tingly

Traffic Street Sweet Factory and Wood Factory

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[]Hello there

I was chatting to my Mum today who is in frail health at age 85, and she is desperately trying to remember the name of two places she and her late father worked in in the late 40's

They apparently were both on traffic street nottingham.

My mum worked in the sweet factory at age 14 and remembers being disappointed because they only made one sort which was a toffee!! Her dad used to work as a wood machinist/lather (she cant remember) in the factory right next door to the sweet factory. They used to meet every lunchtime.

I am assuming that the factory her dad worked in was an actual wood place but it might just be somewhere that involved wood turning.

Just wondered if anyone could help please? Google has not been successful with this one!!

Many Thanks

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Hello tingly. Here's something which might help you a bit.

This map is from 1899 (which I guess is the time of your mum's father), and if you look at Traffic Street at the Wilford Road end you'll see there is a "Timber Yard"..... and near the Arkwright Street end there is a "Saw Mill".

And you can also see a Timber Yard off Waterway Street West

Seems like the area was full of wood-working places

trafficstreet.jpg

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Full name: John S. Derbyshire & Son Ltd., wholesale grocers, teamen & confectioners, Peak Tea Warehouse & Steam Confectionery Works, Traffic Street, Nottingham.

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Seems they made the likes of this:

PreWarIsleOfWightBiscuitToffeeTin.jpg

Pre-war Isle of Wight biscuit/toffee tin.

Made by John S. Derbyshire & Son Limited, Traffic Street, Nottingham, England, who were trading at this address pre-war as wholesale grocers, teamen and confectioners.

The tin has a picture of the 'Old Village, Shanklin, I.W.' on the lid, showing thatched cottages.

The side of the tin has the wording 'The Contents 1 LB. Net'.

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Thanks all. You are truly brill. tWas indeed derby shires and the wood place was called mills company Nottingham I believe.

Brill website

Xxx

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Hopefully the OP will still be watching this thread. And anybody else who hasn't seen what the Medders looks like these days

Had a wander up around Traffic Street today to see what's left of it. Not much really.

At the top end facing towards Wilford Road it's a bit of a tip

traffic1.jpg

Bottom end onto Queens Drive still looks a bit like it used to

traffic2.jpg

And moving a bit across the road there's the old Crown pub on the junction of Crocus Street/Arkwright Street. The new apartments at the back are on Queens Road alongside the station

crown.jpg

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Hello tingly. Here's something which might help you a bit.

This map is from 1899 (which I guess is the time of your mum's father), and if you look at Traffic Street at the Wilford Road end you'll see there is a "Timber Yard"..... and near the Arkwright Street end there is a "Saw Mill".

And you can also see a Timber Yard off Waterway Street West

Seems like the area was full of wood-working places

trafficstreet.jpg

THANKS CLIFFTON .FOR THIS MAP MY GRANDFARTHER LIVED AT NO 26 WATERWAY ST AROUND THE TIME OF THIS MAP ITS BEEN A GREAT HELP TO ME.THANKS AGAIN

BABS

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Babs

Here's another version of the map. I've re-aligned it so you can see all of Waterway Street, because on the first version I'd only included half of it

waterway.jpg

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hi my mum also worked in this factory she often told me about wearing wooden clogs and sliding from one end of the factory yard to the other in the snow .if anyone remembers her CICELY WETTON WHEN MARRIED BECAME HALLSWORTH

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My first ever job on leaving school was at "Redgates" soft drink factory on Traffic street, no long gone.

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Furse were on there too at that time....was it the lift (elevator) dept.?

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I worked at the builders merchants on Traffic Street, Horsley Smiths, it was at the Wilford Road end opposite Redgates. It was taken over by Jewsons in 1976.

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hello not forgetting wilsons printers who moved there from park row. i worked at both sites for about 12 months from 1964.

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Hiya beef, you any relation to the famous Beefsteak?

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I ain't a gotten any re lay tives in Burton Joyce or Fred and Gladys either

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i was originally from sneinton, taylor close near the top of boulo (sneinton blvd) and went to greenwood bilateral.

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Hello tingly. Here's something which might help you a bit.This map is from 1899 (which I guess is the time of your mum's father), and if you look at Traffic Street at the Wilford Road end you'll see there is a "Timber Yard"..... and near the Arkwright Street end there is a "Saw Mill".And you can also see a Timber Yard off Waterway Street WestSeems like the area was full of wood-working placestrafficstreet.jpg

Just seen the old map of The Medders you put on here Cliff Ton ...... Thanks! My mum grew up on Queens Grove and my Granny lived there til her death in 1963. It holds lovely memories for me as we visited several times a week and she fed us stew and chips regularly! But oh my, what a dump it was down there! My Mum and her siblings would meet Granny in The Grove pub (now The Vat and Fiddle) every Friday night, they all liked their pop!

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It was rough, but it was a community.

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Yes absolutely Mick. Two of my aunts moved out of the family home but still stayed on Queens Grove when they got married. I remember Mum telling me how the piano was floating on the ceiling when the Trent flooded in 1947. I remember the row of toilets up the yard, with newspaper cut up for loo paper and as the years went by the whole street began to smell of curry as the Asian immigrants began to move in!! Yes, there was a great community spirit in those old areas of Nottingham, not like today ...... Or maybe it's just where I live that folks don't talk to their neighbours?

Incidentally, the family lived there because it was 2 mins from the railway station which suited my Grandad as he was a shop fitting electrician for Boots all his working life, travelling all over the country as Boots set up their empire of high street shops. I have a shoebox full of postcards he sent home from every corner of the British Isles where he was working. They don't make fascinating reading as he was a man of few words!

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