katyjay

Things you don't see anymore

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C.T.

My Mum's is a very similar head to that if not identical but is a full cabinet with doors and was originally treadle powered. (treadle thrown away years ago)

I fitted a motor convertion on it in the 70's or maybe earlier, which is still on and still works.

 

Regards the value, you won't buy a bag of peanuts for what they're worth.

Something to do do with millions being made and thousands of them still around.

If its' still got the treadle you might get 2 bags of peanuts.

 

One of my Daughters in law has 20 or 30 machine heads of various ages, she used to get them for pennies at the end of Farm auctions

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There was a sewing machine on Antiques roadshow last night. It was in the shape of a lion and looked just like a cast iron statue. When the front paws and legs were in place, covering the needle and arm, you would never know it was a sewing machine. Think it was valued at a couple of thousand quid.

img-1596468344474.jpg

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Think I was wrong about the numbers made.

They'd made 16 million by 1900, then changed to letters and numbers for the serial numbers;

https://www.contrado.co.uk/blog/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Singer-Sewing-Machine-Numbers-compressed.pdf

 

Just checked my Mums singer serial number and it dates as 1934, so her Dad must have bought it when completed her apprenticeship at age 19 not when she started at 16.

Possibly my confusion, I've got an oil painting of her done by her Dad at age 16.

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Fairies:wub: You don't see them anymore at the bottom of your garden but I think they've returned!! We have so many toadstools in the lawn that I think they've been hiding. The sun was too hot for them and now as it's been raining for 2 days they've come out of their hiding homes.

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Nonna, I think the Fairies may have moved with the times and now look for Self contained fully fitted residences.

Dancing around outside in all weathers on toadstools is a thing of the past.

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We had a fairy, its name was Nuff...  Many must have seen it because I often heard people say "it's FairyNuff"...    :rolleyes:

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Stuart, don't  you mean, "Elf contained" ?  :rolleyes:

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When I started senior school all the boys had a haversack, either Army or RAF government surplus. I haven't seen schoolkids with one of these for many years but I suppose that's because they were still offloading WWII surplus stock when I were nobbut a young'n.  They were almost exclusively covered with pop group names and other such stuff like their best girl or favourite motorbike name.

sack.jpg

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It wasn't only boys, Compo. My sister had a grey haversack during her time at Peveril, 1961 to 66. 

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Yes, I had an ex-army rucksack. Much more useable than a satchel.

 

Had an ex-Belgian army greatcoat as well for winter. Can’t remember if I got it from Wakefield’s, Flittermans, or somewhere else. It was lovely and warm, but weighed about half a ton when wet.

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All my school uniform  came from the ex Army stores, I was the only Japanese General in the school.

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Almost everyone at Fairham had an ex-army haversack; anyone using a real satchel was considered a sissy and weird.

 

The lettering on haversacks was football teams, current fashionable phrases, and pop or rock groups (and there's a very important distinction between the two). You were either cool or laughable, depending on whether you had Cream or Deep Purple or the Monkees or the Hollies.

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During my last year at the dreaded Manning, I dispensed with the satchel and toted a smallish, red Constellation suitcase. Of course, I was challenged about this by such dubious worthies as the Head Of French and her ilk. It was non regulation, therefore not permitted. My response was to the effect that the volume of homework would not fit into a satchel. True, it wouldn't. 2 or 3 hours a night! Ludicrous!

 

The matter was not taken further. 

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52 minutes ago, Cliff Ton said:

Almost everyone at Fairham had an ex-army haversack; anyone using a real satchel was considered a sissy and weird.

 

:angry::angry::angry:

My satchel carried every text book, every work book, all my writing paraphernalia and, like the new testament in the front pouch, it all fitted exactly. Those with khaki army or blue air force rucksacks were  the hoi polloi so there!!

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Do you ever see the old mash cans these days??

And what about the old gas mask type snap bags??

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I had one of the RAF blue rucksacks,it lasted me all through school and the first few years at work.It was covered in felt pen scribble,the top flap was painted black with Budgie (the rock band not the bird) painted on in red.

 

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Ayup, I  had both mash can and gas mask bag when I worked at Bestwood pit. You can still get the mash cans and enamel mugs but they tend to be in trendy shops and camping shops. Not cheap nowadays. I'd like to get me hands on one so I can decorate it, when I'm a bit better. Stay safe.

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1 hour ago, Brew said:

My satchel carried every text book, every work book,

 

But you have to admit, satchels were very much a minority thing at Fairham !

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Carried by a discerning few you mean... :victory:

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My satchel, bought 59 years ago just before I started Grammar School, spoilt by my fair hand when I got interested in boys and pop groups.  There’s lots of felt-tipping on the inside too.  Just could never bring myself to throw it away .........BB5-AC73-D-AEA8-4-C78-8399-946728-E1-E11

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Quite right too Lizzie, as I told a certain gentleman of this parish, only the better class of people had satchels...    :bighug:

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All of the boys at my school had haversacks - I remember one had Eric is God inscribed on it in biro.  I lived on a council estate, went to Grammar school and had a satchel - was that allowed?!

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When I started work I had an ex WWII gas mask haversack, it was the ideal size for a Tupperware sandwich box and a Thermos flask.

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11 hours ago, LizzieM said:

My satchel, bought 59 years ago just before I started Grammar School, spoilt by my fair hand when I got interested in boys and pop groups.  There’s lots of felt-tipping on the inside too.  Just could never bring myself to throw it away .........

 

The question which has to be asked......who - or what - was Mac ?

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15 hours ago, Cliff Ton said:

Almost everyone at Fairham had an ex-army haversack; anyone using a real satchel was considered a sissy and weird.

 

The lettering on haversacks was football teams, current fashionable phrases, and pop or rock groups (and there's a very important distinction between the two). You were either cool or laughable, depending on whether you had Cream or Deep Purple or the Monkees or the Hollies.


It was just the same at Forest Fields Cliff Ton when I attended 1961-66. Wakefield’s at the bottom of Exchange Walk was where my army haversack came from. Several lads had pale blue RAF ones but the dark blue Royal Navy ones were quite rare. I had my school nickname “MESS” written on mine in large capitals. I used a blue biro and it took me ages. I also had many of Bob Dylan, song titles written on it which used to stimulate debate.

It was in the bottom of my wardrobe for years before I left home.

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