Cliff Ton

Visiting the grandparents

Recommended Posts

Lucy Saunt, my great grandmother gave birth to 12 live children. 6 of them died before their second birthday, one died at 14 of a brain tumour and one was obliterated by a German shell during the Great War. This does not include any stillbirths she may have had.

 

By her early 70s, her mental state had deteriorated to such an extent that she had to be institutionalized.

 

Her son's generation had to fight in the Great War and their children were caught up in WW2 so, yes, the children of the 40s 50s and early 60s have been looked upon kindly. I wouldn't want to change places.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My Maternal Grandparents moved from Highbury Vale to the Old Bestwood Estate in the 30s with their very large family,.....and when i was growing up (born there in 45) i remember nothing but happiness and kindness from all my Aunts and Uncles who were then mainly in there late teens and early 20s,.......the house was always busy and never recall any proper arguments...........Grandma always cooking Grandad and Uncles in and getting ready for work or home on leave from the Army...........but the best was my Mam and her Sisters getting ready for their nights out...........even remember em painting their legs brown or drawing a Seam down the back of em,and they were always singing....Beverley sisters,Kay sisters,Alma Cogan or Ruby Murray songs.

                          Then remember the younger ones bringing their boy/girl friends home and introducing them to all the others,they really were a happy crowd...........and will be forever thankful for growing up with such lovely people......still see them all in my dreams on occasions............

            

  • Upvote 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Visits to my grandparents always meant fresh baked cakes and scones for tea, if we happened to go at dinner time there would be homemade pie or  full dinner with Yorkshire puddings usually the size of a tea plate.  My grandfathers family were mainly miners very down to earth being an only child sometimes felt very overwhelmed at the amount of relatives i had.  Never met my grandmothers  family as they said she married beneath her, she was expected to marry a man in "business" same as her father.   My great great grandmother was born in 1870 and died when i was 3, i have a photo of myself sitting on her knee at her front door, she was wearing a black dress white apron and smoking a clay pipe, she always wore the white apron as she acted as midwife for those who could not afford a doctor.

  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father's parents lived in Humber Road, Beeston when I was a child as Chapel Street had gone by then. There always seemed to be an atmosphere between them which I later discovered dated back to Ted Sparrow's philandering in the early years of their marriage for which Kate never forgave him. As a result, Ted did most things around the house while Kate relaxed in a comfy chair! This was his penance and he just got on with it. No one who wasn't tired of living wanted to upset Kate! She had little time for people but loved animals....hmm, sounds very familiar!

 

The Sparrow side of my family rarely showed any affection and the only way of establishing how much they liked anyone was the number of insults they bestowed upon you. My father and his mother usually traded defamatory remarks as though they were going out of fashion. It was always said that dad was her favourite child, so perhaps that was why! Judging from his reaction when Kate died in 1982, my father loved her very much but it would have been physically impossible for him to say so.

 

Strange family, the Sparrows but from a genealogical point of view, an interesting bunch!

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this should be in the limericks forum, but being about Jill's grandma I thought I would post it here.

 

Don't mess with Jill's grandma Kate.

 

You'll suffer a terrible fate.

 

If you try to thwart her,

 

She'll give you no quarter.

 

For she ne'er found a man she di'nt 'ate.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#56

 

Love it, Loppy and so would she! Very true.  ;)

 

Apparently, the worst time to get on the wrong side of Kate was when she'd been to the cinema in Beeston to see Errol Flynn in one of his swashbuckling movies. She took it all rather too seriously, would come home, pick up the carving knife and dance round the kitchen threatening to "run you through" with it!  Long before my time but I still have the knife. It's a family heirloom!

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember Mam telling us that Gramma Jackson gave Grandad a bit of a hard time Benj. I can see Gramma now sitting near the fire in here armchair, she liked a drop of sherry or was it port  (Bless her)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

She certainly gave Grandad a tough time.......she would sit in that armchair and told everyone what she thought of em.......no holds barred,........loved her drink.........but she kept the family together........in her later years she'd spend days or weeks with one of her Daughters....must admit the sisters used to argue a bit over who's turn it was.........but our lovely Aunt Gwen had her more than anyone,she lived with Harold her husband on Bulwell lane Basford,the Pear Tree being their local and sometimes 'Catchums'.......Grandma ended her days there............not catchums.........Gwen and Harold's house..........lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite poignant - and so very true..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now