katyjay

Things you don't see anymore

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I expect the 'tins' were tin-plated steel (the same stuff that 'tin cans' are made from).  The tin plate retards any rusting.

I keep a Walkers hammer in my tool wallet for small jobs.

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Ah, sweet cigarettes with cards to collect, late 50s, just like being grown up, walking along pretending to smoke them before consuming ...  matron says I can have my Horlicks and a lie down now, rather have a glass of Sanatogen, though, or take a tablet, Phyllosan, because it fortifies the over forties. Esso Blue, bum, bum, bum, cleans a big, big carpet for less than half a crown, no that can't be right. 

B.

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Aniseed balls with the little black seed? In the middle  haven't seen them for years, remember the song..

Aniseed balls are best, good for your belly and chest you don't get many for half a penny but Aniseed Balls are  best.

Must get out more.

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I did like to buy small sweets, you got more for your money, aniseed balls, mint imperials, dolly mixtures etc.

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I get a large jar of 'retro' sweets at Xmas, I think I've mention before, those sherbet flying saucers don't half mek yer tabs laff...

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15 hours ago, carni said:

Mmmm  mmmmm. I loved Nibbits. A big part of my foody memories. Sunday afternoon, round the back of the Chesterfield Arms. A bottle of pop and either a bag of plain or cheese crisps to last about two hours, then home, just across the road to Hardys Drive,  to Sunday Lunch.

 

 I discovered Pom- Bears a few years ago and thought they were brilliant. There are about five different arm positions in a pack. Best replacement for Nibbits that I had found.

 

Sadly in an attempt to make more profit, the texture of the Pom-bears has got thinner and thinner, until it is difficult to find an intact bear in a pack now. Usually at least one arm or head missing on most bears. The last part of the bag is usually the heads and arms Bless.It has had an affect on the taste as well. Still love them. There is always a six bag pack in my tuck box.:biggrin:

PS BK will give the Tesco and Aldi ones a try. Thanks for the tip.

 

 

I have never heard of Pom Bears..

My Grandma kept the Bestwood Hotel in Bestwood Village up to around the early/mid 60's and he sold Nibb-Bits.  They were in a jar on the counter of the 'Off Sales'.  It was a speacial 'sloped' jar designed to accept a hand grabbing a bag of Nibb Bit's.

 

I saw a Nibbits van on the A 580 some years ago but maybe around the 90's?

 

 

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Does one assume that you eat a Pom Bear like a Jelly Baby, head first and work your way down?

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No preference Kath, you just munch 'em and try to remember Nibbits !

NB. Just stocked up today, 'er indoors is happy now.

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Beekay   the paper carrier bags with string handles cost 4d and could be used over and over again. Ofter they were from the green-grocery's  (spelling not sure )  you would buy King Edwards by the lbs they never came wrapped in a plastic bag. You could also get the brown paper carrier with string handels from Central Market. 

 

Maybe I remember these paper bags as each Saturday I would go shopping with mum, while my borther's stayed in bed.                  Again i drew the short straw.

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How did carrier bags get brought into the equation? I remember the buggers though. Used to cut into your fingers if carrying anything heavy.

And could always guarantee that the bottom would fall out if they got wet, usually about ten yards from your doorstep or when getting on the bus, to go home !

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Keep up Beekay, Mary mentioned carrier bags with string handles a few posts back. You don't see them anymore.

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I never understood why the paper grocery bags in American films didn't have handles. You'd think after a while they'd realise you can't unlock the door with both arms full nor  can you put one down then pick it up again.... Strange people the Muricans...

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Sorry Katyjay, I do try to keep up, as Brew keeps reminding me. I promise to do my best in future, for Queen and Country, plus our colonial friends in Murica. 

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5 hours ago, Beekay said:

How did carrier bags get brought into the equation? I remember the buggers though. Used to cut into your fingers if carrying anything heavy.

And could always guarantee that the bottom would fall out if they got wet, usually about ten yards from your doorstep or when getting on the bus, to go home !

Hi Beekay  see your Sunday at 6 02.

 

xx

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Beer-off's behind the counter  wooden barrels of Wine from the wood,  and Tawney  (not sur of spelling) first one we used to make our own  Port n" Lemon  second  was like a sherry.

Babycham.

Pony,

Barley Wine,

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35 minutes ago, mary1947 said:

Hi Beekay  see your Sunday at 6 02.

 

xx

Forgive my ignorance, but I don't understand, 'see my Sunday at 6.02. ???

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Beekay I have just seen again your comment!!  yes your right my spelling again has let me down, One day my friend i will spell every thing right. So can I trust you to give me a nudge if you see any word spelt wrongly. 

Thanks mary1947

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Cheers Mary1947, but I still don't understand " see your Sunday at 6.02"?

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Priceless Den, Priceless. cool2

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Posters on billboards and factory premises around the city urgently advertising jobs for Overlockers, Lockstitchers,  Finishers and offering good rates of pay. Usually a few in the Evening Post as well.

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^^^^ And Homeworkers.

My Mother worked in the Lace Market as a finisher in the ragtrade making coats for M&S and others,  her boss had as many people, possibly more, working at home than in the factory.

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As a kid I remember seeing the adverts for Overlockers, Lockstitchers etc.

 

I was intrigued because it was like a foreign language; I had no idea what those people did.

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C-T,  I suppose it did look like a Foreign language if you didn't know the trade, my Mum started back at work when I was around 6 or 7yrs old  so I was brought up on the names and was taught to use a Singer and hand sew at an early age.

I've still got my Mums 1931 Singer bought new for her by her Dad when she was 16 and had just started an apprenticeship at Burberrys.

 

I'm sure there used to be other trades advertised on billboards

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