katyjay

Things you don't see anymore

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The word scullery is interesting. The only person I ever heard use it was my grandma in Radford, and she never used the word kitchen, even when she visited our house at Clifton.

 

When did sculleries disappear ?

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My reasoning is that sculleries went out with the dolly tubs and coppers.

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Sculleries ended in 1997........when my Grandma passed away aged 99........

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It’s a word never used in my family although I‘ve heard others use it. My parents were born in The Meadows so we weren’t posh by any means. I’m not even posh now!

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My mum and dad left Nottingham in 1981 to come and live with us and their house had what we all referred to as a scullery.  It was down 2 stone steps from the room where we had most meals.  In the scullery was a sink and draining board, a washing machine and a gas cooker.  Mum did all her cooking in there. 
I do remember that before the twin tub, mum had a ‘copper’ for boiling certain clothes and before that was a dolly tub & a ponch.  There was also a separate wringer.

It was always the scullery to me ..  I believe it was renovated by the new owners and became part of the other room

m

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Even in Woodthorpe some said ‘scullery’, so it wasn’t a local regional word then. We had neighbours on Marlborough Rd., who backed onto our garden, who said ‘scullery‘. The difference between kitchen and scullery can be found on the web. Most of us were not fortunate enough to have both rooms. I suppose the more modern ‘utility room’ has taken the place of the scullery.

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On 10/14/2020 at 11:08 AM, Cliff Ton said:

 

I know the layout you mean, and that was always a bedroom at my grandparent's house. It remained 3-bedroomed as built, whereas yours was obviously 'modernised'.

 

Well we obviously unmodernised then CT. The houses were built in the early 1900’s and my parents moved in 1953 and were the second owners. 
My grandmother, a native of Arnold, used the word scullery but my mum always referred to ‘the pantry’. We lost the pantry when we put the bath in there but there was always a cupboard with fine mesh sides and door in there which was the meat safe. 

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That reminds me of several things.

 

My grandparents moved to Grimston Rd in the late 1930s, so were at least the second occupants. Now you mention it, I remember them having a cupboard with mesh sides in their scullery.

 

We always used the word pantry at Clifton (built early 50s) for the place where food was stored. It was effectively a large cupboard with a stone shelf at waist height for cold items , and then several wooden shelves above.

 

 

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I’ve still got a pantry where we live now!  It’s a walk - in cupboard with shelves where I keep all the food.  It also has other stuff in there like the vacuum cleaner .  We are in a small bungalow so there is no ‘under stairs cupboard’ to keep large items in.   I love my pantry because there’s so much room in it - much more than using wall cupboards to store food.

We don’t still have a meat safe, though!!

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The kitchen at Garden Street was always referred to as the scullery by aunty Emily. Never the kitchen. There was no fridge. It was freezing in winter anyway and never very warm in summer.

 

We had a pantry at Bobbers Mill Road. It had a stone thrall which was meant to keep things cool. There was no light in there and the door locked from the outside so it was a great place for locking my sister in! I've been smacked many times for doing that but it was worth it!

 

My present house still has its original pantry!

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We had a pantry in all of our houses. Here we don't, only cupboards and fridges and freezers.We do have a couple of storage rooms that in summer is coolish and in winter freezing.  

I don't have an airing cupboard and I miss not having one.

After posting I suddenly realized that when I was small our kitchen was called the back kitchen where all the washing up was and I suppose the cooker and oven but can't remember. From there we had what I presume was the dining/ sitting room and then came the  parlour.

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We have a pantry with brick thralls :) So much better than a big modern kitchen with a thousand cupboards and giant fridges,

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Jehovah's Witnesses!  Given the current virus problems, they don't come a knocking on my wee small door. For this relief, much thanks!  Instead, I find they have mail shotted??? the whole road, at whatever it costs to put second class stamps on the envelopes!  Our postman is innumerate, so I received two! Next door's as well!

 

When I thought about it, this exercise made me rather cross. I don't know how much the JWs are spending on this activity but would it not be better spent on donating to food banks to feed those who are experiencing difficulties in feeding their families or, even better, pet food donations?

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I’ve absolutely never understood the mentality of Jehovah’s Winesses or any other religious group who go round knocking randomly on people’s doors and expect to be welcomed or listened to.

 

Does anyone have any figures on their success rate ? (if it can even be measured). Has anyone anywhere ever listened to them or given them anything - apart from abuse and blank looks ?

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I have a friend who loves them. He likes to discuss Darwinian theories of evolution with them. Apparently, they now avoid his house.

 

Many years ago, when I lived in Brinsley, I was in the kitchen, turned round and virtually fell over a strange bloke and child who had managed to get round the back of the house.  I'd got a Bach CD going full blast plus the liquidiser. If they knocked, I didn't hear them!

 

I rudely interrupted his unsolicited spiel by mentioning that I had to get a move on with my cooking as there was a meeting of the coven that evening and I still had my robes to iron, Suddenly, he wasn't there any more.  A most satisfying result! ;)

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Many years ago, we would go once a week to rhe local bar for Karaoke. Ir was all locals in there and we all got on first name basis. We lived out in the boonies, and very rarely got anyone on the doorstep.  One day the bell rings and there stood this lovely couple from Karaoke. Oh hello, says I, all friendly like.  And then they whipped out The Watchtower!  Didn't see that coming. Said no thanks and off they trotted.  

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Some years ago I spotted a nun walking up our drive dressed in a full nun outfit. Before she could knock on the door I opened it and cheerily sent her on her way. I always wonder what her mission might have been!

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And spoilt the strippergrams day!...   smile2

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For some reason although I am fairly normal and rational in most ways I cannot stand nuns. Living near the Minster town of Southwell there are a few of them knocking around. I have to cross over the road or look away. It is a phobia, like some people don’t like spiders. It must not be so rare as it does have a recognised name ‘Sphenisciphobia’

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They are C of E nuns in Southwell but I think it’s a very small community now. Many years ago a nun used to live on Middle Lane in Morton. I don’t know the full story but I did see her!

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I can remember when we lived in Nottingham,  our gp surgery was the Mary Potter health Centre, on Gregory blvd., one of the nurses there was a nun. Can't  recall her name but she was referred to as 'Sister', she was a lovely lady and always had time to talk to you. She still hurt though, with the flu jabs.

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Many years ago I worked with a chap whose parents wanted him to have a decent start to his education and sent him to St Joseph's Preparatory School on Derby Road. Neither he nor his parents were RCs, nor particularly religious at all. Quite why they chose that school, I don't know.

 

Their good intentions backfired.  Malcolm, as an adult, was so traumatised by his experience at the school where all the teachers were nuns that, like letsavagoo, he couldn't bear the sight of one and would cross the road to avoid walking past one.

 

Malcolm and I worked in adjacent offices at Rotheras when the firm was sited on Friar Lane.  I often asked him to expand on the reason for his aversion but he couldn't discuss it. I noticed that, just by bringing up the subject, I was causing him a great deal of stress. Goodness knows what they did to him.

 

Nuns have always fascinated me and, apart from the fact that I cannot subscribe to their beliefs, I could be quite happy living a cloistered life, swanning round in a traditional habit (none of this post Vatican II modernity for me) singing Latin plainchant all day!

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The original Mary Potter was a nun who founded her own order. They wore blue habits, I believe!

 

Blimey, Beekay. You're not that old, are you?

 

Bet I've upset him again now! :blink:

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