rob237

High Pavement School Song...

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rob237

"...Sorry this is way off thread but I have just noticed an entry of yours way back in 2007 where you quote the start of the old school song - Una voce concinamus omnes Paviores. Any chance you have the rest of it? Would love to get hold of a copy for old times sake. I am no latin scholar so have no idea what the words mean, although I estimate I must have sung it some 2,000 times. I can hear the next line or so in my mind but there is no way i am going to make a d... fool of myself by trying to spell it out. Hope you can oblige. My years were 43 to 49..." Hackie.

Hackie,

http://website.lineone.net/~milbourn/index.html

(Click top left to hear the song...many memories etc, within)

http://website.lineone.net/~milbourn/Pavior%20Nov%2009.pdf

(Current High Pavement Society newsletter...)

http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/NOTTSGEN/1999-06/0929650830

(Ancestory.com thread, from your era!...)

The words, and score, of the school song were included in the excellent book that was published in 1988, to mark the bi-centenary. Unfortunately, no longer have my copy...

Sometimes comes up for sale on eBay...

Cheers

Robt P

52 to 59

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Thanks for that Rob.

I attended High Pavement from 1954 until 1957. My first year was at Stanley Road before the move to Bestwood.

I was 'asked' to leave and my final year's schooling was at the Ellis.

I recall at one school concert in ??? Hall in the town being reprimanded after stuffing paper in the organ tubes, oh the memories!!

Regards.

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Had to have been the Albert Hall!

Perhaps the wrong prank to play, as their organ was a speciality of the formidable deputy-Head, the terrifying Ralph Crossland...all stops out, and blow the roof off!

We clearly overlapped with Stanley Road/Gainsford Crescent etc...

Can't recall anyone leaving after 3 years...who did you kill? :rolleyes:

BTW: A further thought on the school song...

IIRC, it was written by Senior Classics Master "Isiah" Clarke - so named as he had one eye higher than the other...

Cheers

Robt P.

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I really can't remember what I did apart from being a big, surly and stroppy youth!

I do however recall burning my books and satchel in the playground when it was very foggy, that may have been after I had been given my marching orders.

I am just thankful my life was guided onto the right tracks in my early 20's, but that's another story.

Regards.

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rob237

The words, and score, of the school song were included in the excellent book that was published in 1988, to mark the bi-centenary. Unfortunately, no longer have my copy...

Sometimes comes up for sale on eBay...

Cheers

Robt P

52 to 59

I got one - not on eBay but on Amazon. This is a real laugh because my company actually printed it and I designed the front cover. Anyway, below are the complete lyrics:

Carmen Paviorem

Una voce concinamus omnes Paviores.

Nutricis virorum nostrae scholae laudatores.

Remo, pila, pede, caestu internos certantes.

Crescimus in vires mentem. Artibus firmantes.

Scholae tamen neque nostrum affectamus laudem.

Ludis omnibus et pensis aspernantes fraudem.

Ut in schola sic per annos posteros vivamus:

Republicae non nobis semper consulamus.

Does anyone have an accurate translation of the whole song? I'm sure Mr Osborne would have got us to translate it for Latin homework at some stage? I know it starts of by asking all the Paviors to sing together with one voice.

Of course you could always trust Google's on-line translator which comes up with the following...

Google translation:

Paviorem Dutch

With one voice sing together all the Paviors.

Nurses praise the men of our school. 

Remus is the ball with the foot, hide gloves, internal longer be struggling. Increases in the powers of the mind. Arts conclusions. 

And none of us, however, of the School sincerely desire praise. 

When the game was rebelling against all things, and expenses fraud. 

So that in years, by a school of future generations would live for the Republic, not to us always to be consulted.

LOL!

Andy C. High Pavement 69-74

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I also posted the song on a Latin translation forum... No luck as yet. Either it's a very hard thing to translate or the Google translation is spot on after all! LOL

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Can't recall anyone leaving after 3 years...who did you kill? :rolleyes:

Cheers

Robt P.

By an amazing coincidence, while reading this, our neighbours father, who bears an uncanny resemblance to a certain old boy of yours, Harold Shipman, drove up, or perhaps it really is him, I couldn't make out the badge on his blazer, unfortunately.

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I am another old Pavior 1953-1959.

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Just came across this thread. I did Latin O level, so even though I am very rusty I reckon I can come-up with a better translation than Google.

Lauda Fi!

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With one voice we praise all Paviours,

Encouraging the men of our esteemed school,

By oar, with the javelin, on foot and by fist we compete amongst ourselves,

Developing the academic life. With well honed learning.

Nevertheless we do not seek praise from our teachers,

We reject all thoughts of cheating in competition,

We shall live our lives as we do at school,

We serve the public good.

And next we shall be revising the jussive subjunctive. !rotfl!

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Rather considered "and expenses fraud" in #5 to be dubious, if not topical...

Cheers

Robt P.

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With one voice we praise all Paviours,

Encouraging the men of our esteemed school,

By oar, with the javelin, on foot and by fist we compete amongst ourselves,

Developing the academic life. With well honed learning.

Nevertheless we do not seek praise from our teachers,

We reject all thoughts of cheating in competition,

We shall live our lives as we do at school,

We serve the public good.

And next we shall be revising the jussive subjunctive. !rotfl!

Thanks bamber - good work! My old Latin teacher Mr Osborne would be most impressed.

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In my day (1961 - 1966) it was always sung to close each end of term assembly, and it was a tradition to sound the 's' at the end as a hiss - 'consulamusssssssss'.

I seem to remember that because the headmaster ('Albert') objected to this hissing the song ceased to be sung on those occasions.

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Does anyone by any chance remember my cousin, Anthony (Tony) Daniels? He was at High Pavement (Bestwood) but I think only in the first form 1955-56. He did his primary education and took the 11 plus at the Arboretum special school, as he suffered from cystic fibrosis and all the heart and lung problems that go with it. I remember going to a concert at High Pavement (Christmas 1955 maybe). They lived on Arnside Road at the time. His dad (my uncle) was a civil servant with the Ministry of Labour, and got promotion, so that they moved to Cleethorpes in Summer or Autumn 1956. Tony's health declined and he died in 1959, aged 15. I was absolutely devastated. Although he was 5 years older than me, and we often had the most awful arguments, he was undoubtedly my best and most trusted friend. For three years our two families had lived in adjacent prefabs - nos. 11 and 13 Aslockton Drive, and he and I were more like brothers than cousins.

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Ready for 1st day at High Pavement 1953, short trousers were required for the first form.

8644849603_42c9c16197_c.jpg

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In the 3rd form, long trousers & no cap. 1955.

8645969168_8bb81bf6b1_c.jpg

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Wretched place, a miserable existence from day one in 1967 to leaving in July 1972. Set me up for the rest of life - not!

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Yes - nobody bothered with a cap after the first form.

The other thing was, starting out all shiny and new in the first form you had a smart satchel to carry your books (and sandwiches!) in, but then you soon conformed with the majority and acquired a shapeless khaki haversack to lug around instead.

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I didn't enjoy my time at High Pavement, I wasn't the best of pupils, I didn't work very hard, but I came from a working class home where study was not done, but in retrospect I learned a lot at the school and ended up in quite a good job that I could not have expected in any other way.

The grammar schools certainly enabled some working class people to better their situation, but of course the rest at secondary moderns were not so fortunate.

There were some excellent teachers at HP in the 1950's, Mr Crossland & Mr Dunn (chemistry), Mr Thrasher & Mr Saaymans (physics), Mr Hill (Biology), Mr Middleton (English). Mr Bullock (Maths).

Mr Bullock and I didn't get on, I didn't do much work for him. I was good at maths but didn't like continuously doing things I knew I could do so didn't do anything Mr Bullock told the class that all would get their O levels except me. We the did the mock exams and I came top. I ended up with a report which said: Term Grade E, result 90+% (I forget exactly what), Exam Grade A and got my GCE.

Mr Quincey taught me to play chess at the chess club. Later in life I played in the London Commercial Chess League and played in places like the canteen at New Scotland Yard, in the Shell Centre on the South Bank, in the plush offices of Allen & Overy the solicitors and in the National History Museum.

It was a good school, and served me well even if I didn't realize it at the time.

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@ Merthyr Imp, re #15. Sorry for the tardy response, but I may have the reason for the 'traditional' hissing at the end of the school song. You may recall that there was an annual speech day at school, but there was a 'big' speech day at the Albert Hall Nottm., every five years. This was so that every student got to attend at least one. I think our 5 year bash was in 1962 when I was in 2nd year. The music teacher was Frank Williams, who later emigrated to Australia. Anyway, Frank was rehearsing the lower school ('treble' voices) for our part in a 'vocal rendition' of 'The Grand March' from Verdi's Aida, which was to be the centrepiece of the proceedings.

However, he also decided to do a couple of 'run throughs' of the school song. He picked us up on the sibilance at the end of the last word 'consulamus'. Naturally, we did it even more and he eventually smiled and gave up, no doubt hoping we were just on a wind up. But the practice spread.

If you listen to the song as recorded in (I suppose,) the 1950s, (See Rob's link above) they sing the word 'consulaaaaaaaamuuuuus'. We sang it more like 'consulaaaaaaa muussssssssss.

I'm not surprised Albert didn't like the hissing. Bit of an old misery he was. Most of us didn't like him much. Harry Davies, his predecessor, was a much better bloke all round.

I enjoyed most of my time at HP, but I think I could have made more of it had I been a bit 'sharper'.

Col

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DJ360 - you could very well be right about the origin of the 'sssss'. I don't remember that myself, but I was there! After all these years I can't listen to the Grand March from Aida without putting the words to it that we had to learn:

Glory to Isis, who from all

wardeth away disaster.

To Egypt's royal master

raise we our festive song

('No, boys, you have to forget you're from Nottingham - sing it as 'marster' and 'disarster'')

And remember the song from The Marriage of Figaro we also had to sing? To be honest I can only remember part of it:

Say goodbye now to pastime and play, lad

Say goodbye to your airs and your graces ('who's singing 'braces'?')

Here's an end to the life that was gay, lad (we thought nothing of such a phrase in those far-off days)

Here's and end to your games with the girls

Here's an end to your romps in the hay, lad (except that line had to be cut as it was thought too indelicate for the audience)

Regarding Albert, it was a reign of terror - I remember once, even Bill Gray referred to him as a tyrant.

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Ahh yes.

'Glory to Issis

God bless his Missis'.. as we said...

At my '5 year bash', a few other things stick in my mind.

First was that 3 or 4 upper school lads did a very noisy re-enactment of 'Gee Officer Krupke' from West Side Story.

The organ of the Albert Hall also had a delay between pressing the keys, and the music emerging. This caused Music Teacher Frank Williams and the pupil who played organ during Aida etc., to work out all sorts of little coded signals so that the organ and the singing arrived at the same time.

Finally. We squeaky voiced 'trebles', were all ranged in the area below the organ, facing the assembled mob. After the interval, one lad, whose face I can still see but whose name escapes me, returned late and started picking his way slowly down to his seat. He was the only person moving in the whole place. Frank simply motioned him to go back from whence he had come, causing a mix of sympathetic 'Aaahhs' from some parents and barely suppressed hysterics from most of the pupils.

There may have been rather more to the excision of the 'romps in the hay' than was obvious too. As I recall, though I'm not sure which year, word got out that a school pupil on a trip to Annecy or similar, had been discovered to have had his own 'romp in the hay', with a local lass. It might have been a young member of hotel staff or somesuch, I don't recall. Full details were, as you might expect, severely censored.

Whatever. It's only one of two occasions where we witnessed Harry Davies very close to 'losing it'. At the end of assembly and with a face like thunder, he simply announced that XXXXX XXXXX had been suspended from school, then swept out of the hall, gown billowing and him still obviously seething. Can't recall if expulsion followed. I'm sure Harry wasn't against lads developing a healthy interest in girls, but I imagine he'd be enraged at the damage to the reputation and honour of the school.

Incidentally, the second time I saw him so emotional was when he announced the death of one of the Masters. He was clearly devastated. I don't properly recall who it was.

Col

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@ BulwellBrian,

I remember most of the teachers you mention and was taught by them all at some point except for Mr Crossland and Mr Saaymans.

'Dinky' Dunn was a very good Chem teacher but occasionally had a short fuse.

On one occasion, we had been doing the famous 'heat up the Potassium Nitrate in a hard glass 'ignition tube' to drive off oxygen and do the re-lighting of a glowing splint,' trick. Dinky told us to stop what we were doing and sit down. Myself and Geoff Eite were on the back row.

Geoff put his ignition tube onto his open jotter and neither of us noticed that the hot Nitrate was still flowing in the tube.

A few seconds later, the Nitrate, mad hot and still oxygen rich, hit the jotter, which went up like a flare, accompanied by great clouds of smoke. Geoff, in a blind panic, closed the jotter over it, which if anything made things worse. He then began trying to beat out the flames.

It's the conversation which followed that I'll never forget:

Dinky " You boy! What are you playing at? Turn that tap off!!" (He seemed to think that Geoff was somehow creating steam)

Geoff (Who was always exceptionally 'correct' in his dealings with staff) "Please Sir, I can't Sir!!"

Dinky " What do you mean, you can't?"

Geoff ( In a near hysterical voice and still frantically beating his jotter) "Because, Sir, my jotter appears to have spontaneously ignited!!"

We fell about laughing, and I think even Dinky had a glint of humour in his eye.

Anyone else of course would have been "Oh F**K!!!", but not Geoff.

Geoff appeared on facebook a while back, but his last post was rather cryptic and dark. He's not on there now. I do hope he's not left us.

Col

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