Sunday dinner


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Just finished sorting this evenings dinner. Two Vegan, one vegetarian and two omnivores(guess which I am?) and all meals taken on the hoof at different times.

I started thinking about Sunday dinners on Bagnall road. It was always roast, and  division of labour was set in stone. Mum and one sister cooked. Youngest sister set the table, I made the mint sauce and mashed the taters. Dad carved the roast and was in charge of the Shippos' Nut Brown (remember that?)

What were your Sundays like?

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When I were growing up Mother always cooked Sunday dinner but me dad would make the Yorkshire pudding, after the meat was took out of the roasting pan he would pour the mixture in the pan and put it in the oven,perfect every time,big pan sized Yorkshire pudding cut into four, lovely,I cook Sunday dinners in our house and all the other days really because I enjoy cooking, Mrs P enjoys eating them, when I was at work she made sure my dinner was on the table every night I got home,now I've retired I can pay her back by cooking for her,bless her

 

Rog

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My dad always made the Yorkshire puddings and oversaw Sunday lunch. Mum would have admitted that she never really learned to cook and dad was much more able in that department.

 

I don't like cooking. Not really into food. I eat in order to live whereas some I know live in order to eat!

 

Don't eat very much. Always had a small appetite.

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it was always a roast on a Sunday at home with Mum doing it all, I wasn’t even allowed to make the gravy, which didn’t really stand me in good stead when I left home and got married, it was very much trial and error for me but we survived.   My Dad was brilliant, he prepared the vegetables 7 days a week and always washed up, with me drying and putting away.  My brother, 5 years younger than me, got away with doing nothing to help, he was always spoilt!  Dad always carved the meat, Mum never attempted that.

Since we got married 95% of the time we’ll have a roast dinner on a Sunday, I love doing it, but hate cooking generally.  I have never attempted carving either.  My husband usually does the cooking during the week and that suits me.  A friend of mine who used to come and visit regularly at weekends when we lived in Herts has always complimented me on my Sunday dinners, roast potatoes and Yorkshire puds.  Quite a compliment actually as she is a fantastic cook.   

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My Lady had only ever eaten chicken when we married so that was more or less the only thing she could/would cook. Now it has all changed as I sit here the aroma of roast pork drifts upstairs and I know it will be just great.

 

Mom made the Yorkshires so when I married unknown to me the lady took lessons from my mom, result perfect Yorkshires every time.

 

Apart from fitting a new kitchen a couple of years back, I am banned from 'her' kitchen unless of course a repair needs doing, then I am allowed under supervision.

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While I was at home, I had a roast virtually every Sunday. Mum was a fantastic cook and baker, and dad did the carving thereby ensuring that he always had the best of any crackling, and the bloody end of the first cut of the roast joint.

Things deteriorated rapidly once mum got a pressure cooker. From then on, simply everything tasted the same. It was horrific, and I frequently prayed for a malfunction and that the stuff would explode all over the kitchen.

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Just about to sit down to our Sunday dinner: Slow roast brisket of beef, mash and roasties, leeks, parsnips, sprouts and carrots with onion gravy and Yorkshire puds.  All veg and spuds home-grown and picked a few minutes ago; so very, very fresh :) .

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^^Similar here, the first of the spring cabbage (yes I know it's early but they at large enough for two portions), baby leaks, my frozen peas and Picasso roasties, and the lady's best gravy all with that pork and crackling to die for.

 

I could love my lady just for her cooking................................

 

Must go for now it's to be served in the next 10 minutes.....

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^^^Everything except the pork you are right, thank goodness for containers.

 

And by the way it was just delicious, pork to melt in your mouth and lovely crisp crackling. Already looking forward to tomorrows potato cakes and left overs, to me it's all part of Sunday lunch.

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  • 3 years later...

I went to Tool Station in Newark this lunchtime to pick up a few things. I was staggered to see the enormous queues of cars and people waiting to get into McDonalds and KFC just over the road. Don’t people sit down on Sundays for proper meals anymore? We eat in the evenings and tonight it will be roast beef and apple pie with fruit from the orchard. My wife is attempting to get the Bramleys from the top branches as our daughter has been and picked off all the low hanging ones!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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45 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

. My wife is attempting to get the Bramleys from the top branches as our daughter has been and picked off all the low hanging ones!

 

A walking stick comes in useful for gently pulling  down the higher branches..: also good for reaching the very high brambles with the huge juicy blackberries which are out of normal reach.  This is a very  good year for blackberries round here.  We have lots of country paths and lanes…. The blackberries in some areas are huge - not like the small seedy ones on the roadsides!  I made 3 crumbles yesterday and froze 3 containers of fruit as well.  Paul collected all of those in about an hour and a half.

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9 hours ago, MargieH said:

I made 3 crumbles yesterday

Blackberry and Apple crumble with lashings of piping hot custard......Yummo

You have to be careful picking blackberries here especially on the road side as they are a declared noxious weed and have been most likely sprayed. Never seen a Bramley apple in OZ, we have to make do with Granny Smith as cookers.

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7 hours ago, Oztalgian said:

Never seen a Bramley apple in OZ, we have to make do with Granny Smith as cookers.

Crumbles being made most days here at the moment. Remains of the ancient hedegrow next to our front drive (still owned as a ransom strip by the estate developer)

has a mass of blacberries. Apples courtesy of our neighbour. He planted trees when each of his children were born. All Cox's Orange Pippin, but one tree produces them at the same size as a Bramley! Probably not as good to cook with, but, with custard (and ice cream), I can't tell the difference.

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Oz, we never pick blackberries from the roadside hedges.  We only gather them from the little country  paths where motor vehicles can’t go.  The really good berries are obviously from cultivated plants which have somehow found their way  from their original sites.  There are several dog walkers use the same paths  so obviously we don’t gather from the lower branches!!

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I saw on a TV program once that the original Bramley tree of which others have been propergated/cloned (not sure which), although still alive, is slowly dying. When it's dead, that will be it for the original Bramley. Is that true Phil?

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That’s the story. It’s at Bramley Tree Cottage on Easthorpe in Southwell. The cottage was bought by Nottingham Trent for student accommodation at the Brackenhurst campus and they’re  keeping an eye on it as I believe it has fungal disease. If you want a taste of the original then I can supply. You could even clone from the clones! We had one in a delicious crumble yesterday. They’re not cropping as prolifically as last year but they do tend to produce in two yearly cycles. I must get them pruned this year.

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We have a Bramley in our close, between two apartment blocks. We get some superb apples from it. I picked some a couple of weeks ago, knowing they were undersized, but when I peeled and microwaved them they were delicious,  no sweetener added. Picked three last week and had them in a Crumble and like you said, very tasty,( had mine with ice cream). They make lovely apple sauce to go with pork too. I usually freeze any extra and it lasts ages, with no loss of taste.Thanks Bramley.

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Can't beat "A Bramley Apple"  Eat um or cook um the Best Apple Ever.

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15 hours ago, philmayfield said:

we bought them from Merryweather's in Southwell.

Is Merryweathers still on Fiskerton Rd at the top of the hill where you drop down into Southwell? Bought a fair few roses from their many years ago.

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On 11/12/2017 at 2:11 PM, oldphil said:

Two Vegan, one vegetarian and two omnivores

 

Sod that for a game of soldiers, if you do like it, don’t eat it, fussy boggers.

 

I have a relative that reckons he don't like cheese, but eats pizza, the loon :crazy:

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  • Cliff Ton changed the title to Sunday dinner

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