katyjay

Nottingham Smells

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Many many years since we were at The Fair, but that photo from RadfordRed was a real memory jerk, I loved the brandy snap and also the gingerbread biscuits, are they still on Sale?

I remember brandy snap also from Wrights in Brighouse, no idea where that was when I was a kid, and very disappointed to see the run down shed in Brighouse where it is made when we moved up here, but still enjoyed eating it!

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My memories of smells'

TCP..............grandads house

BRASSO.............mams house

OLD LEATHER..............Dads railway bag

ALE.............Grandma's house

OLD SPICE............Locarno

FRESH COFFEE...........Marsdens

PERFUME............Mam and her sisters

and many more but i wont go on........

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Jeyes Fluid

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Benjamin, the memory of the aroma in Marsdens in the 50`s of ground coffee and smoked bacon and ham is in my olfactory sense as soon as I read your list.

PS: Good to see You still have time for your cyber friends here despite being on your honeymoon in Venice!!

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When I first read the title of this thread I thought it was an insult!

I still get the occasional whiff from Stoke Bardolph - a very 'earthy' smell (must be when they're spreading the sludge on the fields).

Funny basfordred should mention Jeyes Fluid. Reminds me I've had a can in the garage for ages that I intended to clean the drive with. Should probably get it done before the weather deteriorates...

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Or before the can rusts away and it's all over the garage floor.

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'Suds' used on turning lathes.

From another thread, but deserves repeating here.

I lived on Norton Street early 60s and remember walking past Metalifacture in the summer.

Windows open and lathes etc at basement level you could look down on them and smell the oil swarf (name?)

I seen to remember one of the things they were manufacturing was scissor type car jacks?

Strange what you remember?

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Suds from the factory at the bottom of Rosetta Road, may have been called Smiths not sure.

Walking past the malting's on Eland Street was always a pleasure.

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Mick, the smell of soluable oil used to be strong U/G from the oil tanks for the powered face supports.

Other smells, smog, we always knew there was a smog topside when we got to the Cable Belt to ride up the drift to pit bottome at Clifton.

Cotgrave, the smell of hay being cut end of summer, very strong in pit bottom.

Other smells, top deck of a trolley bus on Monday mornings with a full load of blokes heading to work...Won't elaborate.....LOL

The Trent had it's own smell on winters days when it was warmer than the surrounding air.

Then Cattle Market kind of pooed a bit.

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the smells of the different tanneries turners trent bridge and wades bobbies mill.

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The interesting smell of the engine on the boat from Trent Bridge to the `Pleasure Park' brought many happy memories of joy to come. We had the Bitterlings girl at school with us, and boy did she get ragged when their factory was in full swing.

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Yes suds had it's own smell, not unpleasant, Somebody mentioned Smith Dennis? My dad worked there for years, remember him starting there, then getting promoted to the inspection staff, in the school holidays I used to cycle there at dinnertimes and have my dinner in the works canteen, then in 1974 he took ill,something he never did, had about 2 weeks off, got a final sick note to restart on the monday,but dropped dead with heart attack the day before, on the tuesday a letter came promoting him to head inspector for the whole works, typical!

The other Smith,s, Sydney? at end of rosetta rd/egypt rd was credited with the inventention of the bourden tube pressure gauge

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Driving up Hucknall Rd in the early mornings in the 60s towards the hospital.

I would pass Turners Bakery and there was always a delicious smell of new baked bread.

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Walking from : Hedley Street; smell of Leighs pyclets

Gawthorne St .. smell of bread from Morleys bakery

Duke St., smell of bleach and soap from Weldon & Wilkinsons

Whitbread St, smell of hops from Shipstones brewery

Wilkinson St.. smell of Gerards Soap factory

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Ashley your right Sydney Smiths though as I recall we used to call it the 'brass foundry' even if it wasn't a foundry as such. That block end where the loading bay was located was our play ground.

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Robert Windsor Soap Factory Colwick.

The smell of the soap was so strong it clung to us and when we caught the bus to go home at the end of the day, you would hear the whispers...What's that smell...its the 'Soap Factory Girls'! Have you ever felt unwanted? :huh:

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I bet when it rained, running for the bus, you got a right lather up Carni?

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You bet! Always in a 'Lather' over something. Especially if we missed the bus! Only one thing worse than a bus full of 'Soap Factory Girls', it's a bus full of 'Wet Soap Factory Girls'. Phwoar What a stink!!!

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The only thing that we could smell was Bitterlings, the animal products company on Freeth Street. The stench in the summer could be terrible. I once went inside with a friend who wanted to get some maggots for his elder brother. Once inside I saw piles of chopped up cows and pigs etc. It was quite scary having a cows head looking at you as you moved around. We walked through to the back and went through this door that took you outside to the River Trent. We must have been about 40 feet up from the water where the barges were moored. There were no safety barriers and I can remember looking down at the water and starting to lose my balance. I seemed to sway back and forth for ages but luckily I managed to take a step backwards to safety. A few years later, as a young teenager, I would be diving off the barges and also jumping off the bridges into the River Trent. It's a wonder nobody was ever killed. Another thing that I can remember was the thousands of flies in the summer that came from Bitterlings. My mates and I would get rolled-up newspapers and go up and down Grainger Street killing the flies. Nobody ever complained about the banging on the side of their houses because they knew what we were doing. Bitterlings moved from Freeth Street around 1960/61.

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Micheal, Can you remember the Name of the Plant on the road that leads to Stoke Bardolph. Is that the one you mean. My brother worked there, he said there were all sorts of animals, even pets.

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