Things you don't see anymore


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Some folks only request information, which is fair enough by me. Maybe they don't want discussion, chat, banter etc. Different people want different things from a forum, and that's fine.  If

Things you don’t see anymore (times 2) A 1945 photo of my aunt, wearing a turban and scrubbing her front door step on Queens Grove, Meadows. She dug her heels in and refused to move when the

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Ben, as well as cheese, didn't  butter used to be delivered in big blocks? I can remember seeing the shop keeper use butter pats to square off a half pound of butter, also weighing half pound of sugar in little blue bags. Used to take a little red book that was used for shopping lists and the price put at the side and totalled up when finished. Some ladies would write a full shopping list and leave it in the shop.

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Tub butter you on about Barrie,,talked about it a lot on here. It came in 112lb Barrels (cwt) and we cut and weighed it into half or one pounds,,then there was lard, that came in 28lb blocks and we cut and weighed that,

Then there was dried fruit,,once a year we weighed Currants,, Raisons, and Sultanas,, Sugar weighing in blue bags i think ended just before I started in 1959,,

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When I  worked at SPD., Glaisdale drive, I  remember delivering lard in blocks. It used to be kept in the depot chill room, along with Stork, Blue Band etc. All part of Van Den Bergs. Funny, but I  can't  remember the other stuff that was kept in there. Margarine like Echo was kept in the general warehouse, whilst the spreadables were in the chill room. I know they were bloody heavy when you had a lot to deliver.

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The lard / fat for dads chippie in the late 50's was delivered in blocks about as big as a small suitcase. Yes, heavy indeed.

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Yes Ben, didn't  they also come with a little net bags as well. Soak the peas overnight with the pill. Wasn't it a soda tablet?

Can't  remember but I  think one struggled to put the peas in the bag after soaking and prior to cooking.

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Remember Mam shouting to me Dad,, ""Hev ya put Peas in soak Ben"""

Twas Saturday night,,and Peas had to be right colour and texture for Sunday dinner,,

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Can you remember being able to buy soaked peas? For the life of me I  cannot recall who sold them. You used to buy them by the pint. They were kept in a large bin and served with a pint beer glass, which was then bagged.

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I remember my sister getting a smack for upsetting a box of dried peas all over the kitchen floor just as we were all getting ready to go out somewhere. Mum had to clean them up before we could go. I was only tiny at the time but have never forgotten it. I also remember being shouted at for pinching the muslin bag to wear as a hat to go with my nurse's outfit. I had a nurse's outfit every Christmas as a child and it was always minus a hat!

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Soaked Peas ?   Most green grocer's would sell them also wet fish shop's but you can buy them to soak your self. I do this then freeze them. 

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Batchelors sell boxes of dried peas. Used to buy them after purchasing the dreaded Pea Shooter ! The grocers must have had to soak them. Wonder what they did with the ones they didn't  sell?

 

As an aside from peas, does anyone remember Fine Fare on Bulwell main street, selling all sorts of loose items in large tubs with plastic flip top lids? These would be corn flakes, porridge, sweets, rice krispies etc. You scooped out what you wanted into a bag and they were weighed. Good idea but if only grotty kids would keep their grubby hands out.

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5 hours ago, benjamin1945 said:

also forgot all these skills i had,/needed

Skinning cheeses

Boning Bacon

Window dressing. .........loved my Marsden days............

Then there's the skill of buttering up the lady customers! Not forgotten that one, have you Ben? ;)

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National Flour in cloth bags with the name printed in blue - frequently infested with all manner of creepy crawlies (although that may have been the poor storage conditions in the shop - the Co-op at the corner of Hucknall High street and Station Road, now Hucknall Sports & Schoolwear Centre).

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3 hours ago, jonab said:

National Flour in cloth bags with the name printed in blue - frequently infested with all manner of creepy crawlies

Reminds me of my father's tale of the National Loaf during the early war years. Bellfield's bakery in Beeston received no more of my grandmother's custom after she found a dead cockroach in one of their loaves! Dad always said the National Loaf was made with sawdust, sweepings and wasn't fit to eat. Perhaps the cockroach ate some.

 

Would never have happened at Marsden's! :blink:

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Did Marsdens ever sell Salmon paste? It came in bowls similar to potted meat, with the greaseproof paper on top. Used to buy it loose as 2oz or 4oz if you were flush. Bet Ben would know. I know you can buy little Shippams pots but they're  not quite the same. Some shops used to sell the empty bowls.

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I remember the salmon paste in those decorative, ceramic bowls, big brother. The paste had a layer of butter on top. Similar with potted beef. Today, it would be a plastic container!

 

Always wondered whether the empty bowls went back for refilling. Our Ben will know.

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Marsdens certainly did sell Salmon Paste,,,someone mentioned Binghams of Sheffield the other day,,,well they delivered to Marsdens 2 or 3 times per week,,,amazing they still going I think,,,

                 Barkers supplied the Potted meat,,think they were more local,,,but only Binghams supplied Salmon paste,,,in those oval shaped pot containers which were returned to them when empty,,,  

                     Qtr of Salmon Paste mrs Williams ?  certainly madam,,,Mr Williams still take Salmon paste sandwiches down Calverton pit ?   gave your Dolly a lift down Teviot the other day in me 'basket'.....yes her Dad saw ya,,not best pleased...…….

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As stated previously Jill, one could buy them when they were empty. I'm  sure my mother in law had one. Think it may have been handed on to us when she passed away in 2005. Have to look for it.

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I always understood that flour should be fine sieved when using it for baking to stop the weevils going in the bowl.   People say it's to get air in the mix but I still think  it's to trap the weevils!  I expect the supermarket bags of flour have already been sieved before being sealed in bags, though.  

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Barkers potted beef...that was it! Norman Hurstfield's grocery shop just round the corner on Alfreton Road stocked that along with tub butter, cheesewire cheese wrapped in greaseproof paper...very deftly...corned beef, cold meats, pastries, etc. Nowt was wrapped in plastic, the carrier bags were made of strong brown paper and string and the sooner we get back to that, the better! Little blue order book went in once a week.

 

Those pots were nice, Beekay. Usually a swirl pattern on the side.

 

Those were the days. F f f f fetch your cloth, our Ben! :rolleyes:

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Typical order in little books ,,wanting delivery on Bestwood estate 1960 ish,, Marsdens,,,

1/2 lb b.b.dividend tea

4lb Sugar

sm tin Nescafe

lb tub butter

lb stork

1/2 lb lean shoulder bacon

1/4 lb shoulder ham

lge tin carnation

tall tin KY Peaches

small tin pink salmon,  john west

2 tins Tarantella tomatoes (flat)

3lb be-ro self raising flour

1oz yeast

12 oz tin FB corned beef

Nice biscuits

Mcvities rich tea

Jacobs fig rolls

2 bravo toilet rolls

Beetop sauce

Jubilee pickled onions (med jar)

 

Orders were usually collated on a friday and delivered saturday morning,,, they were totalled up and put in a ledger,,,a few (not many) had a weeks credit,,others paid on delivery or came in within a couple of days and paid....never had to chase anyone for payment,,,in those days council tenants were the best payers.

i was very happy being a Granville in 1960,,,love to do it all again.........

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