Things you don't see anymore


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Of course they haven't heard of hot aches...you don't get 'em sitting in front of a screen.We were out at every opportunity,the snow was a giant toy to be played with..... not having a house full of Chinese plastic crap at the time.So of course we overdid it and nearly got frostbite.

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Some folks only request information, which is fair enough by me. Maybe they don't want discussion, chat, banter etc. Different people want different things from a forum, and that's fine.  If

Things you don’t see anymore (times 2) A 1945 photo of my aunt, wearing a turban and scrubbing her front door step on Queens Grove, Meadows. She dug her heels in and refused to move when the

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Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh, frostbite (Hot-aches), rickets, mumps, measles, rubella, scarlet fever, whooping cough, diptheria, dysentry etc...............all the joys of our early years that today's youngsters miss out on!!

:bluespin04:

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Scarlet fever was common in in 1950's, I remember Dr Keavney (Snr) saying "28 days isolation" when I got it, 4 weeks off school! but had to stay indoors, AND missed bonfire night, well I saw my pals light MY bonfire in MY garden, (Actually it persisted down real heavy all night so not that much of a miss,lol

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I never ever heard the words scarlet fever when I was at school from '51 The odd kid still in leg irons from polio...but we were all innoculated against that and diptheria by the mid fifties.

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During the early 80's I worked at City Hospital (Contracting) in one of the older small units with access from Hucknall Road, about 200 yards up from the main entrance. Apparently it had been a Childrens Hospital unit (pre-NHS), for kids with all the previously mentioned ailments + TB, one ward being a kind of Hospice.

At the time all old records were being disposed of (straight in to skips, no Data Protection!!) & I had a look at the ward diary/records, it was heartbreaking how many kids of all ages up to 14 yrs, had passed away from the said diseases/ailments, mostly pre/post WW2.

Obviously it all changed, for the better, after 1950 when large innocyulation programmes got underway in schools for Whooping Cough, Diptheria, Polio & TB, but I still remember some kids at school in the mids 50's with leg irons & others with nasty hacking coughs (thought to be Whooping cough) a strange & frightening sound..........................We have much to be thankful for, re' our NHS, & decisions made by politicians regarding innoculation...........

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I had Scarlatina when i was a kid in the 60s. i dont remember being particularly ill with it - obviously thanks to anti biotics. Apparently Scarlatina was the less severe form of scarlet fever

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Ricketts was very common in children who grew up during the war due to lack of vitamin D and calcium. It was the reason that milk for school children was introduced after the war - only to be later taken away by that wonderful Margaret Thatcher! Interestingly, according to some sources, Ricketts is on the rise again in the U.K.!
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By far and away the best 'cure' for rickets is natural vitimin D , ie sunshine !

The fact that we don't (Seem to) have as much sushine these days could be the real reason for the alledged rise in ricketts cases, and not 'cause Maggie took away free school milk for over 7 year olds in 1971 !!!

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By far and away the best 'cure' for rickets is natural vitimin D , ie sunshine !

Which is why the schools like Ellis pictured were designed so that the whole of the classroom fronts could be opened in summer to the 'health giving fresh air and sunshine'

That was the original intention...although during the fifties I never remember those doors ever being opened...I guess the idea had gone out of fashion by then.

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Going back to hotaches...I've just thought...the most obvious reason they're unheard of nowadays is that frozen little hands aren't stuck too close to naked flames as they were in our day.

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i had two sets of the wax curlers brought them when i worked at little woolworths about 2 bob a set blue for the big rollers pink for the small ones and i think there was also a yellow set that was a medium size held on with white plastic clips that whent over the roller and you hair .

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woolworths was in hockley so was pools for tools, moon cafe[ great meals] gillotts,roses shoe shop ,george hotel .What was the name of the grocery shop that sold lose tea /rice from big bags in front of the counter ,plus all food, tins stuff. the chap always worn a white apron, the shop was on left side going down the hill after the traffic lights ,broad st/stoney st.[lights now gone] a great shop and great service he was always very smart.

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There was a greengrocers on the left nr the top as you faced town, and bottom of the hill same side, was Ashmore's. It was a hardware store, I got a lot of my bottom drawer stuff from there. A neighbour was an agent for that shop, she collected a bit of money each week and you got a 'cheque' to spend in the shop.

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Going down Hockley towards Snienton, on the right was Progressive "shopacheck" in the seventies. Smedleys the butchers was further down just past Woolies. The Moon cafe was great for lunch when i worked at Barker Gate house next to the Bowling alley.

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Just about facing the bottom of Hockley on Lower Parliament street was a row of retail premises that included "Sun Valley Amusements" and I think it was on the corner, a chip shop with a sit-down section that did wonderful fish'n chip lunches. Anyone know the name of that shop during the late 70s/early 80s?

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I really wish I had taken photographs of Nottingham before it was demolished in the 1960s. There are so many places I cannot now remember clearly, getting confused about locations and shop names, etc..

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Mail trolleys with iron wheels on the railway stations. I recall the clatter of the wheels as they trundled over the platforms.

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Someone mentioned loose biscuits. There was a shop just inside the Central Market at the Glasshouse Street end that sold broken biscuits. Broken pieces used to be gathered from the large tins and placed into a single large tin for sale. We school kids used to buy them on our way home in the evenings and spoil our appetites for our tea.

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