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Quote Phil Mayfield,,

I couldn't get black pudding from our farm shop last Saturday. Someone had just been in and bought 20!!

 

Maybe they had  prior knowledge of them being Outlawed soon and were stockpling??

 

Oh Crap, can't say "Outlawed" as Outlaws were usually white Male and should now be represented by all Genders and all races.

 

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Although we dont live in the UK and it may be a different point of view. Here over the years employment or the lack of it has been very different to that in UK. My husband has worked since he was

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Before the indignent hand wringing liberalists and self righteous start their protestations, let's just get one thing straight. The dead criminal deliberately set out to rob yet another old couple, an

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I'd like to see the bonus for the M&S marketing manager that came up with midget/mini idea? Talk about free advertising :Shock:

 

Wonder if they will put them on the top shelf? 

 

Sugar Puffs look out.

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4 hours ago, Beekay said:

They do, in their fortune cookies.

A bit of useless information  for yer, fortune cookies were not invented in China, but in San Francisco. 

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why is it that we can say the nick name  of certain people and no one bats an eye,,   I.E  kiwi for  new zealanders,,, ausies  for autralia,, frogs for the french, paddies for the irish,  jocks for the scots,, limies for the english,, but when you say nigger for the africans, or pakies for the asians the world falls in ,, can some body  give me the answer,, after all they are only words, I am 75yrs old and in my live I have been called some very nasty names ,but I have just shrugged them off,, is it just the P.C brigade trying to control what we say and do,, a case of the tail wagging the dog.... this is a genuine observation

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BAME, black and minority ethnic, is being brought into question now. 'People of colour' is acceptable but 'coloured people' apparently isn't. Depending on the company you're with you can be walking on eggshells every time you open your mouth. I'm of an age where I don't give a stuff!

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Why do they feel the need to mention skin colour. The first Asian woman to walk solo to the South Pole is described, not as  Asian, but as a woman of colour - totally meaningless.

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15 hours ago, don walker said:

why is it that we can say the nick name  of certain people and no one bats an eye,,   I.E  kiwi for  new zealanders,,, ausies  for autralia,, frogs for the french, paddies for the irish,  jocks for the scots,, limies for the english,, but when you say nigger for the africans, or pakies for the asians the world falls in ,, can some body  give me the answer,, after all they are only words, I am 75yrs old and in my live I have been called some very nasty names ,but I have just shrugged them off,, is it just the P.C brigade trying to control what we say and do,, a case of the tail wagging the dog.... this is a genuine observation

Only words you say. Words are very very powerful and it’s naive to think otherwise. I once had a conversation with a lovely West Indian I worked with (died too young RIP) as to why the ‘N’ word was so offensive to black people. It harks back to slavery and colonialism and objectifies and is wrong on so many levels. It is a word I will never use even in private. 
I lived next door to a Muslim man who had a white wife. A lovely couple who would both refer to the corner shop as the Paki shop. I’ve worked with men who were called Jock, Taff, Paddy with no offence intended or taken. 
When I was young I remember my mum telling me I should refer to black people as ‘coloured’ being politer than saying black man or woman but coloured is as I understand it no longer polite. 
Watching an episode of Heartbeat the other day featured a young ‘man of colour’ appearing in the small Yorkshire village and the shock and prejudice he faced. He was called a darkie which was quite shocking to hear in todays climate. I used to work and had official contact with social workers and had to write reports on young people in care or otherwise in need of supervision. People with parents of mixed ethnicity were at one time referred to as half caste. That went out and mixed race was superseded by dual heritage and goodness knows what is an acceptable polite term now. 
If offered a coffee it was always with or without never black or white and I did struggle with that. 

Certain words that were acceptable historically are outlawed now and quite rightly so. A problem arises with historical fiction and films etc. We all know about Guy Gibsons dog being blanked out in the dam busters. Should it be? It’s history and here we have a can of worms. If it’s offensive and it’s omission to a general audience has no impact on the integrity of the story why include it. 
When it comes to midget gems though the word midget isn’t ‘small person specific. Midget submarine etc and it all gets a bit silly. I’m sure some people must sit down and work out what they can find offence in next.

Yes it can get a bit silly but it’s not all silly and words can cause genuine distress and offence.

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I have the diary kept by a lady who was born in 1896. She was a nurse/ambulance driver at the Front during the First World War and involved with the SOE during the second, although she never spoke of it. Brave lady. During a lull in hostilities, she spotted a 'Hun helmet' lying in No Man's Land and, fancying a trophy, walked out to get it. She could clearly see a German sniper watching her every move but she somehow felt that he wouldn't shoot a nurse. He didnt. She got her trophy.

 

The diary relates to her activities during the Second World War when she was with Sue Ryder who later married Leonard Cheshire. She was in various countries and she uses the N word to refer to anyone with a dark skin, usually Arabs whom she clearly didn't like.

 

I never drink coffee with milk and I refer to it as 'black coffee'. Black is said to be the absence of colour.  

 

I recall my mother telling me how, in the early 30s, the sight of anyone who wasn't Caucasian was a very novel event at which people would stop, stare and point their finger.  Not because they were prejudiced but because this was something they had never seen before. Today, if an alien were to walk down the street, no doubt the same thing would happen, simply because the sight of an alien is outside our experience. 

 

Other times, other ways.

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As with the ethnicity issue, most of the older UK generation were not at all sensitive to being called a 'whitety' or 'honky'.

Why are the persons of colour, coloured, black, dual ethnics etc, so sensitive to their ethnic terminology? 

Do these persons have, for some particular reason, a 'chip on their shoulder'?

I would relish the exposure of these misguided individuals who initiated the emergence and subsequent surge of Political Correctness that still has roots in the slavery debate.

Looking into the slavery issue do these individuals really understand that the slave trade was undertaken by their own people including north African tribal exploiters who were interests were in gaining wealth and armaments in suport their particular political and economic ambitions.  

A convenient way around this historic episode is to the place all blame on the white race and any reference to the collusion of coloured slave traders who raided the local communities for people trafficing into slavery is quietly fogotten. 

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Who is this mysterious "They", who say you can't use this word or that word anymore? What happened to 'Free Speech? When, in God's name is 'common sense going to prevail once more.

How long before Judge Dredd types will be walking the streets, watching everything we do.  Free country, my a**e.

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Maybe this is why people don't write letters anymore. They're afraid to put pen to paper anything that might 'offended. I wouldn't be surprised if there is some form of scrutiny on these types of social media. Bring back the "British board of Film Censors" that's what I say, (with tongue firmly in cheek). Better shut up before I'm deleted...

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In my personal opinion, we have regressed to the level of the infant playground where, in order to gain the attention of the teacher on duty, little Johnny (or whatever their name happens to be) goes running up with some trifling tale of a classmate's transgression in order (hopefully) to get someone into trouble. Whether it's parties during lockdown, parties on the eve of Philip's funeral (doubt he'd bat an eyelid), midgets, Guy Gibson's dog, allegations (and that's all they are until proven in a court of law) against royals or statues of people who lived in a different age to whom young folk take an exception (even though those same young folk may be benefiting from an education in some way financed by the person they condemn).

 

It's time the human race grew up and learned to behave itself otherwise than the ego-centered, sticky-faced, wet behind the ears nursery infant.  If it cannot or will not do that, perhaps the best thing would be its discontinuance.

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Moving away from non-white people and to causing offence in general; which clever bugger decided that people such as I and a few others would find being called 'old age pensioners' offensive and 'senior citizens' a more acceptable alternative?

 

Who said it's not school-children it's students, it's not teenagers they're young adults? Did they ever care?

Lunatics and cripples went through too many iterations to mention before becoming learning difficulties and differently abled.

 

The fact remains no matter what  the word is now, it still means the same as it did back in the day before the semantic nazis decided to teach us all manners.

 

I think all books containing words we don't like should be piled high and… oh wait, that's been done…

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Some two thousand years ago when the Romans invaded Britannia my far distant ancestor, known as Albert the Unpleasant, because of his regular attacks of severe flatulence, was captured by a Roman Legion and shipped off to Rome in chains. Sold from the auctioneers block, never to return to this Scepter'd Isle his life of slavery and captivity had commenced. 

Mourned by the people of his village and his wife in particular she immediately commenced a claim for compensation from the Italian Government for the loss of the man she described as "a breath of fresh air".

For around a thousand years the unsettled claim was persued by the family, generation upon generation upon generation, who, traumatised by the injustice were unable to gain a foothold on the ladder of life, unable to succeed, unable to work and instead filled their days with endless moaning and upending statues of Julius Caesar into local rivers.

The claim was finally laid to rest in the 9th Century when another relative was taken by the Vikings, but that is another saga.

The purpose of this story is that if it happened yesterday, pull your socks up, tighten your belt, look to tomorrow, and get over it because the slavery issue gets very boring, unless, of course, the Italian Government decides to pay out at long last.     

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Living in South Africa during the partite they had a lot of different races.

1/ South African    White english speaking carried a card for proof

2/ Afrikaner    Dutch person who came up with the Afrikane's Language

3/ India's   who lived mostley in Durban.

4/ Coloured mixed race who live in the Cape

5/ Bantu   Black race

ps/ used to have a beauty therapist worked for me and I ask her what should i say   and she told me black because I am. Just like you are white.

Never Ever say kaffa to a black person it is very bad word.

When having a drink in the Hotel lounge (not the bar as women are not allowed in the bars this is 70s) The waiter came up to me his name was Nelson, what drink would you like madam, Nelson may I ask you a question? Yes Madam  Nelson what tribe are you from Nelson stood up straight and proudly said  ""ZULU" madam  I felt honored that a Zulu warrior was serving me a drink. Why? i also felt ashamed that a Zulu warrior was waiting on me. If you have never seen the film Zulu then do. Whilst in SA we went oh holiday to Durban and went to see the Zulu Warriors dancing (for want of a better word) when they stamprd there feet the ground trembled and it was scarey. 

Then along came Nelson Mandela    at last FREEDOM !!!!!

When arriving back in the UK my boys were 6 and 4  this black man came into our train carrige my 6  year old straight away said mum Whats that BOY doing in the same carriage as us? now we are not racist but it just goes to show what rubs off.

Who/or What  started racism in SA look back at your history 

YES!!!!! IT WAS THE ENGLISH,   s,o thought of the day 

Its a shame that people can't live and let li

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Mary, that was a really interesting account of your life in S Africa.  Thank you x

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1 hour ago, mary1947 said:

Never Ever say kaffa to a black person it is very bad word.

I did some tooling work in Port Elizabeth and was invited by one of the management to a braai (BBQ). During the evening the houseboy brought me a beer and I said "Thank You". The host took me aside and said "You don't say thank you to a kaffa or they get ideas above their station" I said "If any one does something for me I will say thank you regardless of who or what they are" The host never spoke to me again all evening. Was I upset, not on your life.

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