Things our parents used to say


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My old mum, now passed, grew up in old St Anne's and knew hard times from being little until she met and married dad, one of her regular sayings was "If you can't afford it wi real money, you can

If anywhere, especially the house, was untidy, my Mum would say. it: 'Looked like Jackie Pownall's' (I believe Pownalls scrap yard was down by the old Vic baths?) Another variation was .'Looks like

Tomlinson, In answer to your question #1387, I used to have some really good Tide Marks on my neck and running up my arms. The back of our house on Hardy's Drive, Gedling was a shared yard, I can'

Probably can't say it now,but i worked with an 'Indian' bloke in the 70s who we all called him 'Gunga Din' he did'nt mind and actually liked it.,i think it stemmed from a Poem,

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Gunga Din is a poem by Rudyard Kipling, and 1939 film based loosely on that starring Cary Grant as a British soldier in the Raj, Gunga Din being a native bearer who finishes up saving the lives of the soldiers in battle with the uprising locals.

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Referring to my grandfather, my grandmother used to say "He wants to know the back of Meg's behind, and how to get there"

I'd think that might refer to somebody wanting to know something in excessive detail, or perhaps just overly inquisitive.

If somebody was being discussed in a conversation but their name was difficult to recall, Dad used to say, "Aye, I know who you mean; walks about on his feet a lot".

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Just been talking about this topic with Mum... apparently my Grandfather, Mums Dad used to say 'where was Moses when the lights went out?' Anyone heard this before!?

Never heard it but its a riddle and a song ! The answer is ........he was in the dark !

The song first seems to have emerged in pantomime in 1878

Where was Moses when the lights went out

He's in the dark (in the dark), he's in the dark (Oh, dark)

Where was Moses when the lights went out

He's in the dark (in the dark), he's in the dark (Oh, how dark)

Where was Moses when the lights went out He's in the dark

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#1583 - "Walks on his feet a lot..." - a friend used to use this, following it up with "and he's got a mouth full of teeth."

Another one on the same lines, heard from my old boss in Southwell; "(His) mother was a Mansfield man".

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#1585. A-ha. When the shilling expired and the lights went out, mam used to say 'Where was Moses when the lights went out' So that's where it came from. A couple of her other sayings.

'Get your elbows off the table!'

And if there was nothing left (of food or whatever) she would say 'Not a skerrick'. I never knew what a skerrick was. Perhaps one of the Basford sayings.

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My dad uused to say that "It will warm the cockles of your heart" but I never did understand why there would be cockles in my heart???

Love the Shippos Ivor, Ivor :)

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Well, I'll go to our house............

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If I did something in defiance of Dad's instructions not too to do it and I hurt myself as a consequence he would say "That's 'Little Man' getting his own back"

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