Things you don't see anymore


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Some folks only request information, which is fair enough by me. Maybe they don't want discussion, chat, banter etc. Different people want different things from a forum, and that's fine.  If

Things you don’t see anymore (times 2) A 1945 photo of my aunt, wearing a turban and scrubbing her front door step on Queens Grove, Meadows. She dug her heels in and refused to move when the

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I lay in bed this morning sulking and  remembered  grandmas bolster pillows. I'm not sure if 'bolster' is the proper name or a family name for them. They were long enough to go almost the width of the bed and  as a second function could be laid lengthways to act as a separator when sleeping with siblings.

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I remember my grannies bolster pillows - the went the whole width of the bed and seemed to be filled with crumpled wire - impossible to sleep on without a soft pillow on top. I found out years later that what I thought was wire was actually horsehair.

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My grandfather had a bolster on his bed but it was filled with feathers. I remember the striped covering. I believe it was called ticking. A white linen bolster case was placed over the ticking cover and then feather pillows on top of that.

 

Grandad's bed was a gorgeous brass and black enamel affair. Very decorative. My mother was born in that bed and both my grandparents died in it. From 1913 to 1965, it was the only bed they ever had. Wish I still had it.

 

The base was a metal mesh on top of which was a feather or flock filled mattress, also covered in striped ticking. It had to be shaken every day to redistribute the filling. No springs at all.  I remember the brass castings on the finals of the bed. They were images of a radiant sun.

 

You can buy reproduction brass beds today but not of that quality.

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On 1/27/2020 at 9:55 AM, IAN FINN said:

The old oil cans where you tipped the can pressed the bottom to lubricate things like bicycle chains and the pedal crank when they had a lubricator on them.

Still got one, like the little one on the left and it is still used to oil bike chains, gate hinges, mower linkages etc.

Image result for oil cans collectables

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I bet doctors and hospitals are glad they got rid of them. So many injured thumbs because the numpties that tried to use them did not know how to use them properly. You never held the handle like a tennis racquet you held it with your thumb alongside your fingers.

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Allus found on my 1954 Ford popular, it were easier to turn the engine over without ignition on for a couple of turns, then switch on and one good pull on the handle (thumb out of the way) and the old jalopy would fire up.

The kick back if you got it wrong could be excruciating  !!

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When we first married we brought a "Wolseley 40/40?"  for £10.00 it had a real leather seat, and COLUMN Change Gears, the only thing missing was the Bell on the front of the car, as these cars at the time were used by the Police.

We had the car running well, even went all the way down to Guildford Surrey to visit relatives, using the new road called the M1 but after a while it joined the ex police cars in the sky ps (tell No-one) going around the island near city hospital it gave up, so number plates taken off, 4 coins in the fountain sorry red telephone box, scrap man called, and next day like magic our car had gone.

RIP Wolseley 40/40

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you'r right when first married used to have draped net with frills and tie backs, the only thing was it would take me any thing from 15mins to 1 hour getting all the pleats and frill's even. Then I would stand back and tell myself what a good job i had done,

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I have always hated net curtains, they are just dust gatherers. Did have them though as everyone seemed to. Hated having to take them down as getting them back up you needed arms like Arnold thingymebob (not attempting to spell his last name). I can remember soaking them in glo white as they used to go a dingy grey if you weren’t careful. I got the impression you were judged on the whiteness of your nets!

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On the subject of dingy grey net curtains, have you noticed the revolting colour state of the net curtains at 10 Downing Street and other government buildings that are constantly being shown on British television news programmes? My mother would have had apoplexy if her nets became as bad as that.

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