Scriv

Nottingham Hauliers

Recommended Posts

Cracking video and truck, Sammy Longstone was nearly all 8 leg Fodens.

 

Remember one particular occasion back in the late 60s, one of the drivers had took his truck home ready for an early start in the morning and as usual had raised the back end slightly to run any rain off. Got up half a sleep and off he went forgetting the PTO, 200 yards railway bridge, back end in the road, came clean off the chassis, back to Sammy's pick up your cards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bet they wish that all the lorries were that clean nowadays.

I have never seen an 8 wheel tipper that clean.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^Funny you should say that Rog when I was watching the video of the restored Foden, that very thought sprang to mind watching him using the splitter doubt now many would know what it is, never mind how to use it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/2/2018 at 9:39 PM, NewBasfordlad said:

Lost art these days Ian I would take a bet not many of todays drivers could rope and sheet a load.

They're not damn well allowed to!

 

Some great genius a few years ago decreed that roping and sheeting was no longer suitable for securing flatbed loads because (you're not going to believe this) the ropes haven't been individually strength tested.

 

Anyoner who's done it (I could but would not claim to have ever mastered the art) knows that if it's done properly, you can tip the damn lorry upside down and shake it and nowt will  move!

  • Like 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^^^^Might have known HSE would get involved.

 

Wonder if the person who made that particular ruling had ever seen the tension on the ropes when its done properly... the answer of course would be a resounding NO!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The end result is that roads are now littered with broken ratchet straps, the hooks and tensioners of which are lethal to motorcycles.

 

Everything now has to be secured to the loadbed; internal straps on curtainsider trailers are pretty much banned. VOSA, or DVSA as rhey're now called, are self-financing and much depends if you get pulled on how well you pass the attitude test.

 

I got my first lessons at BRS Langley Mill about 1984; I was FLT driving there for Mayday.Liverpool trunk used to roll in 20 ton of John West tinned goods all stacked on pallets. Driver used to reload with Hammonds sauce and after I'd watched him sheet up in awe a few times he started letting me help him. That bloke was an absolute master, at the back of the trailer two fins went down to the corners inch-perfect and you could swear he'd ironed it.

 

Trust me you'll be glad you don't drive HGV these days.As we both know there was no finer sight to an experienced driver than to stand back from roping and sheeting a load and seeing every fold, crease and dolly perfectly positioned. Horrible job on a cold wet day I admit but it certainly separated the drivers from the steering wheel attendants.

 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drove for clearways in the 80s leyland boxer and they also had a seddon atkinson  chinese six the gear shift was the other way round first and second away from you played some tunes on that  meeowed

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On April 20, 2018 at 2:51 PM, Scriv said:

They're not damn well allowed to!

 

Some great genius a few years ago decreed that roping and sheeting was no longer suitable for securing flatbed loads because (you're not going to believe this) the ropes haven't been individually strength tested.

 

Anyoner who's done it (I could but would not claim to have ever mastered the art) knows that if it's done properly, you can tip the damn lorry upside down and shake it and nowt will  move!

I was at sea and ropes were used to not only secure the ships (polypropylene mooring ropes) but for lifting and securing almost everything. Each rope has a Safe Woking Load measured in tonnes / tons and certificate to that effect is supplied with it and had to be kept on file for inspection. I can’t remember the formulas but splicing and knotting the rope reduces the SWL. It is apparent to me that the reason they stopped securing loads with ropes is because, like almost everything else these days, they stopped training people properly.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I passed my hgv test my instructor told me you had better drive a box wagon You will never hold a load on roping and sheeting  Then curtain siders came along much easier I worked for wheldons the dyers and when I got a job at clearways The gaffer Frank had bought the wagons from wheldons when they went bust I finished up back in my old wagon 206 a leyland boxer I really dont know how they get anything delivered these days with the state of the roads and the traffic  meeowed

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Bampton Packaging Ian? Used to do a fair bit for them when I was on Mayday; they'd moved down Lenton Lane by then. Might even have driven that D Series Ford, they had one of those and a Cargo when I was there.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Weren't a bad little job that; used to do a lot of crates up to East Mids Airport for the exporters.

 

Another one I remember well from my days at Mayday was Randalls, the plumbers' merchants on George Street. And Fords, just round the corner; once you got in with them and could remember where all the shops were, they'd always ask for you to come back. Only downside was the crap hours, never any overtime; but it was a doddle of a job.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chettles Yard Peters St.68397.1.640.640.UNPAD.jpgNot a bad workhorse, them Scania's.

Wonder if Roger broke down that XJ?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was "Atlas Express" a Notts firm? I remember as a small boy at primary school we were advised to buy an atlas of the world to help in classwork.   We never had much in the way of spare money so an atlas would have to wait until birthday or christmas but I digress.... I used to see Atlas Express lorries driving around and I actually thought that these lorries were full of atlases  for delivery to shops.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They had depots all over the UK.... did overnight parcel delivery long before  TNT and the like. They were bought out by United Carriers and closed down in the late 1980's.

 

Found this video from the early 1960's;

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wvd5Y_maKQc&feature=youtu.be

 

The "cross-docking" system was still pretty much the same when i worked for Rainbows in the late 1980's. Barcodes and mechanisation swept that all away.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My old Dad told me stories that he had his legs in sacks when driving Queen Marys..you could not stop at lights if turning left or right..you'd never make it..he would hold back for green or plough on..standing up and using body weight to turn..they must have been 50 feet long?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi i have just come across this post i worked for bill kelly when he had a place on northgate with derek hayman bob rutter and mick roth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/9/2018 at 5:08 PM, chalky57 said:

Hi i have just come across this post i worked for bill kelly when he had a place on northgate with derek hayman bob rutter and mick roth.

 

 

Knew 'em all Chalky, but they were at Langley Mill when I worked for Bill. Bob has passed on, but as far as I know Derek is still alive. Mick Roth was living with Johnny Knowles' ex, the red-headed girl; was her name Lynn?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew a Mick Roth in Boowul around 1965 or 6.  He was a tallish blond haired lad.  He rode an Ariel Arrow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

On 10/10/2018 at 10:15 PM, Scriv said:

Knew 'em all Chalky, but they were at Langley Mill when I worked for Bill. Bob has passed on, but as far as I know Derek is still alive. Mick Roth was living with Johnny Knowles' ex, the red-headed girl; was her name Lynn?

Yes mate I think her name was Lynn some of them were right characters but they were certainly the good old days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...