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Long eared bat on the wall in an old store room,there was no hatch cover in the loft,so he used to come down each night for a wonder round,sometimes he was still there in the morning when i arrived at work,he/she is about the same size as a matchbox,

 

DSCF3843_zps89zabnup.jpg

 

Probably get shot for taking his/her picture,no bats were harmed during the taking of these pictures

 

DSCF3842_zpsh2cjkbxq.jpg

 

Rog

 

 

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Reading this:-

file:///C:/Users/Jim/Downloads/Bat_Box_Information_Pack.pdf

It seems that if the entrance is vertical, from below, they are self cleaning. If the entrance is horizontal, midway up the box then they do need cleaning.

Re the jobs worth crew I have some experience with a grade 2 listed house in Bulcote.

Cannot install central heating because it will dry the building fabric out too quickly.

Cannot patch plaster unless using materials that match the original 17th century recipe

Cannot replace window frames unless they are the same design and construction.

Cannot fit modern interior doors...

The list just goes on and on...

This was back in the '60s so I don't if the rules have been relaxed by now but at the it was a nightmare and resulted in selling it, just too much aggravation.

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There seems to be a lot of people telling a lot of other people what they can and cannot do and nothing ever gets done,  crazy

 

Rog

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#27 We have just finished a job on a grade two listed out in the sticks, the only concession we got was that the column radiators could be cast alloy not cast iron.

 

The rules have been increased not relaxed, even the rainwater guttering had to be approved. Cast Notts Ogee cost a fortune.

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After watching Homes Under The Hammer, and a multitude of other renovation programmes, I'm amazed that ANYTHING ever gets done. I agree with certain things, such as the non approval of cheap flimsy guttering, and certain UPVC windows, but some regs applying to the interiors, and the types of plaster and  mortar that are useable  are downright laughable . 

I'm certain it's mainly to keep folk employed within local councils. 

Funnily enough, folk seem to get away with having driveways and front gardens completely covered in 10mm gravel, or slate, or even concrete  / Tarmac. 

Even though I've only a small frontage, I recently spent nearly 8k on coloured block paving, and  I insisted on retaining my three small borders just to add a bit of colour, variety and brightness. 

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There lies the problem of localised flooding when we have a storm,because gardens/driveways have been paved over the rain water has no where to go except in the drains which can't cope with the volume of water,I too have 20mm flint gravel on my front garden but underneath is a permeable membrane that allows the water to soak away naturally,

 

Rog

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Whilst I agree with you in a lot of case's, there does need to be some common sense, something sadly lacking these days.

 

Good quality plastic guttering in the correct shape should be allowed in some case's, the price difference both for materials and labour is enormous. As a for instance a running outlet in top of the range plastic, Notts ogee pattern £3-13p + VAT, the cast stuff that had to be used, running outlet Notts ogee £41-55p + VAT and you can do that with the labour as well.

 

As to drives there to we find rules in place to try to prevent flooding which is sensible. Basically these state that if you use a permeable material you will not need planning permission. However if you want to pave a area greater than 5sqmtrs with traditional impermeable materials you will need planning permission or they will make you take it up......

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As I live on a slight slope, my driveway run off goes into the gutter. Lo and behold, what's at the bottom of the hill.... Blocked drains that haven't been cleaned out in years. In 15 odd years of living here, the council truck has been out ONCE. 

I often walk along Hucknall Rd, Mansfield Rd, Valley Rd and around town. Virtually every one is solid with leaves, soil, nub ends at other general detritus.

The recent floods in Woodborough, Southwell, and other surrounding areas was solely due to blocked drains, gullys, culverts, dykes etc. Do the councils listen.... No chance!

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Do the councils listen to the people about anything?I think not

 

Rog

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FLY2 #33

 

Just the same where I live,every time it rains heavy you need wellies to wade through the puddles caused by blocked drains.

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We are lucky we get an annual visit from the gully sucker which is a good job. We live 3/4s the way up a steep hill which means we will always be safe but the road makes a sharp left at the bottom with house's below street level on the opposite side, they would be flooded with out the top water gully's.

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This lunch time I sliced a loaf on a bread board that I made 65 years ago. I was 13 years old at the time and at Berridge. I turned that bread board on a lathe and the piece of 'deal' was scrap from the centre of toilet seats. Can you imagine a 13 year old being let anywhere near a wood working machine with a large face plate these days?

I started learning woodwork at 10 when at the Windley jr school. The woodwork shop was on Tennyson St annex. Again - can you imagine a ten y/o wielding sharp chisels and saws these days? 

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Glad you said scrap pp !

Woodworking tools !  Kids today wouldn't know what to do with them except maybe stab each other !

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Time to check out/clean/repair or make a bird box. It seems to me that the less fancy a bird box is, the more the birds like them.

 

Just thinking about the woodwork shop at the Windley School annex and remembered the large glass case showing samples of timber.

I would love to own one of those sample cases by Fitchett & Wallacott. The different types of wood and the geographic origins fascinated me.

 

 

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