Craig Strongman

Things that pee you off

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Don't bribe them to do things, just point out that the penalty for not doing it is not worth considering.

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1 hour ago, denshaw said:

I believe  that children are our future, show them all the beauty they possess inside.................

 

 

Den, I agree wholeheartedly - and what a lovely way to express it...

 

However I can also agree with other posts that speak of bad parenting - I'm thinking particularly of those parents who allow the children to 'rule the roost' just because it's an easy option to let them DO exactly what they want, or HAVE exactly what they want, when they want it.    

I'm all for children being given choices in many things,  BUT these choices still need to be under the parents' control.  The parents should always have the ultimate authority.

Time spent talking with (not talking at) your children is so important, so they can learn to empathise with others and slowly learn that the world doesn't just revolve round them!    

Sadly, these 'bad' parents that you speak about have probably not been well parented themselves....

It seems to me that the closing of Children's Centres like Sure Start will only exacerbate the problem.  These places help the parents by showing them how to play and relate to their children.

 

I have much more I could say, but I'll stop now. ...

 

 

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Give your kids a break.........they get it in the neck from all directions  and the word that figures most in their lives is NO''

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If the internet had existed 50 years ago, the parents of that time would've been complaining about ".....youngsters today aren't like they used to be."

 

The youngsters on the receiving end of those complaints are now the adults commenting on today's kids. 

 

It always has been, and always will be.

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Your observation is true Cliffton.  We are all products of our time.  It is difficult to put into words what I want to say without offending somebody, but I'll try.  No offense meant.

 

seems to me that in generations past men were forced to be men.  They started work early and had to work hard.  Many were affected by military call up over the course of two world wars.  Discipline was expected and demanded.  Those who survived came out and became effective in industry and teaching.  They didn't take any lip and they knew how to discipline.  I've been there back in the fifties.  Effeminacy was not tolerated. We were expected to lead.  Today's society is overly effected by psychological ideas that make the aggressor the victim.

 

 The welfare state in all of our western countries is all to eager to hand out our tax dollars to those who will not work, but they seem able to hop in and out of bed with any female silly enough to let them.  If they don't abandon the women or kids they have little idea of how to bring them up and again expect the state to pick up the pieces.  I'm sure there is plenty of infrastructure work needed in all our countries.  What about work for welfare?  The Bible says if a man won't work he shouldn't eat.  Sounds hard, but, it was more like that in times past. I'm not against unemployment insurance for those who lose a job for no fault of their own, but it was never meant to be indefinite.

 

Sorry, I've gone on enough, but I guess you get my drift.  I never wanted state handouts.  I do not consider my pension to be such, I paid into it all my life.

 

History repeats over and over with civilizations that become strong, through hard work, often wealthy, become decadent and fall.  I believe we are in the twilight of Western civilization.

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Well said Loppy. I was made redundant from Plessey in 95, and a week later, my mother died, so I didn't have time to look for another job for three months. Being the person that I am, I carried on paying my NI stamp until I found new employment. I didn't think it was clever, but I thought it the right thing to do.

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But we didn't walk around with green hair, skin piercings rings in our noses like prize bulls, tattoos all over our bodies, we knew what sex we are, in general, we respected the older generation, war memorials, didn't deface things... I could go on, but I'd get keyboard cramps.

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If I could give you a dozen like's John I would.

 

when I moved to Canada I didn't have a job to go to.  So I went to the job centre and then I walked the streets looking, calling in electrical contractors to see if they were hiring.  I didn't figure Canada owed me anything.  I was glad to be allowed in and have a chance.  I was also prepared to do any job going to make a dollar.  It didn't have to be electrical.  I would pump gas or stock store shelves if that was all I could get.  I got a job in appliance servicing after a few days because I didn't have my electricians license yet.  British apprenticeship papers were not enough.

 

My parents had always told me, don't wait for somebody else to help you, gerron yer feet and get moving.

 

No employer would hire you back then if you turned up with green hair and a ring in yer snout.  :rolleyes:

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29 minutes ago, Ayupmeducks said:

But we didn't walk around with green hair, skin piercings rings in our noses like prize bulls, tattoos all over our bodies, we knew what sex we are, in general, we respected the older generation, war memorials, didn't deface things... I could go on, but I'd get keyboard cramps.

 

No, but we had teddyboys who thought flick knives and bike chains were 'cool', skinheads, bovver boys and football hooligans who carried Stanley knives.

Yes a lot of today's kids are waaay to cocky for their own good because they long ago realised that punishment for bad behaviour is non-existent or an ASBO that they flaunt like some sort of trophy. I say a lot, but not the majority.

 

Like many here I grew up in what is euphemistically called an 'inner city area' and it drove me to achieve more than my parents ever did and in turn determined that my children had all the advantages I never had. Did I spoil them? by 1950s standards quite possibly, but they never brought trouble to my door and today  I'm very proud of them.

True I think think the 'touchy feely' brigade have too much influence in society today, always ready with a reason or excuse but never come up with any sort of solution.

Being a parent doesn't come with a manual so we do our best but the only reference we have to go on is the experience  our parents gave us. I't been said before, 'bad parents produce bad children'

 

Clif Ton said it best:

The youngsters on the receiving end of those complaints are now the adults commenting on today's kids. 

It always has been, and always will be.

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Well said Brew. My thinking entirely and similar experience with my children.. 

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21 hours ago, Brew said:

 

True I think think the 'touchy feely' brigade have too much influence in society today, always ready with a reason or excuse but never come up with any sort of solution.

 

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That's called the "Blame" culture, alway's someone else's fault.

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On 7/28/2018 at 4:03 PM, denshaw said:

I believe  that children are our future, show them all the beauty they possess inside.................

 

 

This what keeps me logging back onto read this shite sorry site, superb Den or should that be Whitney?  

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Just come back from the local supermarket, interesting!  We have just introduced country of origin labelling for foods where the packaging must state what percentage of the food is local. Bought some bacon that was 30% Australian content. How did they do that?

In the seafood section there was not one item that was sourced in Australia, Thailand for prawns, China for most of the fish, Vietnam for crab. In a continent surrounded by water and some of the best seafood available locally why do we import this stuff? I wouldn't touch it with a bargepole.

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You're right Oztalgian. We have had origine labels for  years but most of our food is from Italy and theyre very strict at where in the country its produced right down to the farm.

Theres a very wide selection of fruit and veg from every region and chicken and meat is usually local. Fish is another thing , we are not really near the sea ( an hour away) but fish caught there is quickly transported. Supermarkets seem to be the culprits for imported fish.

The Italians are very fussy about where their food comes from and rightly so, we should all be like that and not accept it any other way.

A couple of years ago we used to eat the fish called pangasio ( dont know the english name) until we found an article about it. Apparently it came from Thailand in very dubious origins. Fished from what could only be called infected waters. Put me off for life I wont touch it anymore. If in doubt look at the label.

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France very similar to Italy regarding the origin of food and, like Italy, by far the majority of it is local. A notable exception is the shellfish (fruits de mer) sold in the restaurants on the coast (Monte Carlo, Nice, Cannes, Antibes etc.) - most of the shellfish is imported from Scotland. None the worse for that, though. It is flown down daily and is probably as fresh, or fresher, than similar Scottish shellfish sold in England - of which there is a lot!

 

Regarding Pangasio (Pangasius in Fr.), I saw this once in a supermarket and did some investigation about it. Known as Basa or Vietnamese river cobbler in English. As you say, nonnaB, it does sound quite horrible and there is all sorts of Wiki advice not to eat it, considering its dubious origins (bottom feeding in murky, polluted rivers). Eat it? Never!

 

There isn’t much in the way of shops in Bar sur Loup but Grasse is just down the road with a whole range of traditional French food shops including a fishmonger (very near to the Med.) There are also supermarkets which I avoid as far as possible.

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I’ve been in Tarbert at the top of the Mull of Kintyre and seen a truck being loaded with Scottish caught seafood. This was actual livestock in tanks and the truck did a round trip to Spain each week.

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33 minutes ago, nonnaB said:

oops sorry wrong topic. Meanwhile enjoy a little tour of my neck of the woods

What a great mistake nonnaB. Some wonderful vistas and an interesting history. Not sure about lobbing oranges at each other, don't think I'd like a great big Jaffa whacked at me lughole. Really surprised about the rice and Kiwi fruit.

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We live near the Georgia Piedmont area.  Only difference being the d in the spelling.  Wonder if we have a few Italians up there witthe Hillbillies.   ;)

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40 minutes ago, Commo said:

Love it Jonab, such a beautiful place.

 

It certainly is. You can see why I could never contemplate returning to the UK, I'm sure

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On 8/19/2015 at 4:21 PM, FLY2 said:

Right, House of Fraser here I come

 

Not no more Flea ..... Soon to be Mike Ashley's Sport Direct ....... Not been the same since they arrested those two OAP's in the bogs preforming a lewd act on each other! :Friends:

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Yep, John Lewis for me now RR.

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