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Bombed Buildings

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Trickymicky    53

Thanks PP and Cliff Ton. I have one of the enamel badges somewhere, if i ever find it i will post a pic. Pretty sure that was their purpose as there was another peculiarity about them, it may not have been East Riding on them it was an area which didnt actually exist.

PP, I served my apprenticeship there but started in 1972. The facilities were excellent for my motorcycle interests, although getting my bike bits out again was not always as easy, as security was tight.

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Manversboy    34

Just to add a family story to this interesting thread.

My family lived around the Carlton Rd/Thorneywood area and I can recall my Mum telling me that there was a house on a street corner that faced onto Carlton Rd that had been bombed in BOTH world wars. It's about 55 years since she told me this but I looked at the map posteed earlier that showed the bomb impacts and it does look as if the street was Lancaster Road. I think I recall her saying that in WW1 the bomb fell outside the house in the street but the WW2 bomb demolished the place - or it could have been the other way around! :laugh: Either way, she said that was an unlucky house to live in!

I also recall Mum telling me Nottm was only lightly bombed c/w Coventry, etc because "we bent the beams", which was a mystery to me at the time but after spending my working life in electronics I now realise she meant the German radio beams that guided the bombers and which we successfully jammed, apart from the night Coventry got it when the jamming was incorrectly done by the RAF.

MB

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jangar    1

re Sneinton bombings. Great Aunt Liz (nee Simpson born 1883) lived in Sneinton at this exact time. She had a son Alfie and daughter Elsie. Married surname unknown. She was out the next morning picking through checking for neighbours. Any recognition of the family please? (not much to go on- sorry)

Other family member at the hospital dealing with the burn victims from the bombed bakery who were splattered with dough which was then baked into their skin by the heat. Uncle said they scrapped down the layers of dough day by day til they got to the skin. All the hurt men had tracheotomies and had their heads bandaged up, more than a dozen of them in a row in the ward.

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SPIKEISLAND9    46

In addition to the bomb sites pinpointed in Firbeck`s map at #23, a photo on PTP and also published in N. Post, shows a

badly damaged house in 1941 on Ribblesdale Rd., Daybrook.

My interest is in a another property in similar condition, close by, in the mid 1940`s. Behind the `Five Ways` hotel and to

its North, was the remains of the delightful looking property, `Daybrook Vale House` with its small lake formed by a concrete

dam across the Day brook. The grounds of the property fronted onto Edwards Lane and the driveway to the house was very

close to the line of the current `Larwood Close.`

In the left hand corner of the Ted`s Ln/driveway junction, was the damaged dwelling, indicated on maps of the time as `lodge`

(Not to be confused with the lodge across the road which still exists and is slightly higher up Ted`s Ln. in the hospital grounds.)

From around 1945, as 5 year olds, we all knew it as `The bombed house.` We wouldn`t have invented the name, it will

have been hearsay from elders and adults. I`ve never seen it mentioned when Nottm. bomb damage is discussed but if a

ruler is placed on a map across the site of that house and any point on Ribblesdale, even the furthest near the `Roxy`, it

would have only been a matter of seconds to cover that distance in a plane.

Ribblesdale at that time was only developed at its ends, about two or three houses a year were built, tubs n poles for anyone

in the game.

Any thoughts anyone?

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NewBasfordlad    2,903

The area your talking about behind the 5 Ways pub was in fact the training ground for the Civil Defence in the early 60s.

There were several deliberately partially demolished house's, Nissan huts for classrooms and an underground nuclear bunker. This all started to vanish later in the 60s when the CD was wound up.

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Radio Pod    1

My mum lived in the Daybrook Vale house for 5 years when it was civil defence.

Her dad (my grandad) was head of training. My mum often took part in operations as a girl and had to be "rescued".

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Radio Pod    1

In response to Ashley re: the lone fighter and the bullet holes in the church; when my dad was a baby he was in his pram outside on Melton Street and he said that he was almost hit by a single plane offloading it's spare bullets so that would tie in with the church on Arkwright Street. He was born in December 1940 so it was probably spring/summer of 1941?

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Cliff Ton    5,982
On 13/11/2015 at 3:26 PM, NewBasfordlad said:

The area your talking about behind the 5 Ways pub was in fact the training ground for the Civil Defence in the early 60s.  There were several deliberately partially demolished house's, Nissan huts for classrooms and an underground nuclear bunker. This all started to vanish later in the 60s when the CD was wound up.

 

1 hour ago, Radio Pod said:

My mum lived in the Daybrook Vale house for 5 years when it was civil defence.

 

Surprising but the place is actually marked (upper centre) on maps from the 1950s.  Five Ways in the lower centre.

 

five%20ways_zpspc8hf7f7.jpg

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Jill Sparrow    4,472

I have seen a photograph of the devastated St. Christopher's church in Sneinton which was a casualty of the Luftwaffe. It showed the vicar conducting a Service among the rubble.  He was, in fact, Rev F G Ralph, an RAF padre who later became vicar of St Peter's church in Old Radford and officiated at the marriage of my parents on 25 June 1949. He appears on their wedding photos, his ecclesiastical stolla decorated with wings!

 

My mother said he was a lovely man. I've tried to research what happened to him after he left St Peter's in the 50s but without success.

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DaveN    833

There is a book titled "Battle Of The Flames (Nottinghamshire's fight for survival in WW11) by David Needham, published by Horizon Press. Included in it are details of the bombing, lots of photographs and a list of fatal casualties. I have had the book for a number of years.

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NewBasfordlad    2,903

Hi Radio Pod and welcome to the mad house.

 

If your Granddad was there in the early/mid 60s I would have spent many a happy hour being chased by him, may even have 'rescued' your Mam

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IAN123.    350

We've touched on the likes of Co- op bakery before, seem to recall Boots Gymnasium was destroyed and the old Central Library near Bilbe Walk was damaged.

Are there any books solely dedicated to WW2 bombings in Nottm?

Can't locate anything.

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Rob.L    673

The Evening Post brought out a book in 1995 called "Nottingham's War" (price £5.99) which had plenty of pictures of damage to the city following the blitz of May 1941, as well as articles on life during the war and how the people of Nottingham did their bit.

 

You might be lucky and find a copy in a charity shop.

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FLY2    7,747

eBay or Amazon, I picked up a couple several years ago. About £8 if I remember rightly.

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IAN123.    350

Looks like the Library copped a few from a Heinkel!

I was always told the railings from the

Registary Office went to the war effort.

Looks like they got buckled here!

This was the college bit that took the brunt.

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LizzieM    5,325

Even my great grandfather’s grandfather clock had to give up its weights for the war effort.  We now have the clock in our house here  in Nottingham, minus the original weights. 

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IAN123.    350

According to war propaganda history files..most of folks possessions that were donated were useless and not the right content For the war

effort... but considered a good way of bonding a nation.

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