Mister T

Peveril Street

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Does anyone remember Peveril Street in the 50s? I lived there as a small child, and seeing the area again after years of being far from Nottingham I am not surprisingly struck by how much has changed.

Near the bottom was a shop called the Scientific Exchange, or something similar, and I believe it later expanded quite a bit, but it now seems to have vanished. There may also have been a shoe shop called Machin's. Further up, and probably on Alfreton Road was Temple's newsagent, and just down the road from it was what I remember rather uncertainly as a wine shop. I do not recall the name of the business, but the owner had two daughters called Hilary and (appropriately) Cherie. They no doubt had nothing to do with Clinton and Blair.

Across Alfreton Road near this point was a scrapyard that if I remember right was proclaimed by a sign saying "Charles Pownall", though my dad once referred to it as "Jack Pownall's". There may also have been a children's play park nearby.

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I knew Peveril Street in the 60’s and you are quite correct. There was a Scientific Exchange a little way up on the left. I lived in Radford and used to ride my push bike up there and drool at the kit. I seem to recall they sold things like metal detectors, guitar amps, walkie talkies telescopes and the like. I knew Machins as a Machins jeans not a shoe shop and this was up Peveril Street near the top in the late 60’s. We used to get our stay press and Ben Shermans there. My wife was born on Alfreton Road at her Grandparents who owned Flints newsagents which was next to Erics shoe shop opposite the Alma. She knew Phillip and Stephen Machin and one or both eventually took over from their parents and ran the shop. It was quite popular at one time and advertised on local radio. I recall the jingle ‘Get your jeans down at Machins’. I think they relocated to Arnold way near the Long bow pub and may still be going although Stephen Machin was working at House of Fraser in Vic Centre not long ago. It’s quite possible that it was a shoe shop at some point and diverted to jeans as my wife seems to think there was a Machins shoe shop but this was really before our time.

There was Skills toy shop right at the top and a newsagents nextdoor or nearby. My dad knew one of the chaps at Skills from his days in the forces.

There was a wine shop according to the wife, a double fronted place but we were too young to take notice.

I recall Jackie Pownall as having a row of shops on Alfreton Road below the Hartly Road junction going towards Player Street. Big gloomy shops that I think were more storage than selling as I can never remember them open but I don’t recall a yard. Perhaps it was behind the shops. All demolished now.

It has all changed now. Shame really but that progress.

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Peveril Street trivia:

There was a clockmaker on Perveril Street, Hallam & Son (1849 - 1856ish)

I have a longcase clock, made by Hallam & Son in 1850, family owned from new and it has been through 5 generations, still works, strikes the hours and keeps very good time.

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I remember passing Jackie Pownalls on the number 22 bus, and it was behind corrugated iron sheeting, on a corner. I only remember him taking old clothing, or rags as we called them, and giving you money for them. He may have taken scrap as well, but I don't remember it.

Kath

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Yard was full of scrap...used to sell him lead and buy pram wheels for the trolleys we built as a kid. Scientific exchange had shops both sides at one time...Not forgetting Marshall and Hancocks the ironmongers at the top...

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I remember breaking up an upright piano, in our back yard on Aspley Lane, and colecting all the lead weights from the end of the keys.

It took me about 2 days, I was 12 yrs old in 1953, and then I took all the lead (walked) to Pownalls on Alfreton Road, near Radford Baths............I got 1s & 3d (about 6p now), boy was I rich!! Palm Toffee, Jubblies and other delights, for a whole week!!

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I remember Flints Newsagent opposite the Alma Inn too, but could not remember the name.

Just round the corner on the top of Hartley Road was a Butcher, big fat guy. I delivered his meat as far as Aspley

and Bilborough. On a big old bike with a basket on the front with only a white coat for PPE! against the snow and wind.

I WAS the forerunner of the Hovis add! Anyone know that butchers name?

On Alfreton Road below Bentinck road on the first street corner on the right was a sweet shop where I bought packs of collectors cards

with a small square flat peice of chewing gum included.

A little further down on the right was a house with a big sign on it for a Plumber? The name Frank Webb comes to mind?

Opposite that near Wimbourne Road was a Barbers shop. I remember him giving me advice on applying for a job, as a 14 year old.

"Always put your nationality as English NOT BRITISH" Putting that today would scupper your chances of getting the job.

inthebin.gif

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Ayup Mick,,

Frank Webb plumbers went to Convent street at the back of the Palais,don't know if they are still there though, mate of mine took over running the business after his uncle retired (not called Frank Webb by the way)

Rog

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I knew Peveril Street in the 60’s and you are quite correct. There was a Scientific Exchange a little way up on the left. I lived in Radford and used to ride my push bike up there and drool at the kit. I seem to recall they sold things like metal detectors, guitar amps, walkie talkies telescopes and the like. I knew Machins as a Machins jeans not a shoe shop and this was up Peveril Street near the top in the late 60’s. We used to get our stay press and Ben Shermans there. My wife was born on Alfreton Road at her Grandparents who owned Flints newsagents which was next to Erics shoe shop opposite the Alma. She knew Phillip and Stephen Machin and one or both eventually took over from their parents and ran the shop. It was quite popular at one time and advertised on local radio. I recall the jingle ‘Get your jeans down at Machins’. I think they relocated to Arnold way near the Long bow pub and may still be going although Stephen Machin was working at House of Fraser in Vic Centre not long ago. It’s quite possible that it was a shoe shop at some point and diverted to jeans as my wife seems to think there was a Machins shoe shop but this was really before our time.

There was Skills toy shop right at the top and a newsagents nextdoor or nearby. My dad knew one of the chaps at Skills from his days in the forces.

There was a wine shop according to the wife, a double fronted place but we were too young to take notice.

I recall Jackie Pownall as having a row of shops on Alfreton Road below the Hartly Road junction going towards Player Street. Big gloomy shops that I think were more storage than selling as I can never remember them open but I don’t recall a yard. Perhaps it was behind the shops. All demolished now.

It has all changed now. Shame really but that progress.

Letsavagoo,

~Twas I, in my radio disguise of Craig Strong who did the voice overs for Machins jeans ads!

Steve and I have been mates for as long as I can remember, and he used to do my paperwork (PRS forms) when I did the soul and dance shows on Radio Trent.

Another coincidence is that whilst doing karate at Carlton Forum, one of the people there was Bill Ingle, who most people hated partnering, as he had such bony wrists that hurt you like a blunt sword on your wrist bones whilst doing the exercises! Anyway, we got to know each other, and I ended up working for him part time in the hifi department, the shop by then (mid 70's) had evolved into selling a myriad of stuff.

Skills at the top was a favourite of mine, and I'd look forward to my mum taking me up there Saturday afternoon to the upstairs where they had that big train set up.

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Yard was full of scrap...used to sell him lead and buy pram wheels for the trolleys we built as a kid. Scientific exchange had shops both sides at one time...Not forgetting Marshall and Hancocks the ironmongers at the top...

Thanks, poohbear, and all others that have replied to my enquiry. One other thing that comes back to me is that there was a pub called the Marquis of Waterford. I remember this because there was gate giving access to an alley that presumably led to the back of the premises, and over it was a sign proclaiming the pub's name. One day when, aged about 6, I saw a man leaning against the gate and loafing there as if he owned the place, as quite possibly he did, I thought to myself "he must be the Marquis".

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In the early 60s I was living not far away, above Dewhursts Butchers up Alfreton Road opposite Jersey Kapwoods,

Down the alley by the pub (name?) It was Ropey then and last time I drove past the upstairs windows were as bad.

Still green and never been painted since the 40's probably. Dewhursts long gone!

Worst place I ever lived, When the bucher boiled up his fat in the old gas copper outside, it filled the

bathroom with smoke!

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I worked at the Nottingham Scientific Exchange in the 60s..I managed the Photo shop and worked in the hardware and tools section. It was owned by the Ingle family. I moved to Australia after leaving their employment and I guess the Ingle's are long gone.

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Heres an earlier image of Peveril Street.

peverilst.jpg

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I worked at the Nottingham Scientific Exchange in the 60s..I managed the Photo shop and worked in the hardware and tools section. It was owned by the Ingle family. I moved to Australia after leaving their employment and I guess the Ingle's are long gone.

Nottingham Scientific Exchange was one of my favourite shops in the 60's.

I used to call in most afternoons on my way home from work.

My first job after leaving Forest Fields in 1966 was as a Lab Technician at Roland Green School in Wilford.

I used to get dropped off at the top of Peveril St by the head of science a Mr Stan Reid on his way home.

He used to drive a VW Beetle and was well versed in electronics. I learnt a lot from Stan.

I bought loads of stuff at NSE. Walkie Talkies, tools and other stuff but most memorably in 1967 my dad bought me a wonderful Sanyo tape recorder from there. I had hours of fun with it.

I think Nick Daykin started out at NSE before he set up his Hi-Fi shop

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yes a great shop,the original one on the right going up the hill, so too was Eddy's, not sure if still Peveril Street (just above Skill's) but near enough if not, a real alladins cave full of ex WD stuff, radio's, transmitters, morse stuff etc, one of the fav buys for our push bike gang were tank aerials! about a shilling then, we'd mount them on our rear axle, god know why, but seemed a good idea at the time! In later motorbike years around same area Gaggs "Mad house" and Knowles Motorbike Spares, a shop that full of bikes in various states of decay you could only just get in the door took over as our interests.

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Hi Mess, i remember Mr Reid i was at Roland Green from 1967. He had a short wave radio in a suitcase, apparently belonged to a spy. He was a very strict teacher but fair, you must be able to recall some of the other teachers.

Den.

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Hi, Mess, Denshaw. It is interesting that you mention Stan Reid as a science teacher. I recall a man of this name at High Pavement around 1965. He taught mathematics, if I remember right, and had a reputation for running a tight ship. He also was a radio ham, so it sounds as if it must be the same man.

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Hi Mess, i remember Mr Reid i was at Roland Green from 1967. He had a short wave radio in a suitcase, apparently belonged to a spy. He was a very strict teacher but fair, you must be able to recall some of the other teachers.

Den.

Not sure but I think Stan Reid claimed he was in Special Operations during WWII and the SW suitcase radio was his.

He was very strict and used the cane frequently which quite shocked me.

If you toed the line and worked hard he was fine although he was very intolerant of untidy work.

He seemed to favour the girls.

There's a few tributes to him on the Roland Green page of Friends Reunited.

Other teachers mentioned there who I remember are Mr Preston (Jake)Headteacher. Ray Chaplin Deputy who died a few years back but who ex pupils remember fondly. Maurice Trigg Science. Mr Smith Maths and Football coach and Mick Coombes PE who every girl without fail fancied.

I knew Mick Coombes when he was at Forest Fields as a pupil. There's some great pictures of him as a youngster on the Forest Fields page of FR

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Hi, Mess, Denshaw. It is interesting that you mention Stan Reid as a science teacher. I recall a man of this name at High Pavement around 1965. He taught mathematics, if I remember right, and had a reputation for running a tight ship. He also was a radio ham, so it sounds as if it must be the same man.

Yes I think you could be right although I started as a Lab Techn at Roland Green in Oct 1966 and got the impression he's been there a few years before.

Can't remember him talking about High Pavement

Stan was definitely a big radio ham and very disciplined. Always very smart and well presented.

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Not sure but I think Stan Reid claimed he was in Special Operations during WWII and the SW suitcase radio was his.

He was very strict and used the cane frequently which quite shocked me.

If you toed the line and worked hard he was fine although he was very intolerant of untidy work.

He seemed to favour the girls.

There's a few tributes to him on the Roland Green page of Friends Reunited.

Other teachers mentioned there who I remember are Mr Preston (Jake)Headteacher. Ray Chaplin Deputy who died a few years back but who ex pupils remember fondly. Maurice Trigg Science. Mr Smith Maths and Football coach and Mick Coombes PE who every girl without fail fancied.

I knew Mick Coombes when he was at Forest Fields as a pupil. There's some great pictures of him as a youngster on the Forest Fields page of FR

Just remembered Sue Best (quite attractive I recall) Maths. Mr Koluka Metalwork I think, Shelia Millington School Secretary, Steve Reid Geography and Folk singer and Ted Barnes School Caretaker (lived with his wife in a bungalow ajoining the school)

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Thanks Ash for the reminder of the electronics store between Skills and Forest Road.

I remember him selling the early Clive Sinclair miniture Radio & TV.

micromatic_mk1_478095.jpg

http://www.radiomuse...omatic_mk1.html

I had one of those.

Bought it as a kit but after I'd put it all together it didn't work (probably burnt out the transistors with my cr*p soldering technique)

Anyway in the literature it said if you can't get it to work after you've assembled it just send it back and you'll get a brand new working one back.

Can't think Sir Clive made much money out of this but it was a great design.Think it was called a matchbox radio in the original ad.

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LOL - I had the same experience with a Sinclair Micromatic. They sent me a nice new working model! I kept it for years, but didn't use it much.

You are right - he didn't make much money off them. He was a brilliant inventor, but a lousy businessman. Whenever he found an improvement to one of his designs, he would halt production. As such, very few were made the same, and the advantages of bulk buying, etc. were lost.

He also produced one of the first digital watches (The Black Watch - I had one of those too), and the first small TV that was VERY innovative in that it could handle both PAL (Europe) and NTSC (North America) signals.

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