mariag

What are you reading at the moment?

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Re #155. I don't know most of HER lot Lizzie, in fact most of them look the same to me. LOL

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When the abode is all quiet ( like 1.34am).. it's a great time to read,too cold for Lucy the Lab..she's on my feet- whilst i re-read the first of Dirk Bogarde's-

' A postillion struck by lightning' simply wonderful for time being caught in word.

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Penguins Stopped Play. [Harry Thompson].  An amusing book about the Captain Scott XI amateur cricket team and their adventures throughout the world.

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On ‎17‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 1:10 PM, radfordred said:

Joey Barton - No Nonsense 

 

What a thoroughly nasty piece of work Barton is. I'm glad we stuffed him today.

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Just finished reading Terry Pratchett's "Raising Steam". I would say this is a MUST for all fans of railways.

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Just finished 'Selected Short Stories' by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (1863-1944), whose pen name was simply "Q".  The book was first published in 1957 by Penguin and contains stories based mostly in the Georgian/Victorian era and written mostly around the turn of the 20th century and previously published in other collections.  The collection contained some interesting stories that took me back in time in my imagination.

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Just discovered a new (to me) author, Christopher Brookmyre. I have almost finished the first book in a series called Quite Ugly One Morning. Set in Edinburgh, a great murder mystery with a lot of black humour thrown in.  Main character Jack Parlabane is an investigative journalist. Very entertaining.

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The View From the Corner Shop: The Diary of a Yorkshire Shop Assistant in Wartime by Kathleen Hey and Robert Malcolmson.  It is written for the Mass Observation during WW2. So far it is quite mundane and all about rationing, but has the odd bit of humour.  Unless it gets better I may have to give up on it!

Only bought it cos it was 99p from Amazon (on Kindle).

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I inherited a book that has sat unread on the shelf for many years, so I am giving it a read.  I thought it would be dreadful but to my surprise, it is turning out to be a great read:

Journal of a voyage Round the World. Charles Darwin. First published 1842. This edition 1890. It is his journal as the naturalist of HMS Beagle in her voyage of exploration around the world from 1832-1836.  It contains over 600 pages of small print, written in the Victorian style and Victorian language.  Not the easiest of books to read but it is turning out to be well worth the effort.  This particular book was awarded as a prize to a scholar in Bolton High School for achievements in mathematics and is signed, presumably by the headmaster of the day - which is nice :)

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With reference to the preceding post: It is interesting to read Darwin's theories of how the Andes were formed and his ideas on other geological structures/flora & fauna, etc.. However, it seemed odd that he referred to Miasma, bad vapours and Ague in a positively medieval description of seasonal and water borne disease in Peru.  Although he knew nothing of Plate Techtonics he managed to reason the existence of such a force but still clung to the idea of bad air being the cause of such diseases as Cholera and Malaria.

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Just bought Neil Gaiman's 'Norse Mythology'. Can't wait to get into it but I don't want to nibble. I'll wait until I've got an hour free.

(I'm a Gaiman groupie)

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Just finished another Christopher Brookmyre, a standalone book called One Fine Day in the Middle of the Night. A rollicking good yarn, made me laugh out loud a couple of times, good job I wasn't in public! 

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At the moment reading a Stuart Macbride book  Cold Granite, I have to keep putting it down, the story line is good, very real, but it's about children going missing and they mostly end up dead.

So you can see why it's taking a long time to read.

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Im reading poems from WW1.

 

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"It's not about the bike" by Lance Armstrong

 

Rog

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I don't read fiction  - I have a library full of non-fiction, mainly about aviation and films/cinema. I buy a book of interest, read it and then shelve it. Around about two years later I read it again, and such is my memory that I had forgotten most of what I had read and what I read again seems new. This is what I am doing now with an extremely interesting book about the Titanic,. titled Titanic, the Ship That Never Sank.

   It tells everything about the ship, and its sister ship the Olympic, from the time they were completed, and in the case of the Titanic until the time it rested on the bottom of the ocean. Or does it? The main thrust of the book is that it is the Olympic that hit the iceberg and sank. The evidence is strong; but is it convincing?

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Probably as convincing as Elvis Presley working as a petrol pump attendant, Lord Lucan living the life of a hippy in Goa or Princess Diana being disguised as one of Mother Theresa's nuns! Why can't people accept facts? There always has to be a conspiracy theory or someone desperate to write books about things they can't prove.

 

I'd be the first to admit that I rarely believe what anyone tells me but some of these tales beggar belief.

 

I suppose you've read the one about the Philadelphia Experiment, Chulla?

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272.  There are quite a few things I tend to wonder about.  Not so much Elvis pumping gas.  They have been around since his death.  There are however quite a few world events that have aspects that do not add up.  I tend to keep them to myself rather than be labeled a conspiracy theorist which tends to be a pejorative term.  Folks then tend to reject everything you say because, it's just that crazy conspiracy theorist again.  Truth is often stranger than fiction.:rolleyes:

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Just finished a book, Ozark Diary by Minnie J Sellens, she  was born in the early 1900's and puts life as it was back then, and what was passed down to her from her Mother Gran etc. Very interesting book of how  life was like in southern Missouri and Arkansas Ozarks. How they butchered a hog and preserved the meat, life without an automobile, what they did to pass the time..

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