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Do recently built houses even have a dedicated dining room ? The fashion tends to be for open-plan kitchens and living rooms etc.

 

You'd have to live in an older house - or a very large one - to have a separate dining room.  Our council house in Clifton - built in the early 50s - had a separate dining room and living room, and we always ate in the dining room.

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Reckon I look quite dapper in me tuxedo and black tie, when I'm having me egg and chips.

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We certainly used to when I lived with my parents. When we married we used the dining room in our first home but since we moved to our present house about 30 years ago we tended to eat in the separate dining area of the kitchen. We do have a large, elegant dining room which we only use at Christmas (known as The State Dining Room!) and we haven’t entertained friends for dinner for some years. I gave my dinner jacket away so I no longer dress for dinner. :biggrin:

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Too right Monseiur ! If you're strapped for dinner guests, I'm sure I could find me way to near Newark/Southwell. I'll bring me own spoon (not allowed sharp utensils).

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Had to ask the other half how long ago we ate in the dining room. She reckons 7 christmases ago when we invited the family round for a boxing day get together.

We found out that having 16 people in the dining room just doesn't work!

I seem to remember that at least half the visitors joined me in the lounge to eat around the big table in there. Slightly chaotic boxing day after we had drinks. Never again.

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Thank you kind sir, my utmost respects to you too.

Better be careful before being accused of favouritism and especially when it's not Nottm.

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We are always dressed for dinner. Our neighbours can see through the French windows and report us if we don't...   ;)

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Before my son and his family took over the rest of the house and we were left with the ground floor, one Christmas we had 36 at the dining tables ( 2 extending ones ) we were the only ones that could hold the close family. We dont have a dining room now, that became our lounge and as we have a large kitchen we eat there. 

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When married 1965 we lived in  a terrace house, scullery, middle room and front room. We brought a dinning room set which had a long sideboard table and 4 chairs cost about £50 had to have it on tick but I loved it. When we moved our dinning room set went with us, it was long lounge with open plan but it fitted in, then over to South Africa our D/set went over there. Retuning home sold it for £25 00. Since then have had 2 dinning room sets. last one was from Jessops now John Lewis brought in their sale from £900 to £750 it is now over 25years old and still looks as good as the day I got it. The only thing is we are now in a small bungalow which is 2 bed rooms No just wait a minute One for sleeping and the other a dinning room. I just love sitting at a table but never dress up for dinner. ps only when on thoes thing you call holidays and stay in hotels.

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I have a large antique oak top table with 6 chairs for our dining room and it gets used quite often for Sunday lunch when the family visit. Other times eating is a tray on the knee. I often use the table for working on the laptop etc. 

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10 hours ago, mary1947 said:

When married 1965 we lived in  a terrace house, scullery, middle room and front room. 

 

Scullery isn't a word you hear these days. My grandma in Radford always used it.

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What I never understood, in our Denton Street hovel, we had a little pantry thing that had shallow sandstone sink. But there wasn't a tap ! anywhere. :Shock:

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Ours is a through lounge/diner 21 feet by 11 feet 6 inches with a table at one end near patio doors, & reclining sofa & a reclining chair, telly, wood effect electric fire (spinner flame effect gubbins no longer spins though) & a stereo system Some neighbours have put a wall up half way through their lounge to make 2 rooms but they're a bit small IMO...   

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I'm not a fan of dining kitchens. It smacks of below the salt dining. I have a separate dining room but rarely use it. However, I would not want to incorporate it into another area.

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The house we are currently renting doesn't have a dining room but the kitchen is large enough for dining tables and chairs. We eat at the dining table unless we feel like watching TV and relaxing whilst we eat. We are looking to buy this year/next and I'm not fussed either way if it has a specific dining room. 

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I've just looked up the word scullery. I always thought it was an alternative to 'kitchen', but apparently not.

 

In bigger houses, the scullery was the place where pots and pans and plates were washed. It was a separate side-room off the main kitchen.

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At. The house in Nottingham where I grew up we had a lounge, a dining room (but it was mostly used as my playroom) a kitchen, where we ate most of the time except for bigger family gatherings, a pantry and a scullery.

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I was born and lived my early life in a very modest 2 up 2 down terraced house in Radford. The kitchen which was the single storey bit at the back, common in these type of houses, had a small separate room off the kitchen which was always referred to as the scullery. I can remember a meat safe being in there which was a small cupboard with big panels of perforated zinc in it. I don’t remember what else as when I was about 3 or 4 the bath was moved from upstairs into the scullery so what had been the upstairs bathroom became my bedroom. My goodness, it was cold in winter. 

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Our house had 3 bedrooms and the two largest had fireplaces. What was referred to as the box bedroom was still large enough to accommodate a double bed and other furniture but it had no fireplace. In that room was a metal grille set high up into the wall which was, presumably, for ventilation purposes. In cold weather, that room was freezing! I could never understand that as the room was on the corner of the house and was, in any event, the coldest of the 3 bedrooms.   In later years, the grille was bricked up and the room had a central heating radiator as did all the others. When I was a child, it wasn't at all uncommon in winter to find a glass of water you'd taken up to bed had ice on the top in the morning, nor to find the windows too frosted to see through!

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