Car Number Plates


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At least you don't have to figure out what these plates mean, britgal [me] and britchick [Zumba instructor]

As a lad, I went to Whipsnade. All that I saw was a dog. That was a Shih Tzu.

When I was a nipper I lived in Papplewick and my dad had a flat roofed office at the back of the house. I used to sit up there for hours watching planes taking off and landing (Vulcans aaahhh) with an

Seen those Malcolm. I saw one in Wollaton on a gold Jag GRA 1 N . I often wondered if it was owned by a farmer.

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Or a message to a traffic warden...... P 155 OFF

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Can't see the point myself in having a personal number plate, my sister has one, but why ?

Last firm I worked for had every vehicle registered with a number plate with the company name, again why ? When you saw a wagon hurtling down the road with the company name painted all over it why bother spending a lot of money on that rubbish ?

One upmanship, snobbery ? Pass me the bucket I want to puke.

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A lot of radio hams go for number plates that have their call signs, typical cost from DVLA is about £400-1000. M1OAU is a valid UK call sign but the on-line ham directories say it's not currently issued.

See: http://www.ukvehicle.com/M1OAU/ Looks like it was Y-reg originally.

MB

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I've had a personalised number plate for a many years and it's not a case of one-up-man-ship or snobbery, it's so I recognise my car in a car park!

A friend of ours (a very wealthy man) had GW 1 on his Rolls Royce, he was offered loads for it but wouldn't sell. He passed away a few years ago but I imagine his family have hung onto the number.

We bought our son a personalised plate for his 21st birthday as a present he could have forever.

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A true story,a relative of mine living on Sanford rd. has recently finished restoring a 1930's touring car..he's had it years..when he rang Swansea(?) to put it on the road..the reg had been sold..four years ago..by an insider they reckon!!

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My first car, bought in the 1970s when I was but a callow and innocent youth, was a Ford Anglia, registration 32 HRR. After running it for a year or so, I wanted a better car so flogged it for £50.

A year later, the registration was sold by the new owner for £2000.

:(

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My first car, bought in the 1970s when I was but a callow and innocent youth, was a Ford Anglia, registration 32 HRR. After running it for a year or so, I wanted a better car so flogged it for £50.

A year later, the registration was sold by the new owner for £2000.

:(

I was a bit like that with my first car. It was a Ford Anglia 100E, registered 75 ETV. A few years after I had it it went to a number cruncher and got sold for its plates. It sold for similar money to yours

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My Dad bought a brand new Honolulu blue Austin 1100 (in '62-ish?) The registration was 204VAL, obviously a Nottingham registration and my sisters name is Val. When it came time to trade the car I told my dad not to sell the car with that registration but he did and a bloke in Wollaton bought the car so his wife could have the registration on her VW Sirocco, her name was Val as well.

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I remember car number plates originating in Notts usually had either TO, TV or AU at the end of the lettered part. E.G:- KTO, KTV, HAU etc.

Somewhere I have a book showing how to identify a car county origin from it's number plate (of the period) from these last 2 letters, it showed all the counties in the UK.

Must look it up and post on here, anyone else remember this?

It was always in the back of the AA manual back in the day. Nottingham's were: AL, AU, CH, NN, NU, RB, RR, TO, TV apologies if I've missed any.

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A neighbour of mine in Cardiff has B10NIC, he owned a club by the same name.

I have T5SUX which was bought for me my an ex. There was a pedantic, fascist traffic cop at the time who was terrorising the area. He busted me twice for next to nowt and he drove a police Volvo T5, hence the birthday present.

My last three with the reg:

XohxPCZ.jpg

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My favourite car number plate was on a NSU 1200cc rear engined, air cooled car that I had in the mid-70s. I lost count of how many folk came to me and said "Your number plate says "Sausage". It was SAU 513G.

I also had JNN62K on a reliant Supervan. More commonly referred to by others as "Junk".

My first real car was a Morris Traveller with the now collectable number 109 MAA.

As a teen my scooter was GRR 467D. An angry sounding number befitting a mod machine.

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When I was a nipper I lived in Papplewick and my dad had a flat roofed office at the back of the house. I used to sit up there for hours watching planes taking off and landing (Vulcans aaahhh) with an old WWII tank site for a telescope at Hucknall Aerodrome including the flying bedstead. The air shows were fantastic from my private viewing area. I used to watch the buckets throwing overburden on the Hucknall pit tips as well. Years later I'm at a company called 'Flight Refuelling' in Wimborne and noticed an old Rover 60 with the registration VTO 1. As it was a (cool) Nottingham registration I was intrigued. I found the bloke it belonged to and he said he'd bought the car from Alan Griffith's family, the inventor of the flying bedstead. He was the guy who built the flying bedstead that I used to watch as a kid from my dads roof. I don't remember the name of the car owner but he took me for lunch at 'The Harrier' pub down the road and we must have talked solidly for two hours about Hucknall aerodrome. He was one of the most fascinating guys I'd ever met. The fact that Alan Griffith was given the registration as a dinner award for his work on vertical take off and it was a Nottingham registration was purely coincidental.

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