katyjay

Things our parents used to say

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All my eye Betty Martin could originate from several places one explanation is that 'all my eye' meaning rubbish was the favourite saying of a 18th century Londoner called Betty Martin but there quite a few other theories.

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Ave bin messin arahnd all mornin ' an' nerry a pot washed.

 

Get yer 'air cut, yer robbin' the barber!

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If you needed a haircut in our house, mam would say, if you don't get it cut soon, someone will stick a violin in your hand. 

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A variation on the Ms Martin derogation in our family was "All mi eye an` NELLIE Martin". Seems that there were a few sisters in the Martin family spreading nonsense and rumour!

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If something is right for you, do people still say "That's right up your street".  I know my mum used to say that..

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2 hours ago, Commo said:

A variation on the Ms Martin derogation in our family was "All mi eye an` NELLIE Martin". Seems that there were a few sisters in the Martin family spreading nonsense and rumour!

An expression we still use at our house but we say Betty Boothroyd or Betty Grable!

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If someone( like a nasty old woman neighbour) came out and shouted at us kids while we were playing( not  being a nuisance)  my Dad would come out and tell to ' get back in ',and if he was really mad he would say'Blast your bleddy eyes'no idea what he meant by that.

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We had that last saying in our house Loppy. Also if someone was talking rubbish, what a load of eyewash.

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We had your second saying too, KJ.  I wonder if they ca,me out of the navy.  Me dad was a sailor. ;)

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My mother used to say "Stop Chinning" when we talked to much.

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After coming out with a load of foul language when I were a kid,me dad shouted"Come here, I'll teach you to swear" but I already knew how to swear

he did come out with some strange things

 

Rog

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When coming across someone with, in our opinion, strange ideas, or being awkward or obstreperous, we would label them as" a funny ossity".

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Yesterday, I said something I probably have never said before as I was hanging out the washing.  It was cool and windy with no sun.  I said: "I'll hang it out anyway so it can nop".   I realised that's what my mum used to say.  It meant that the washing would dry off a bit but not get completely dry. I think

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Just found this lot on a Nottingham History site ( And a bit of an old fashioned one it is.. but interesting) :

 

http://www.nottshistory.org.uk/articles/mellorsarticles/bulwell5.htm

 

Quote

Bulwellisms. A number of words are in common use which are obsolete, or colloquial, or "real natives," as surree for sirrah; bargast, a contemptible boy; by leddy, by my lady; by giney, (hard g) and my hiny, for emphasis; snied out, infested; addling, earning; jos-hawk, silly; sally-fardling, dawdling; trapesing, walking aimlessly; titivating, smartening up; nesh, sensitive; galivanting, walking affectedly; nattering, peevish; happing, wrapping; pottering, poking. Have yer made (locked) the door? These, and many others, have been collected by Mr. F. J. Wilkinson.

 

I only ever heard 'by giney' a couple of times from my Grandma.

 

Interesting that  he has 'by leddy'  ( bleddy?)  as 'by my lady'.  I'd always thought 'bleddy' was just a different pronunciation of 'bloody'.

 

But when you get into this lot:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bloody

 

.. it seems that theories include both the 'By my lady' and the 'bloody', derived from various other sources as possible origins.

 

Ah wunt a guessed arfonit miduck...  eyamashed?  :blink:

 

 

 

 

 

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One of my Mum's less ladylike expressions...

 

'Tidy yersen up yer look like a bag o' s**t tied in the middle!'

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Not so much what the parents said, but 1 teenage girl to her pal. She'd hook one arm and tell her mate to 'put yer leg in bed' meaning link arms to walk together.

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When being nasty my mother used to call it being "Feeny".  As in "Don't be such a feeny so-and-so!".  I imagine that Feeny was taken from teh term "Feenian" referring to the Irish revolutionaries who were somewhat murderous in their ootlook and habits.

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Compo, haven't heard that in years, but my Mum, who originated in Dunkirk and then move to Bilborough would often say to Dad, "You feeny bogger" when he was annoying her.

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As a kid I went in the chip shop at the bottom of Farnborough Rd and was told they were frying new potatoes and were  a penny more. I said "Cor Blimey", the man stopped and looked as though he was going to faint. "Do you know what you've just said? -  It means God blind me".    I don't think i ever said it again.

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I didn't know that, Brew.  Now you mention it though it does make sense.  I always thought of it as Cockney slang so never used it.

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