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After all the hot dry weather we’ve had it’s started to rain. Guess what - the contractor is cutting our hay! At least I don’t get involved these days and it doesn’t cost me anything.:biggrin:

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Phil, does someone come over to pitchfork it into a hay wagon as in the old days, or is it in baled.  Sounds lovely - I can almost smell it from here…

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Margie, he's probably got a Haywain on it's way as we speak, complete with a couple of pitchforks and a flagon of cider.

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I do have the traditional pitchfork but it’s all done mechanically now with a big round baler. It really is idyllic here, walking through the new mown hay on a summer’s evening. No holidays abroad for me, I’ve got everything I could wish for on my own doorstep. A pub within walking distance, an excellent farm shop four miles away, Southwell five miles, Newark with a Waitrose ten miles. I bought a new shirt for £9 at the farmers’ shop in Newark this afternoon and I picked up a few bottles of the finest ales from the Milestone Brewery in Cromwell. Tonight fish and chips! Is heaven like this?

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1 minute ago, Beekay said:

Margie, he's probably got a Haywain on it's way as we speak, complete with a couple of pitchforks and a flagon of cider.

It used to be like that ‘when I were a lad’ but we have to move with the times and I’m too old for humping hay bales, stacking them in sevens and then carting them to the shed in the tractor loader bucket. I just watch others doing it now

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You really ought post some pictures of this idyllic scene, so we can share your enjoyment. Without giving any details of course

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Just imagine a field of golden, newly cut hay, the field surrounded with trees, the wooded Trent hills in the distance. I’ve just sent pictures to our son and daughter on WhatsApp but I’ve never beeen successful in posting pictures on this site.

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I'm on WhatsApp, do you want me number? (Could pick up some ideas for paint projects).

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Not quite the Trent or hayfields,but just finished me planter.

20220722-181901.jpg

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Thank you Ian. It's only a little planter that I've been working on this week. Monday and Tuesday was like painting with treacle, but I persevered.

It's always nice to get encouragement,  and thanks to you too PP. 

Had to soak the planter first as it had a paper design on it. Scraped it off and started again. (Wonder how much the postage would be to Canada?).

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Not quite haymaking in this sense but near us we have quite a lot of fields and the grass is always being cut , dried and round baled. As more fields have done growing corn they are replaced with vines so really we dont get to see many bales ....only grapes:biggrin:

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Barrie when it gets a bit cooler ill have a walk and take some pics for you. There are some beautiful views near us.

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I don't think anyone around here is haymaking yet, it's way too dry and too risky taking tractor and implements into the fields, the place is a tinder box just waiting for someone to hit some flintstone.

Normally, first hay is cut and bailed in late May, but was pretty poor this year, so most hung on a couple of months, now it's a fire hazard.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Lovely stuff BK, just love seeing the things people do with their time and keeping the little grey cells active, much better than sitting in front of a tv or newspaper, life is far too short for that

 

Rog

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The hay is cut after the dew has "burnt off" then it is tedded with a tedder, ie tedder is a large rotating  fork that piles the cut grass into rows ready for the baler and usually done the second day, at least that's what my neighbours do. The large bails are then collected and stored either in a barn or outside with a tarp covering them ready for winter feed by cattle.

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It’s been turned and rowed up now so I guess it will be baled tomorrow. No chance of any rain here for days. Looks like a fair crop. In the past, with the smaller bales, we’ve had around 200 but I don’t know how that equates to the large round bales. At least I won’t be stacking them in this heat.

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