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Although we dont live in the UK and it may be a different point of view. Here over the years employment or the lack of it has been very different to that in UK. My husband has worked since he was

I used to be called Victor Meldrew at work so I have been mostly avoiding this thread until now but here are a few things that really pee me off:   # Drivers who don't acknowledge you when y

T'was the night before Christmas and Santa's a wreck... How to live in a world that's politically correct? His workers no longer would answer to "Elves," "Vertically Challenged" they were call

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My wife has instructions to remove them on my demise.

I remember when I arranged my mother’s funeral some years ago the funeral director had so much bling on his wrists and fingers I did begin to wonder where it had come from!

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Brew, if they don't need them, WHY do all tractors come with them??? AND I'm not talking USA, I'm taking world wide, all the older JD's that were petrol had them, albeit smaller than the diesel engined tractors, from small 15HP upwards. Surely there is no difference between engines for road use and land use other than layout, ie cylinders, but we have very large V8's in the 100's of HP range down to three cylinder 15HP. Three cylinder is popular with all makes up to 35HP, then it;s four up to V8's.

Yes, where I live is much more humid than the UK, can get as high as 90% during summer, but California has pretty low humidity, but still, tractors come with water traps.

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Deisel fuel become contaminated by water because diesel fuel absorbs water more than gasoline does. For this reason, many diesel vehicles feature a gadget called a water separator that collects water from the fuel.

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4 hours ago, Ayupmeducks said:

Brew, if they don't need them, WHY do all tractors come with them??

 

I don't actually  know but I said cars... ;)

I suspect tractors and plant do need them. They tend to be filled 'in the field' from bowsers, jerrycans etc. virtually anything that will hold liquid and I imagine jerrycans to be particularly susceptible to containing water.

Heavy plant especially spends all it's life out doors, they're even serviced where they stand so risk of contamination is far greater.

Cars spend 95% of their life parked and the fuel tank is shaded/hidden, a simple water detector in the filter is all they need. Trucks and plant etc are working machines with exposed tanks open to the elements, they guzzle through thousands of gallons, (my trucks averaged 6/7 mpg) and run for hundreds of hours, cars don't.

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I've just looked in both car handbooks and there's no mention of a diesel fuel water drain, neither are there warning lights to indicate water in the fuel. Maybe the filter captures it. My wife's car only requires an oil and filter change at 20,000 miles or every two years so it's obviously not a major concern. In the last year she only did 2,000 and I did around 3,000 in mine which requires an annual change. I've never experienced water in the diesel problems. I did put petrol in my wife's diesel some years ago - but that's another story! 

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I sincerely hope that my son’s diesel Range Rover hasn’t accumulated any water in the fuel while it’s been standing outside his house for the past 3 months while he’s working in Africa.  We’re going to pick it up tomorrow and use it for a couple of weeks as my husband has finally seen sense and realised that getting in and out of a DB11 isn’t as easy as it used to be and is totally impractical so he’s just sold it …….. I don’t like sharing my car! 

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Back in the 60s, as well as diesel fuel being hygroscopic the problem was made worse as excess unused and by then warm fuel would be returned to a cooler metal fuel tank creating condensation. Modern fuel injection systems are far more sophisticated and fuel tanks are mainly plastic and I believe fuel filters now include a water separator so not a lot to worry about. If I had a vehicle with an inline injection pump and a metal fuel tank I would certainly want a water trap.  

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Paraffin waxes in diesel fuels gel in extreme cold weather conditions clogging up the systems. In my Scottish depots before the introduction of 'winter fuel' it was common to add a gallon of petrol to a tank of diesel and failing that to light a small fire under the tank. What's a risk assessment?

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13 minutes ago, davep5491 said:

add a gallon of petrol to a tank of diesel and failing that to light a small fire under the tank.

 

Heh, bin there dun that..  Also air filter off and dangle a burning rag over intake to sart 'em...

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Many moons ago, when we had the motel, in winter when a customer had a diesel engine (usually a pick up truck) they would carry a long extension lead with them.  They would plug in to the electric overnight to stop the diesel freezing. We had really cold nights at 7000ft elev.

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3 hours ago, philmayfield said:

modern derv will contain a winter additive as necessary.

 

 

Diesel was a bugger for frothing up as well when you filled up but it's not a problem  nowadays

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My non involvement experiences with diesels. I once saw a 17.5 ton with the cab tilted forward and a mechanic standing inside the chassis. He was busy working on the injector pumps. Airlock? Water? I don't know but the wagon was stuck half way across Parliament St. so no pressure on him. 

A few weeks ago I passed a car on a motorway hard shoulder and it was spewing white exhaust smoke out all across the road from, i guess, a runaway diesel. Not sure how you deal with one of those if it's getting combustible fuel from somewhere. Light smoke; sump oil?

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Brew, tractor fuel tanks are under the engine cover, not open to the elements much like car tanks are. Big rigs, the tractors that haul the 40 ton trailers down the hwy's are open to the elements, not sure if they have water traps, I'd have to ask a trucker.

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There are other reasons for a diesel to emit white smoke but the most common is a blown head gasket...

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