Nottingham accents


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I tell you what really annoys me when you go out for a meal and the waitress/waiter (serving person I guess, to be pc) says”Are you ready to order GUYS?”  I really feel like saying “have you not noticed I’m female? Aghhhh

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EY-UP Duck yo or rate ? EY-UP Brian...ye am ok Duck........   Normal Duck ? No Ta Duck....just a black coffee.......   How much is this Cat Duck ?   £3 Duck...

50yrs in West Midlands and I hope I am still a "Miduck" I had to drop a few of our expressions eg "Pods for babies bootees and duddoos and suckers and bobbar etc" but I love our accent, though I know

Like it or not we have to accept that our language is continually evolving. We don’t all have to go along with the flow though. Some of us like to maintain the standards of ‘received pronunciation’. D

I've noticed that as well but I think it may be one of those cases where language evolves over time - Guys has now become a word to address any group of people, regardless of whether they are male or female.

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42 minutes ago, MRS B said:

“have you not noticed I’m female?

 

In this day and age it's best not to assume!    :P

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Brew annoying though, I never assume, it’s always dangerous. I’m an evaluator of all situations and possible outcomes. Maybe comes from being in a planning environment for an airline for 30+ years where anything is possible.

 

Mrs B

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9 hours ago, Jill Sparrow said:

Duck is still very common in Derbyshire, as is nesh, tabs and a host of other sayings ascribed to Nottinghamshire. One that isn't, is smockravelled, meaning confused or bewildered. I confess, I do like that one and use it frequently.

 

Reminds me of 'Cross-Chockled', which as far as I can determine..has similar meaning, but derives from St Helens.

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5 hours ago, MRS B said:

I tell you what really annoys me when you go out for a meal and the waitress/waiter (serving person I guess, to be pc) says”Are you ready to order GUYS?”  I really feel like saying “have you not noticed I’m female? Aghhhh

 

It's just an example of developing 'usage'. 'Guys' is now used as a term of address to a mixed group. I'm not taking sides on this, but I do think that mostly it is used as a more familiar and friendly term, as opposed to lazy or disrespectful.

 

Personally, I'd use 'Ladies and Gentlemen', because it would sit better with my own age, and I'd use a mildly ironic inflection, gently mocking both myself and the 'punters'.

 

But then I've always had a weird sense of humour.

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I gave some talks to several local history societies in recent years and it was suggested that I avoid using the term ‘ladies and gentlemen’ as gender assumption is a can of worms. As my audience were general older people I didn’t perceive a problem but it was given when at a ‘council’ venue and I complied. The term ‘duck’ was very common in the Radford of my youth but with the young now it seems absent. Referring to friends as ‘fam’ is common where my grandson lives in Eastwood and elsewhere I suspect. An older woman in Birds at Eastwood always serves by asking ‘now then my duck’ never ‘me duck’. 

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Never heard of 'fam',  utterly another irritating phrase is the Mid-atlantic term 'Bro'.

Why do people not speak English anymore? There's an announcer on BBC2 who never uses 'th' , he refers to programs coming on in firty minutes, or fought and fink.

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Like it or not we have to accept that our language is continually evolving. We don’t all have to go along with the flow though. Some of us like to maintain the standards of ‘received pronunciation’. Dost thou not agree?

 

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Nah, maybe the posh version where yo is, its Ey. But proper folk say Ayup like wot I do...     :P

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  • Cliff Ton changed the title to Nottingham accents

Don't know, I'll ask her next time she nips round to borrow a cup of sugar..

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She would to pronounce her aitch, as in Hay-up, what do you do?

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My father was an absolute stickler for spoken English and used to criticise news readers on telly all the time. Apart from Angela Rippon and Moira Stuart who both had beautiful speaking voices and were his favourites. Being a McDonald his favourite gripe was calling folks north of the border Scotch not Scots. 
That doesn’t stop me though using Notts lingo being born and bred in the county.

 

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4 hours ago, Brew said:

But proper folk say Ayup like wot I do...  

Ayup Brew, You can be in my gang Miduck. Cos I'm posh Annawl. thumbsup

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5 hours ago, philmayfield said:

How does the Queen say it then?

If you wish to sound like Liz then substitute a sounds with e sounds.

It ectually works!!

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Sounds like it would be e reel  pein in the erse...

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Nottingham words    We tend to ask for a sucker when we should say ice lolli, and yet when we lived over in South Africa they also called them Sucker's.

What they did not like though, went into a green grocer's and ask for half a pound of nobby greens, of cause they did not know what they were.

If you do over to Germany never ever ask for "Mushy Peas" it is a very rude word, little story  Went over to my brother's who ives in Germany for the "IRISH FOLK FESTIVAL"  which is in Aug and what was for you to eat!!!  yes Fish n'Chips with Mushy Peas!!!  

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When I worked at QMC we were told to never call anyone "duck" as in "would you like a cup of tea me duck?" Can't remember anyone taking any notice though & no one ever complained to gaffers AFAIK..... When on an underground visit to the National Mining Museum near Wakefield my wife called me duck & the guide took the micky out of us. Mind you he took the mickey out of me big time when he learn't I was on the underground loco's down Hucknall pit: he kept shining his light at me & asking if I was still awake? The cheeky so-&-so... 

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