katyjay

Things you don't see anymore

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20 minutes ago, jonab said:

- the Canadians do know how to make Cheddar

A trip to Burtons in the 50s and 60s with my Mum always entailed a bit of cheese-tasting and the purchase of a big block of mature Canadian Cheddar.  

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Do you remember Black Diamond Canadian Cheddar? It used to be sold in small sticks in most places - much like US butter - but Burtons had big blocks of it. We used to buy lbs at a time. My mother used to say it was so strong it made your tabs laugh.

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Always liked and bought a cheese that when you took a bite, it would bite back. Extra mature and Spanish onion sandwich.

Nothing like it.

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Burtons Arcade was often a Saturday afternoon treat for me too. The cheese aromas, fish smells, hanging poultry. Fascinating for a small child.

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It was the smells of bacon/hams in Burtons that did it for me as a youngster. A few years later, though, it was E Love (Provisions) on Mansfield Road that provided the food aroma fix. He had all sorts of bacon/ham products hanging in the shop as well as a large variety of cheeses (almost as many types as Burtons but in smaller quantities). E Love (Provisions) was easily identifiable by its bright orange shop front. It was on the left, just up from Bluecoat Street going out of the city towards the Forest.

 

I still get my food odour fix down here where there are loads and loads of charcuteries, fromageries, boulangeries, patisseries etc. selling the most delectable items with almost none of them sweating away wrapped up in airtight plastic shrouds - it's like it used to be in England and so much better for it.

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The Home and Colonial used to be the same. Cheese used to have a rind on it. If it had got a bit of mould, then you just cut it off and carry on. There was a little bakery near the wash house on Denman street and you could buy' stale cake's from them. Some of their past date cakes used to be made into what was known as " Nelson squares", lovely with custard.

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English Cheddar was always the most popular and cheapest about 2/6 per lb,,1960 "" that was the one with Rind""on BK,,at Marsdens of course,, 

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Marsdens cheese on toast Ben? Lovely grub.

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For me, cheese is a staple food. Love it. The moggies like cheddar, just a taste. Brie, caemembert, stilton, anything of that ilk. Dad adored gorgonzola but I wouldn't go that far. Grandad Sparrow's favourite pastime was buying whole smelly cheeses, drilling holes in them, which he filled with port, and then wrapping them up for months, to be brought out at Christmas. If you think that sounds bad, you should have tried grandma Kate's Christmas cake. Even the birds wouldn't eat it. Her culinary skills were very bad and she hated housework. Hmmmm, sounds like me :Shock:

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Brie and bacon or ham on ciabatta in a Panini press....Sheer Heaven !

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Forgot to add,, at Marsdens the Cheddar cheese came in big round 80lb pieces,,,and we had to 'skin' em,,,,also forgot all these skills i had,/needed

Skinning cheeses

Boning Bacon

Window dressing. .........loved my Marsden days............

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Only one Trogg? And the coffee must be like, your able to chew it.

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Ben, as well as cheese, didn't  butter used to be delivered in big blocks? I can remember seeing the shop keeper use butter pats to square off a half pound of butter, also weighing half pound of sugar in little blue bags. Used to take a little red book that was used for shopping lists and the price put at the side and totalled up when finished. Some ladies would write a full shopping list and leave it in the shop.

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Tub butter you on about Barrie,,talked about it a lot on here. It came in 112lb Barrels (cwt) and we cut and weighed it into half or one pounds,,then there was lard, that came in 28lb blocks and we cut and weighed that,

Then there was dried fruit,,once a year we weighed Currants,, Raisons, and Sultanas,, Sugar weighing in blue bags i think ended just before I started in 1959,,

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When I  worked at SPD., Glaisdale drive, I  remember delivering lard in blocks. It used to be kept in the depot chill room, along with Stork, Blue Band etc. All part of Van Den Bergs. Funny, but I  can't  remember the other stuff that was kept in there. Margarine like Echo was kept in the general warehouse, whilst the spreadables were in the chill room. I know they were bloody heavy when you had a lot to deliver.

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The lard / fat for dads chippie in the late 50's was delivered in blocks about as big as a small suitcase. Yes, heavy indeed.

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Where was your dads chippie Fly?

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Yes Ben, didn't  they also come with a little net bags as well. Soak the peas overnight with the pill. Wasn't it a soda tablet?

Can't  remember but I  think one struggled to put the peas in the bag after soaking and prior to cooking.

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Remember Mam shouting to me Dad,, ""Hev ya put Peas in soak Ben"""

Twas Saturday night,,and Peas had to be right colour and texture for Sunday dinner,,

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Can you remember being able to buy soaked peas? For the life of me I  cannot recall who sold them. You used to buy them by the pint. They were kept in a large bin and served with a pint beer glass, which was then bagged.

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Bloomi ell your two your bringing back memories to me steeping tablets, echo ,lard etc. Leybourne Drive and round to the shops on Andover Road comes alive again.

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I remember my sister getting a smack for upsetting a box of dried peas all over the kitchen floor just as we were all getting ready to go out somewhere. Mum had to clean them up before we could go. I was only tiny at the time but have never forgotten it. I also remember being shouted at for pinching the muslin bag to wear as a hat to go with my nurse's outfit. I had a nurse's outfit every Christmas as a child and it was always minus a hat!

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Soaked Peas ?   Most green grocer's would sell them also wet fish shop's but you can buy them to soak your self. I do this then freeze them. 

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