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GUILTY AS CHARGED! I was on from 81 through to 88, and i was one of the TURKEYS that iron cross and friends tried to get. but i was young and stupid then. now i'm just old and dumb! i was always mobil

Right to get this thread back going again.. there is another recording of old 'boxer' on http://ukcb.tripod.com there was two more of tony rifleman, but recorded quality was low, so being re-done. i

Around 1983, some mates and I recorded "our version" of "The Curse of the Claw" (Ripping Yarns) onto an audio cassette tape then I hooked it up to my Dad's CB rig in Bulwell with his recently acquired

  • 10 months later...
On 1/13/2007 at 9:57 PM, mick2me said:

I think the Rotel 240 was the same build too.

Ham international, you mean USB/LSB Ver naughty too Good Bud!

Who Can I remember?

The 'Gas Man' "Help me push this Cement Mixer up Carlton Hill"

Gemini Lady Karen

Bendigo Lady (Fran) aka bendy old lady Sneinton

Country Gentleman or Cee Gee, (Ron) Colwick

Murdock (Nick) Carlton)

Ian 'Beefsteak' Carlton

Oh yes and 'The glorious ALPHA Organisation'

"All pledge allegience to 'The glorious ALPHA Organisation'"

The Iron Cross (phil) was a mate in those Days, we were well known 'turkey' trackers, after dark.

And me 'Professional' (as apposed to Amature)

Amazing what pops up on the internet, CB days! Gemini Lady, often think what happened to Karen, was an ex of mine. There a few other names I remember in that list. My handle was Manta.

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Is anyone still using CB? I never got involved. 'Breaker one nine for a copy...' 'What's your twenty?'

 

Sometimes when I go up to the top of our local hill.. there will be a chap using 'Amateur Radio' and talking to people on other continents.  It's all very polite and correct, with proper call signs etc.

 

I can talk to people all over the World on my phone., but I can still see the attraction of older technologies.

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DJ, up in Boolwool,  they never asked, " what's your twenty"? It always came out as "Twenny ".

We had a club that met in the Nelson at  Crabtree. Met on Wednesday nights, hence "Wednesday Squadron".

I've still got two rigs, one being a Midland Ready Recue, still in it's case.

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I reckon the novelty started to wear off in the late eighties Phil. Then when mobiles came along, it killed CB stone dead. A pity really, I used to like using the link to other travellers. Once the estate kids got their hands on radios it all went downhill as they were not using correct radio procedure and just bucket mouthing all the time, blocking out bona fide users. I fitted a decent little radio to my son's mobility scooter, so was able to monitor him if he went visiting or along the seafront without us tagging along. For example, if we went to Wollaton Park, he could be half way round the lake and we could be enjoying a cuppa in the café. 

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55 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

What caused CB radio to die out? I never got involved but it always intrigued me.

 

Mobile phones.

 

CB was stone-age technology compared to what came later.

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The CB radio craze hit its peak 1979/80 while still illegal, It died off when legalised & operated from a different band & new radios, can't see mobile phones having any effect, ownership was still less than 50% even in 2001/2 twenty years later.

 

    

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I bought a couple of hand held radios when I was at Chailey Heritage school. It help 'er indoors to locate me as I could be anywhere on sight. This was of course, before I'd even got a mobile phone. The radios came in handy when travelling in tandem with another car. Able to communicate without having to stop and converse. I used to have a pager but the radios worked better, (if my pager went off, I would have to find a phone). Still got a couple of pairs of radios.

Used to have radios at Holme Pierrepont, when I was a Ranger. (HP5)

Another point, CBs are free to use.

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The mobile network in the UK started around '85. My brother was an early adopter toting something that looked like a yellow suitcase around.

I don't think they killed CB, the government did that by cleverly making them legal - but on FM with a different frequency, low power outputs and requiring a licence..

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My first ‘mobile’ was a unit that clipped into a cradle in my car. It was about the size of a car radio. It could be slid out and put into a leather case whereby you’d could carry it over your shoulder. It was referred to as ‘the talking handbag’! A friend in the motor trade had one the size and weight of a house brick. He would take it to car auctions. It had an ‘in use’ battery life of about 20 minutes. I currently use a Galaxy S3 which is just over three years old. I could upgrade I suppose but whilst it’s working well there doesn’t seem much point other than a more sophisticated camera setup which I would hardly use.

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The 1st mobile phones I spotted where @ the Nottingham Car auctions not sure who they where talking to? (Could have been Ernest Wise)

I remember a techie bloke who first to have everything, using one in the tea bar & it rang while he was supposedly talking to someone :biggrin:     

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I've got a mate down in Eastbourne who, when carphones first appeared, he used to keep a plastic toy one in his car and whenever he was about to pass anyone or stopped at traffic lights, he used to pick it up and pretend to be talking to someone. No idea who he was trying to impress? His daughters thought he was barmy.

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Mobile phones go back quite a bit before cellular networks came into being. Before them, you could have a Radiophone fitted in your car for a couple of thousand quid. Until the Post Office introduced System 4 for direct dialling in the early 1970s, calls had to be placed via an operator.

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2 hours ago, Beekay said:

A classic case of " If it ain't broke, don't fix it", Phil.

I’ve got a 1950’s Fergie tractor which ain’t broke. It would cost me a lot to buy a new one and it would be so sophisticated that I couldn’t easily tinker with it. I do have a 1960’s Ford Dexter which is ‘broke’. It needs a new hydraulic pump. I could get the parts and repair it but it would be a pig to reassemble - if you’ve ever seen the internals of a hydraulic pump!

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