Things our parents used to say


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This was something my mother was fond of saying. Has anyone else heard this?

 

“If you want summat doing, do it yoursen

 

Something else she used to say was "m'ont" for "mustn't". Has that been heard elsewhere?

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My grandfather used to say 'mon't' as opposed to mustn't. I have never heard anyone else use the term. He was Nottingham born, although his parents were from Leicestershire.

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3 hours ago, Perrorist said:

This was something my mother was fond of saying. Has anyone else heard this?

 

Something else she used to say was "m'ont" for "mustn't". Has that been heard elsewhere?

 

Both frequently used, usually it was yoe'um mon't, meaning you must not. I seem to remember it used more in Notts/Derby border areas

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My wife uses mont , she use to talk 1950s uckna language which I found hilarious, over the years I have taught her to speak English with a small success .Even now her most used phrase is you mont do that.

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My Paternal Grandma was born and bred in Carlton and she always said You mont do that'. My Mothers family originated from Mansfield and I don't recall any accent at all.

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Both sides of my family were from Bulwell/ Basford and they all used ''MON'T'' as in...

'Gee or'' yo Mon't do that'' else ill getya''............

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Emily Ward, who lived in Garden Street, had a very odd turn of phrase at times.

 

She was born in Castle Donington in 1894.  One of her favourites was, 'What are you agait?' meaning what was I up to? Another, 'We've had we teas.'

 

She and her husband, George, often took my mum, sister and I to the seaside for the day during school holidays. It was a trial of his patience because I was always travel sick (still am unless I'm driving!)  On one occasion, we all had fish and chips at the east coast. Unwrapping hers back in the car, Emily spluttered, 'That's a farting bit of fish!'  My mother was astounded as Emily had never previously used such language in her hearing.  My sister thought it was hilarious and kept repeating it for weeks afterwards.

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To my utter shame, I learned all my swear words from me mum and dad. They were always arguing and fighting. Nowt to be proud of.

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I must confess I don’t recollect the expression ‘mon’t’ either. I came from Woodthorpe where everyone spoke posh. I attended Henry Mellish in Bulwell but no locals went there as it was a county grammar school. However there were contingents from Hucknall, Kimberley and Eastwood and some of those accents were very difficult to comprehend.

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Where I were brought up in Radford, they hadn't spoken English for years. It were pure unadulterated Nottinghamese. 

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12 hours ago, Perrorist said:

This was something my mother was fond of saying. Has anyone else heard this?

 

Perrorist.......I moved your post into an existing thread where it fits along with others of a similar subject. Unfortunately, due to technical complications (i.e. I screwed up) your original heading has been lost, which included an explanation of what you were talking about. 

 

If you can repeat your original heading here, I'll re-insert it back into your opening post. 

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Well I was born and lived in Radford until I was 16. The posh bit mind. I’ve never heard the expression m’ont. First I’ve seen of it is here on these posts. Worked in Mucky Huckna too. Plenty of accents and saying from the miners from all over the uk but never heard it there either. 

 

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@philmayfieldAs you know, I come from Woodthorpe and have never considered myself to be posh!

However, I do remember some of my friends referring to ‘mucky old Arnold’ (sorry to my friends and acquaintances on here who lived there as I know that was probably untrue.)
I didn’t go there very much but I think that it was considered foreign territory once one crossed the old  railway on to Arnot Hill Road.  At one time  I did have a boyfriend who lived in Arnold.

As for saying ‘mon’t’ …. I don’t think I ever did, but I must have heard it somewhere as it sounded vaguely familiar!

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It was sometimes said with an extra syllable as in  mo'ent rather than simply mon't.

But posh folk from Woodborough would miss the difference bein as like they talk proper.  :P

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Another favourite which sounded similar was, 'wunt' in place wouldn't (would not) as in, "He wunt do it when I asked him.

Margie, your saying would be 'Mucky owd Arnold', I  believe.

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1 hour ago, MargieH said:

However, I do remember some of my friends referring to ‘mucky old Arnold’ (sorry to my friends and acquaintances on here who lived there as I know that was probably untrue.)
 

I grew up in Arnold but only went ‘down Arna’ to go to the swimming baths and Library and then at 11 I went to school in Gedling.  My parents would never speak in Nottingham lingo and taught me to always speak properly, in fact when I started Grammar School my English teacher was convinced I’d had elocution lessons, a comment which delighted my parents.  
I must admit that Woodthorpe did seem more upmarket than Arnold in those days and even now I have a friend who says she lives in Woodthorpe when in fact her house is most definitely in Arnold.  

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1 hour ago, Brew said:

It was sometimes said with an extra syllable as in  mo'ent rather than simply mon't.

But posh folk from Woodborough would miss the difference bein as like they talk proper.  :P

Who lived in Woodborough?

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There is a difference between speaking ‘received pronunciation’ (correct English) and speaking posh, which is an affectation. All regions of England have local accents, some being pleasant on the ear, others, such as Brummie or Scouse, not so. I think ‘Nottinghamese’ is more of a lazy way of speaking rather than a true accent. Speaking ‘posh’ is not an indication of higher intelligence. Members of the Royal Family demonstrate this and I’ve  known public school educated people who were as thick as two short planks even though they spoke ‘proper'. We adopt the accent of where we were raised so we can’t do much about it in our early years. Later on we make adjustments to fit into a particular social circle. 

 

 

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I had my leg pulled at grammar school by the Arnold lads who considered ‘Wadthorpe’ to be a bit posh!

When I was at Arno Vale there were quite a few kids who had elocution lessons to make them sound even posher.

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28 minutes ago, philmayfield said:

 and I’ve  known public school educated people who were as thick as two short planks even though they spoke ‘proper'.  

 

Often appearing in films as Upper Class Twit.

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I was also ragged when at Berridge because I spoke differently. My mother thought speaking correctly was very important and I was already involved with The Cooperative Arts Theatre, where we were taught breathing control, voice projection and correct diction. It was all most useful in adult life but attracted snide comments at both Berridge and Manning. Not that it bothered me.

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