Things you don't see anymore


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Some folks only request information, which is fair enough by me. Maybe they don't want discussion, chat, banter etc. Different people want different things from a forum, and that's fine.  If

Things you don’t see anymore (times 2) A 1945 photo of my aunt, wearing a turban and scrubbing her front door step on Queens Grove, Meadows. She dug her heels in and refused to move when the

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On 9/26/2019 at 6:51 PM, Beekay said:

I'm  like Brew CT, I  still use inks and a fountain pen. Trouble is no bugger wants to write to me. It's  all, "I'll text ya, or I'll  email ya". The art of writing seems to be dying.

 

My handwriting has always been appalling and is now becoming painful to execute .  However, when I try to communicate my exquisite erudition and unparallelled prose via the alternate medium of the internet, I'm apt to find myself in receipt of criticism that my offerings are excessively verbose.  One simply cannot win!

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2 hours ago, Compo said:

On the subject of writing; I still use the contents of this packet occasionally. 50+yrs old and still works! 

 

cmxwTSombLMTAidHmZ1E8PF0scdnPR6p2of4mN_v

 

 

 

 

Aahh see thet stuff is Seowth Effrican..  Et says et's Blick. Aah wander if they also did et en Bluy, Grin, and Rid?  :laugh:

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DJ, you have reminded me, with the above,  about the New Zealand accent. When we were there, they were having a heatwave. We would put on the Morning Show on the telly while we got ready. The 2 hosts, a man and a woman would have a little banter. In N.Z. the letter e is pronounced i. So the woman asks the fella, 'are you going to sit on your dick this evening with a cold beyah? No, says he, I'm still working on it, it's not finished yet. We couldn't stop laughing. Next day, she asked if he got it finished? No says he, I'm still hammering nails in my dick. They were completely serious, it all sounded normal to them. 

 

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I remember going for breakfast when our ship was docked and unloading containers in Aukland, the waitress said how would you like your "iggs".

 

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3 hours ago, DJ360 said:

 

My handwriting has always been appalling and is now becoming painful to execute .  However, when I try to communicate my exquisite erudition and unparallelled prose via the alternate medium of the internet, I'm apt to find myself in receipt of criticism that my offerings are excessively verbose.  One simply cannot win!

 

Gerr aht onit, yer only sayin that 'cos it's true...  :rolleyes:

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Americans don't have a clue about cheese - like their mustard - bland and tasteless. The stuff they call Monterey Jack is possibly the worst as, in addition to the already described (non)attributes, it only keeps a few days without becoming covered in a whole fungal garden. Even the US imitations of real cheeses are rubbish. I've heard that they are manufactured to suit the 'American taste' - well, I can quite believe that.

 

The stuff called Cheez Whiz seemed to be straight out of the chemical factory - with a taste to match and a consistency and appearance resembling kaolin poultice (which is another thing you don't see anymore).

 

Regarding the other current post on this thread, not only a toilet roll and a seat but it also has a door. Real luxury there!

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Not all cheeses are bland over here. Tillamook, a cheese company in Oregon, make wonderful mature cheddar, sold in 2lb blocks.  Much more expensive than supermarket brand stuff, but so worth the money.

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Perhaps it's because Oregon is close to Canada - the Canadians do know how to make Cheddar but, again, that's only one amongst hundreds and hundreds of cheeses.

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20 minutes ago, jonab said:

- the Canadians do know how to make Cheddar

A trip to Burtons in the 50s and 60s with my Mum always entailed a bit of cheese-tasting and the purchase of a big block of mature Canadian Cheddar.  

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Do you remember Black Diamond Canadian Cheddar? It used to be sold in small sticks in most places - much like US butter - but Burtons had big blocks of it. We used to buy lbs at a time. My mother used to say it was so strong it made your tabs laugh.

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Burtons Arcade was often a Saturday afternoon treat for me too. The cheese aromas, fish smells, hanging poultry. Fascinating for a small child.

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It was the smells of bacon/hams in Burtons that did it for me as a youngster. A few years later, though, it was E Love (Provisions) on Mansfield Road that provided the food aroma fix. He had all sorts of bacon/ham products hanging in the shop as well as a large variety of cheeses (almost as many types as Burtons but in smaller quantities). E Love (Provisions) was easily identifiable by its bright orange shop front. It was on the left, just up from Bluecoat Street going out of the city towards the Forest.

 

I still get my food odour fix down here where there are loads and loads of charcuteries, fromageries, boulangeries, patisseries etc. selling the most delectable items with almost none of them sweating away wrapped up in airtight plastic shrouds - it's like it used to be in England and so much better for it.

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The Home and Colonial used to be the same. Cheese used to have a rind on it. If it had got a bit of mould, then you just cut it off and carry on. There was a little bakery near the wash house on Denman street and you could buy' stale cake's from them. Some of their past date cakes used to be made into what was known as " Nelson squares", lovely with custard.

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English Cheddar was always the most popular and cheapest about 2/6 per lb,,1960 "" that was the one with Rind""on BK,,at Marsdens of course,, 

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For me, cheese is a staple food. Love it. The moggies like cheddar, just a taste. Brie, caemembert, stilton, anything of that ilk. Dad adored gorgonzola but I wouldn't go that far. Grandad Sparrow's favourite pastime was buying whole smelly cheeses, drilling holes in them, which he filled with port, and then wrapping them up for months, to be brought out at Christmas. If you think that sounds bad, you should have tried grandma Kate's Christmas cake. Even the birds wouldn't eat it. Her culinary skills were very bad and she hated housework. Hmmmm, sounds like me :Shock:

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Forgot to add,, at Marsdens the Cheddar cheese came in big round 80lb pieces,,,and we had to 'skin' em,,,,also forgot all these skills i had,/needed

Skinning cheeses

Boning Bacon

Window dressing. .........loved my Marsden days............

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