer as I have several letters from a GI written to my aunt around 1943/44, one containing great line "am I right thinking nine and a half inch is your nylons size" (naughty but nice as they'd be sheer fully fashioned!) Not sure what happened to "Sgt Jerry" (had his full name service number etc but USA even 50 years after end of war refuse to give details) a later envelope bore red stamping "USA Red Cross" etc with contents stating he was in hospital but not where or what problem was. Outside woolworths was the Walter (Water?) memorial, I think erected by some businessman as tribute to his son who was killed in WW1? (not sure of last facts) Do know though that a trolley bus pole came off wire and hit it, the lump of stone it knocked off hit a passer by and killed him!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also told me the more adventurous yank frequented The Alma & The Spread Eagle on Alfreton Road , because this was where the more promiscuous of the Nottm ladies hung out .

Damn! I didn't know that, I wondered why my missus never made much in The Flying Horse! Only joking, she actually worked there but was asked "how much?" once, told him 10/- same as his sister charged, in mid 1960's The Alma was a Lesbo Pub I recall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just found this thread.

The ground at the bottom of Stanford Street, prior to the construction of the Woolies extension, was used as a burial ground for a chapel situated just north on Castle Gate.

I clearly remember watching the excavations on one of our Saturday morning trips into town, and I reckon it must have been in the mid 50's. My father had purchased a rather large bag of pork scratchings from the Pork Farms shop on Parliament Street and we stood next to the site scoffing these while the excavators unceremoniously shovelled up folks's mortal remains and dumped them into lorries. I know that there were and are rules refering to the removal of human remains, but it depends on their age and living relatives. When I worked years later for the Diocesian Architects, I learnt the rules, which even then were somewhat 'manipulated'.

I still think of that day when I have a decent bag of scratchings now, it was also a combination of smells, pork, fresh soil and that fusty smell you get from old bones.

As I recall the new Woolies was built on the steel frame principle with massive great concrete foundations, it didn't seem to take long to build. The record department was situated at the end of the vee, probably right on top of some ardent Baptists, I doubt whether they got them all out.

Wollaton Park was developed as a transit camp for US troops prior to the invasion at D-Day.

Later it was used to house Italian prisoners of war, with British guards, the Yanks were advancing through Europe with Patton, too valuable to waste, besides the Italians were pretty benign and were allowed to work locally.

During the time of the American build up, my father as a member of the Royal Artillery was removed from Norfolk to Larkhill, given a promotion to senior sergeant and was a lecturer on all sorts of technical gun ranging mathematics, as well as radios.

Meanwhile my mother was constantly harrased by US troops on her trips up Trowell Road to the Co-op in Wollaton village, what saved her was my brother, a lovely bouncing baby in his pram that the Yanks doted on, to be fair, she said that they were lovely blokes, I'm dying to ring her but she's got her mate Sheila round for tea, not allowed.

Sorry, having a moment here, Radio 2 are playing Halleluhah by Jeff Buckley, if you've never heard it, get a life, yes, I know it was written by Leonard Cohen, but it gets me every time I hear Buckleys version, I don't know why, but it makes me think of my late dad.

Anyway, the said great late dad came home on leave to find Wollaton overrun by American troops, not that he had a problem with them, he loved the blokes, some of his later combat experiences with them were legendary, British RA sergeant and his pals the US 82nd Airborne, fuelled by several bottles of Johnny Walker attacking Waffen SS in Holland, don't take me there, it would make a great film.

Anyway, the old boy went to the Admiral Rodney to find it full of US troops, no problem with that, except that he asked for a glass of whisky and was told they didn't have any, no problem, warm watered down bitter will do. Trouble is, when the GI's wanted whisky, they got it, consequence, massive row with landlord, 'I was strafed by German aircraft in 1940, don't take the p###'. He was very reluctant to go in there for years afterwards, even when it was my stag night in 1977, you could tell, he felt uncomfortable.

I'll get more info off my mum when I ring her tomorrow, daren't upset her day, she's 92 and an absolute gem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone asked where the empties were chucked out in the Sawyers, since Woolies built around them... I asked my Mum about it.

Apparently there was another pub on the other side of Woolies, and they and the Sawyers shared a walkway/alleyway that came out on the other side. At first the empties used to be taken out of the front, but it was decided that even if that was done after hours it looked untidy so they came to an agreement with the other pub and rolled them down the alleyway, and eventually stock was delivered up that way too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked at a shop top left in the picture around 1963/4, I think its "Samuels" now but back then it was "Paragon Jewelers" second job after leaving school didn't stay there long retail wasn't for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was on the Nottingham Facebook page recently and got a massive number of comments. Let's see what happens here. 

 

listergate%20copy_zpsfwv9xgll.jpg

  • Upvote 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gosh! That brings back some memories, CT. The old C&A stores, Woolworths...remember all those shops. We used to go down by the side of the shop on the right to catch the bus to Clifton to see friends, before the Broad Marsh Centre was built.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to hate it down there on a Saturday afternoon. Millions of people and me squashed among them between shops and those railings on the edge of the pavement while buses and trollies were zooming up and down the road.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Know what you mean P/man, it was always a vibrant part of town and had to go with the flow to get to the bus station for the 14 Barton to Ruddington. Used to occasionally frequent The Sawyers after it had been "gentrified" into a Berni. Home Ales never bothered doing that with The Tower!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the "car park" sign points you to the patch of waste ground at the side of Broad Marsh bus station,seem to remember it was two bob or two and six to park for the day, and the Derby sign sends you along Castle blvd.

I was dragged up that road on many a Saturday,in C & A,then British Home stores,then Woollies,then Marks and Spencer,never remember me mam buying owt though,then dragged all the way back down Arkwright street to check out all the shops there before arriving back on Bathley street.

 

Rog

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

# 36, Cliff Ton, this picture got posted on the MODS Facebook site, closed group for ex- Dungeon Club regulars. Brought much comment......mine was regarding the proximity to Stanford Street (home of The Club) & Sawyers Arms which separated two the 2 halves of Woollies, had my first drink in Sawyers.....

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A great picture, lots going on and very evocative, most of us must have been up and down there of a Saturday, grudgingly as a kid and more enthusiastically as a teen with money to spend. I worked at the Woolies for a while and used the Sawyers quite a bit. Interesting the railings along the street, I'd forgotten about them, can't remember when they were removed.

 

There's what appears to be a military ambulance, can't make out what's to the left of it, looks like a large sign across the pavement? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#39..............aaaaaaaaaaaahh The Towers, such fond memories of possibly the roughest pub in town, only one PC would attend trouble there Tug Wilson !!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been mentioned somewhere in another thread, but the place was actually named "The Tower" although many people seem to refer to it in the plural.

 

tower.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fountain you mentioned was called The Walter Fountain, before it was knocked down there was a social club on the site, can't remember the name of it though, then after it was pulled down it was a car park.  when you came out of C an A's  back entrance there was a café and a pub called The Towers this also lead on to Broad Marsh bus station. The Eight Bells pub was closed down by the police. Looking at the photo I wonder which  number bus it is 43/40/47/ when the buses arrived at the island 43 went left down Arkright St to Trent Bridge and the 40/47 went right down to the bottom of Wilford Road.

Broad Marsh was original slum housing, my mother-in-law used to live down their and often they would move houses in the night as they could not afford the rent, hence the saying moonlight flit. Also the 10 0 o clock horses  use to come round collecting. For young one's these carts and horses use to collect the poo bins.

ps I seem to think that their use to be a statue of Queen Victoria can any member confirm this?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the photo Cliff it just confirms what I've written.

If you look at the trolleys bus photos that radfordred  member has put on the site you will see picture 52 with the car park. (photos of Nottm)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Correct Mary,there was a statue of Queen Victoria, at the end of the market square/Long row,it is now in the memorial gardens (rock gardens) down the Trent embankment

 

Rog

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/01/2017 at 7:40 PM, mary1947 said:

The fountain you mentioned was called The Walter Fountain, before it was knocked down there was a social club on the site, can't remember the name of it though, then after it was pulled down it was a car park. 

 

That's something I'd never come across before, but I've found a photo of the social club. At least in the 1950s it was called 'The Railwaymen's Club", and was obviously a corrugated tin shed. If you can't place the location, the Astoria - now Ocean - is on the right.

greyfriar_zpszoanawwm.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just seem to remember one more thing before the car park was made and the social club had been demolished was there some toilets? a bit like the one's that used to be in the market square, going under ground.

Thanks Cliff Ton I remember going to the club one Christmas with my brother, can't remember how old we were but we went to see Santa Clause at the Children's Christmas party.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just that simple one comment -  10 O'clock horses takes me back 50 years. My mother used to say it to me, Dont let the 10 O'Clock horses catch you. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...